Hard To Find/expensive Products From The States

#12
I wrote a post about this on my blog a few years ago. Perhaps you'll find it useful.

With regard to dried mustard, I'm surprised you've had trouble finding it. I've seen the good stuff (Colman's English mustard) for sale in Barrio Chino, but if you're not picky about the brand, you can buy it at most dietéticas.
 
#13
"Dame mane" is great locally produced peanut butter and even comes in smooth or chunky.
By the way, altho far from a conspiracy theorist, I have long thought that there were carcinogens in the food chain in the US. Too many cases of cancers as compared to what I've seen elsewhere. Not a scientific study altho some statistics would support my observations.
On the other hand, I've been drinking artificially sweetened beverages for 50 years and am here to write about this. But I'm not proud of it.....:)
 
#14
"Dame mane" is great locally produced peanut butter and even comes in smooth or chunky.
By the way, altho far from a conspiracy theorist, I have long thought that there were carcinogens in the food chain in the US. Too many cases of cancers as compared to what I've seen elsewhere. Not a scientific study altho some statistics would support my observations.
On the other hand, I've been drinking artificially sweetened beverages for 50 years and am here to write about this. But I'm not proud of it..... :)
http://www.wcrf.org/int/cancer-facts-figures/data-cancer-frequency-country

You're a fraction of a percent more likely to get cancer in the US than in Argentina
 
#18
If you are a coffee drinker, and you are specific about the brand or type, bring a few pounds of your preference. I am a Dunkin Donuts French Vanilla fan, and I bring a few bags of it down from the U.S. with me every time. Same for teas, if you have a specific herbal blend you like. Also - Hershey's cocoa powder for baking or hot cocoa. And I second the dark chocolate suggestion!!

I echo the ziplock thoughts - if you don't have a car, getting to the Walmart can be a pain.

My favorite brand of peanut butter was essential for me, and I bring a few jars every time I make a trip. I know Dame Mame exists, but I hated the fact that I had to run to three supermarkets to find it, with no guarantee it was in stock in a particular day.

Frankly, if possible, bring a suitcase of the food products you can't live without for the first month. While many products can be found (peanut butter, some spices, etc.), it's often a pain to be running around BA to find a basic product that is typically found in every local grocery store where you are from, especially when you are just getting your bearings in your new home. Once you are settled in, you can star running around from your neighborhood to Barrio Chino to find the <fill in the blank> product you are looking for. I found it best to start with a stocked pantry, and run around looking for replacements when you have the time.
 
#20
The food does not dry out in the Argentine frig. They are called "wet" fridges as compared to "dry" fridges in the US. I was told this by people who had lived in both countries and I find it to be true. Still. I cover my food in the fridge with a dish, so that it does not absorb odors from other foods. I do use plastic wrap occasionally for food that is left on the counter. I had a difficult time adjusting to this system, but have had good results.
I don't know if this works for all refrigerators here. You need to give it a try and see the results as they may vary, according to the type of refrigerator.