Green Card Process

#1
Hello All! I´m an American citizen who has been living here for a few years. My husband and I are ready to go to the States... which is stressful. I´m wondering if anyone has any experience with this. I´m thinking that the easiest thing for us to do is for me to go back and find a job there (we need benefits as he is type 1 diabetic). The only thing that bothers me is being separated for that long with no assurance that they will give him a visa. What do you guys recommend? Does anyone have any experience?
 
#2
Hello All! I´m an American citizen who has been living here for a few years. My husband and I are ready to go to the States... which is stressful. I´m wondering if anyone has any experience with this. I´m thinking that the easiest thing for us to do is for me to go back and find a job there (we need benefits as he is type 1 diabetic). The only thing that bothers me is being separated for that long with no assurance that they will give him a visa. What do you guys recommend? Does anyone have any experience?
I have experience. First of all I would start filling, as the process takes about 1 year...
If you want PM and I'll give you details...
 
#3
See a lawyer in the US who specializes in this. I've heard that the process takes between one and two years and that under Trump they've made it harder even for the most qualified people.
 
#4
They WILL issue a visa, the law says so, only it may take a long time. See whether you could get a tourist visa, do not mention your civil
status at all. Once there, you will apply for a green card, and wait while you are already there. You can also remarry there, to make it easier
for you.
 
#5
They WILL issue a visa, the law says so, only it may take a long time. See whether you could get a tourist visa, do not mention your civil
status at all. Once there, you will apply for a green card, and wait while you are already there. You can also remarry there, to make it easier
for you.
I do not think this is good advice. Not revealing civil status could compromise the visa process. I strongly advise the petitioner to consult an immigration lawyer in the US and not to make uninformed decisions. I don't believe that the US government HAS to grant a visa.
 

ben

Active Member
#6
See a lawyer in the US who specializes in this. I've heard that the process takes between one and two years and that under Trump they've made it harder even for the most qualified people.
I have a close relative who is an immigration attorney in the US. Having worked around the office, I can tell you a lot of stories of people messing things up and it ending badly. This includes people who had previously gotten flawed advice from other attorneys and acted on it.

I do not think this is good advice. Not revealing civil status could compromise the visa process. I strongly advise the petitioner to consult an immigration lawyer in the US and not to make uninformed decisions. I don't believe that the US government HAS to grant a visa.
This is a thing people do, otherwise as @optcsa and @HenryNisental state you may be looking at a long while unable to enter the US.
Again, there are a couple of landmines here that a qualified attorney could counsel on how to sidestep.
 
#7
I think the advice to see a lawyer in the US who is expert in immigration is wise. People may do what you say but people can do the wrong thing because they haven't been well informed.
 
#8
Totally agree with the comments here. You cannot convert a tourist visa into a green card. If you try to do this, you may make his chances of ever getting a green card doubtful. Unfortunately, even though a spouse of a US citizen has highest priority, the process is much slower than it used to be. My wife was here in the US on a valid work visa (which can be used to change status to green card) when we applied last year. The process in the US takes about 14 months now. For your husband, he will need to apply from Argentina. That process will take about 24 months before he can come to the US. You should get a good immigration attorney, and answer all questions truthfully as the green card may be revoked if anything in the application was incorrect. Unfortunately, the time frames have become ridiculously long.
 
#9
I do not think this is good advice. Not revealing civil status could compromise the visa process. I strongly advise the petitioner to consult an immigration lawyer in the US and not to make uninformed decisions. I don't believe that the US government HAS to grant a visa.
Agreed. One caveat is that even US immigration lawyers vary in competence. Generally you get what you pay for.
 
#10
I would file the paperwork here and wait. When it comes time to prove your ability to “sponsor” him, perhaps you could get a family or friend to help. By benefits I assume healthcare from your job? New green card holders often have waiting periods before they can receive state benefits like Medicaid.

I wouldn't lie to immigration. People have been stuck in legal limbo for years by falsely entering on a tourist visa. It can make things really complicated.