Giving Birth In Argentina

#11
I don't know if he can get a tourist visa. I have heard it is very difficult to get unless he can show strong ties to Argentina and he can't. He has already left his job to go to Bs As to complete the requirements for the visa, and the fact that he has a pregnant girlfriend in the US gives them strong reason to believe that he will stay illegally. We will definitely look into it thought in case they can do special circumstances.
Tourist visas for Argentines aren't hard to get.
 
#12
Argentinians do have a very high acceptance rate, it's one of the reasons they've been considered off and on in the US congress to be included in the visa waiver program again. Of course, Cristina and the economy had a lot to do with why that never actually got off the ground but I bet it won't be too long (not in the next few months, I'd think, though) before Argentinians are included again in the visa waiver in the US.

But.

It does really depend on who is applying. Families applying together to go on a trip are pretty much a shoe-in (though the parents' adult children have a harder time, it's not mostly automatic like with a minor and our oldest has been seeing more of her friends being denied a renewal on their visas, when the rest of their family is approved, once they've graduated colegio). Students accepted to a US college are almost, if not as, likely to be accepted - but may be hit or miss returning on a tourist visa; I know people who have gone to study, graduated and couldn't get a tourist visa for a few years.

But you start talking about single guys or girls in their early to late twenties, it becomes more hit and miss. It starts depending on whether they own property, a car, have a good job with a history of paying taxes, etc. As Kathryn157 mentioned, you have to prove strong ties to demonstrate you have reason to return and not stay illegally.

Just because you're Argentine doesn't mean you'll get a visa.
 
#13
Just because you're Argentine doesn't mean you'll get a visa.
It's not automatic of course but the embassy here grants well over 90% of tourist visa applications and is the source of either second or third highest number of visas issued.

It's not really a barrier for real tourism to the US.
 

mmoon

Active Member
#14
I would also say that if you aren't so sure you are going to end up with this guy in the long run, be sure to have your baby in the US. If you give birth in Argentina, you won't be able to just leave and go home if things don't work out...custody laws and customs are very different here than in the US.
Not be negative when you are about to start out on this new and exciting part of your life, but since it sounds like the pregnancy came before the commitment to live together or get engaged, I'm assuming that it is speeding up the pace of your relationship and you may not have decided previously where or whether you wanted to be together in the distant future.
I also agree that your boyfriend should not mention you in his tourist visa application. Even if he's not planning to overstay, it just sounds bad.
It's a complicated situation! I wish you the best.
 
#15
I would also say that if you aren't so sure you are going to end up with this guy in the long run, be sure to have your baby in the US. If you give birth in Argentina, you won't be able to just leave and go home if things don't work out...custody laws and customs are very different here than in the US.
Not be negative when you are about to start out on this new and exciting part of your life, but since it sounds like the pregnancy came before the commitment to live together or get engaged, I'm assuming that it is speeding up the pace of your relationship and you may not have decided previously where or whether you wanted to be together in the distant future.
I also agree that your boyfriend should not mention you in his tourist visa application. Even if he's not planning to overstay, it just sounds bad.
It's a complicated situation! I wish you the best.
Yeah, we did live together, but the pregnancy came fast.It is not ideal, but we are in our 30s, college-educated, emotionally ready. The relationship could have used more time, but we are definitely committed to each other and the baby. It's just the "worst-case-scenario" that has me scared and it sounds, from the comments, like I have reason to be worried. We have been together a little over a year, living together most of that time. But obviously that is not a whole lot of time. Again, not the most ideal starting points, but we're really excited about the baby. His application is ready for the K-1 visa so now we are just waiting for his interview. Hopefully he will be here in time after all! If not, I'll definitely try the tourist visa, we'll see if he qualifies...
 
#17
As someone who has been through the "worst case scenario" I will strongly advise you to have the baby in the US. If he can't make it for the birth it won't be the end of the world. It will be, "Ah, gee. That's too bad." If you have the baby here and things go south in a bad way between the two of you it will be an absolute nightmare for 18 years.
 
#19
Some quick thoughts:

1) Your bf can most probably enter the US as a tourist and be there for the birth, even with the other stuff pending. Does he already have a visa for the US?

2) I doubt any airline (or OB) is going to allow you to fly at 35 weeks. There's not an official cut off but generally after 30 weeks, your docs and the airlines aren't going to want you flying most probably.

3) No idea on private hospitals in Ushuaia. I had mine at Mater Dei in Cap Fed and the care was fantastic.

4) Yes, if your child is born in Argentina, you would need the father's permission to leave Argentina with the baby. Something to consider.

In your case, esp given you have full insurance in CA, I wouldn't recommend coming to Argentina just to give birth.
I just searched "giving birth" and this post came up - several people have recommended Mater Dei to me recently but without anything specific, would you mind elaborating on the fantastic care and sharing a bit of your experience with me? I would SO appreciate it. I am fluent in Spanish with OSDE 310 and a porteño husband, pero de todos modos still new here and this is my first pregnancy. All details and recs and firsthand experience highly appreciated!!!
 
#20
As someone who has been through the "worst case scenario" I will strongly advise you to have the baby in the US. If he can't make it for the birth it won't be the end of the world. It will be, "Ah, gee. That's too bad." If you have the baby here and things go south in a bad way between the two of you it will be an absolute nightmare for 18 years.
I agree.

Why the emphasis on his being there?
Are you thinking that his presence at the birth will bond him with you and the child?

The only priority is a safe delivery AND pre/post-natal care. Flying a long distance late in pregnancy, changing doctors, hospitals, cities, foods, your living accomodations, your local support system, new custody laws, possibly different meds.... all unnecessary stress and risk factors for a first childbirth.

If you have the baby in Argentina are you planning to return soon to the US? Flying with a newborn?

I had a very bad experience splitting medical care between two sets of doctors in two countries. I dont recommend it.