Got into a scuffle with three chorros at Starbucks- will they seek revenge?

jeff1234

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Good lessons. Don't carry anything of value. Resist the urge to not comply.
 

Rich One

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Three teenagers came into Starbucks to “sell” stuff. One had a bunch of garbage bags in plastic wrap and came over to my table and put the bags over my phone. He kept trying to distract me from my phone and then finally left walking off with my phone. It wasn’t very subtle. I got up immediately and he tried to run so I grabbed his arm and threw him into table and then the floor, and took my phone. Then I screamed at his two friends in (in English because I was so mad) to get the f out.

In retrospect I realize I should have just let him take my phone and definitely not grabbed and physically shoved him hard because of all the stories of chorros shooting or knifing tourists, so I’m pretty lucky. But this was the Starbucks next to my apartment.

is there some chorro code now like in the US with gang bros so they will come back and look for me and try to f me up or shoot me?

You were lucky the teenager minor? chorro was not injured when you shoved him to the floor..! If the police had been called you may have faced charges for excessive force? and cited to Court.
Starbucks and other waiters are trained never to touch or irritate stuff sellers..!
 

Quilombo

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The judge in the case made mention in a conversation that a person was robbed at night in Palermo, and got a fatal gunshot wound to the head.

My observations:

Foreigners are considered prime targets. They are presumed to be unable or unwilling to testify in criminal cases.
If bad people are running away from you, don't chase after them.
Your health is more valuable than the stuff on your person.
In the scant seconds of an encounter, you may not be able to manage your own reactions, let alone anticipate the actions of the thieves. Police receive training, are armed, and wear body armor, but still lose their lives in encounters.
Suerte.

This is important to keep in mind, and I lecture my husband about giving up anything chorros want because it's not worth me and his mom burying him over, we can always buy a new phone, we can't buy a new husband and son.

Part of the reason I'm so adamant about this is because he travels to GBA Sur by public transit daily, as he works there/his family lives there, in an insecure neighborhood. My nephew is a kid, around 11, and listening to a child tell you how "He had a gun and pointed it at mom and told us give him our cellphone and mom lied and said she didn't have one and when he didn't believe her she yelled "la concha de tu madre" and we wen't inside and he drove away on his motorcycle." is a really anxiety inducing thing; I excused him directly quoting the chorro, but told him you shouldn't fight them, it's not worth getting shot, something you never want to have to tell a child...
 

steveinbsas

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I hope anyone
Robberies are unpredictable, chaotic events.

Foreigners are considered prime targets. They are presumed to be unable or unwilling to testify in criminal cases.

I hope any foreigner who is considering opening a retail business (especialy a bar) in CABA reads this.

It's difficult for me to imagine a more dangerous thing to do (on a day to day basis), especially these days.
 

Dougie

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December historically has the most crime every year in CABA and Provincia, so keep your wits about you.
 

Hippi10

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There are honest people and prior to this have always been respectful and bought stuff when I had cash on me. But now I realize that they can just be trying to distract you to rob you.

I get there is lots of poverty but it seems like these people are always Argentinos. What is preventing them from working jobs like all the Venezuelans here? Dog walking, Rappi, waiting tables, mover, whatever.

Lots of people that work at Rappi or PedidosYa deliver all sort of drugs around Buenos Aires and they don´t even get caught,
 

FrankPintor

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I get there is lots of poverty but it seems like these people are always Argentinos. What is preventing them from working jobs like all the Venezuelans here? Dog walking, Rappi, waiting tables, mover, whatever.
And to answer Fiscal's question, Venezuelans ask the same questions.
How do you know all Venezuelans ask the same question? Have you talked to every single Venezuelan out there to claim they all ask the same question?
If I had wanted to say "all Venezuelans", don't you think I would have written that? I didn't, as you can see above.

I know there are some posters here who add imagined words to people's posts, set up straw man arguments with people's imagined leanings, political and otherwise, but that has never been considered good form. I'd stop with that, if I were you.

But we can develop the theme if you like (at the risk of a thread hijack, sorry Fiscal): I have no idea how many Venezuelans you know here, I know quite a few, in various walks of life such as students (taking advantage of the free education here), fish merchants, doctors, nurses, dentists, periodontists, personal trainers, physiotherapists, teachers, delivery workers, restaurant workers, almost all of whom have had to start from zero in Argentina, with at most whatever savings they managed to bring with them (not much at all, in general). Pretty much all of them express surprise at the number of people begging or working on the street here, with some variation of Fiscal's question '"What is preventing them from working jobs" like us, cónchale vale!'
 

Dougie

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If I had wanted to say "all Venezuelans", don't you think I would have written that? I didn't, as you can see above.

I know there are some posters here who add imagined words to people's posts, set up straw man arguments with people's imagined leanings, political and otherwise, but that has never been considered good form. I'd stop with that, if I were you.

But we can develop the theme if you like (at the risk of a thread hijack, sorry Fiscal): I have no idea how many Venezuelans you know here, I know quite a few, in various walks of life such as students (taking advantage of the free education here), fish merchants, doctors, nurses, dentists, periodontists, personal trainers, physiotherapists, teachers, delivery workers, restaurant workers, almost all of whom have had to start from zero in Argentina, with at most whatever savings they managed to bring with them (not much at all, in general). Pretty much all of them express surprise at the number of people begging or working on the street here, with some variation of Fiscal's question '"What is preventing them from working jobs" like us, cónchale vale!'

Hippi's reading comprehension is atrocious.

Argentines enjoy Fernet. How do you know?? Have you spoken to every single Argentine and they claim to have liked Fernet?

Take it easy man.
 
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