Everything gone to hell, again!

#41
Macri waited too long to reach out to the IMF to negotiate this "stand-by" agreement given the ticking bomb the KK's left behind. It should have been done in May, 2017 when the boat had minor leaks.

I supported Macri for president because to vote for the alternative would have been unthinkable. But I had no high expectations that the economy would "grow and thrive" during his first term. At best it would chug along for the next 4 years. So it does not come as a surprise that today the economy is floundering but the crisis is not here yet.
 
#42
The funny thing is the folks who believe Macri created this - not understanding the damage that has been done the past 10 years under the K regime before stepping into office. They left a ticking time bomb and got out at a good time. I'm not holding my breath for the day Argentina doesn't have to deal with an inflation crisis. The news/media doesn't help by making massive headlines and constantly dramatising the USD.
 
#43
“Once it was our turn at the exchange window, the Casa de Cambio refused to exchange our Dollars because my wife's Uruguayan passport and Cedula were apparently not sufficient proof of her legal status in Argentina, only the flimsy, white entry document/ receipt issue at the border, which we did not have with us, would suffice to prove our worthiness to exchange our foreign Dollars for their beloved Pesos .”

Did you go to a bank? I’ve never gone to a casa de cambio and been asked for documentation. I just give them my money they give me Pesos in return and that’s that.
 
#45
The current situation is a direct result of Macri trying to continue the policies of Cristina while trying to steer the economy in the right direction. You can’t do both. It’s like he claimed “mission accomplished” before actually realizing the opposition wasn’t going to just roll over and play dead.

The other problem is these guys don’t know how to communicate anything to the populace. Should have said day 1, “argentina is broke, we have to start over and everyone has to tighten their belt”. Instead they went the other way and told the people that all was rosy right away. Nothing changed in the attitudes of the people and the market is now forcing a correction.

Israel’s example in how they went from hyperinflation to a normal and successful economy should have been followed but sadly the concept of self sacrifice and putting country before your own selfish desires does not exist here. Not with the populace but even less so with public servants and the unions.
Some of this analysis seems reasonable. But Israel? As an economic model.... I mean.... if macri can secure billions in military and other funding from the USA and become a client state like isreal is then yep, could work I guess .... (/sarcasm) ... :x
 
#46
Some of this analysis seems reasonable. But Israel? As an economic model.... I mean.... if macri can secure billions in military and other funding from the USA and become a client state like isreal is then yep, could work I guess .... (/sarcasm) ... :x
Ha hilarious. Except for people who actually know what Israel went through as an economy in the 80s know a very different story to the locker room economics box you seem to understand when it comes to Israel.
 
#49
Heh, at least thanks for being transparent about how much you know about the issue. Helps not waste time.
Sorry, not biting, I have nothing to prove to you. If you want to show me actual stats or studies which backup your assertions that Israel is a good economic model to follow and that the billions in subsidies funneled into the isreal economy are not propping it up, then I am happy to listen and re evaluate my views. Otherwise, have a nice life :)
 
#50
Everybody is saying that Cristina left a bomb, but the bomb has been here since Peron and then the military government. This is decades of mismanagement and lots of bad laws. Nestor inherited Menem's mess, who inherited the mess from the 80's (seriously crazy hyper-inflation much much worse than now), who inherited a mess from the military governments. And Peron spent all his money on a lot of stupid crap when Argentina should have been positioned quite well after World War 2. So these problems are not just Macri's or just Cristina's, they have been here for years and everyone just keeps trying to stick a bandaid on it and hope for the best instead of fixing the labor laws, labor unions, lowering taxes and expenditures, and letting people be free economically. It's easier to blame Macri and Cristina rather than realizing that maybe the public (and yourself) needs to quit relying on the government to manage virtually everything.

This country has freedom of religion and speech, but it certainly does not have freedom of economy. Just try starting a business and see how far you'll get. Sadly, people here think that is the norm. And then they wonder why there is thirty percent inflation and a stagnant economy in a country flush with natural resources.

That's my take! It's the same old cycle since I've been here and before.