health insurance rate up

twin

Newcomer
cabj wrote:
Move back to the USA, then you get paid in dollars
Group members that have been on this forum for awile remember the the much loathed 'granadaiscool' wart/character. A very distinctive online DNA to be sure.
Anyone seen granadaiscool and cabj in the same room? Heads up, administrator.
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richardrocks

Newcomer
First of all, I'm currently paying like 240 pesos a month (not 750 like you) for the best coverage that Medicus offers -- PPO medical and dental! You can find such an offer here:

http://www.expat-connection.com/medicalinsurance

Now, will they raise my 'introductory premium' 20% a year to the point that it'll reach what you're currently paying? Probably. And this is precisely what's happened to me in the U.S. You said you looked up HMO (ick!) plans around $400 in the U.S. and maybe you think that's reasonable given average earnings. Consider that an introductory offer and add 20% a year, times a couple years, and see how much you're paying for a policy that probably has outrageous deductibles and co-pays. I get a notice from Aetna every year stating a 15% premium increase, and then, when you factor in "age bracket" increases, it has worked out to 20% a year. Many of my friends with other U.S. providers such have stated 15% plus increases as well.

You said that earnings are generally higher in the U.S. so... no biggie re: health insurance costs. but when you consider that the kind of people who have to buy their own insurance (not get it thru an employer) like myself are generally students, wage earners, or self-employed, you realize that we're not necessarily talking about people who can afford any policy at all, regardless of cost. Students and wage earners generally make peanuts, and the self-employed don't always benefit from group plan discounts, and may or may not have high incomes.

At least here there is a public health system of sorts. If you walk into an E.R. uninsured in the U.S., kiss good-bye your children's college fund (if u can afford to even have one), or get ready to mortgage your house (if you haven't done so 2 or 3 times the past several years).

As I said, it's tough times at home and/or abroad for many of us.
 

soulskier

Veteran
I am very please with my zero deductible and dental plan with Osde. I think it is a steal compared to a policy in the States.
 

sergio

Registered
Richard, again you miss the point. I am not interested in US rates. I am here in Argentina. I just mentioned what I found out about US rates since you brought it up. HEalth insurance in Argentina depends on age and plan. SOme people pay a lot more than $750 a month. There is a public health system here but it is very poor. I am sure you know that. Anyone who has a full time job has, by law, private health insurance. If your life is at stake, you want to go to a decent private clinic here, even if it means spending your life savings. Your life should be worth more. Anyway, what is happening in the US, Australia, Europe or anywhere else is not the issue. What matters is what is happening here.
 

richardrocks

Newcomer
and I showed you where I got my Medicus policy that will give you the rate of 248 pesos a month, regardless of your age. It's one of the highest plans they offer, and includes dental. you're getting ripped off elsewhere. why not dump your current plan and switch over?
 

ghost

Registered
"sergio" said:
Richard, again you miss the point. I am not interested in US rates. I am here in Argentina. I just mentioned what I found out about US rates since you brought it up. HEalth insurance in Argentina depends on age and plan. SOme people pay a lot more than $750 a month. There is a public health system here but it is very poor. I am sure you know that. Anyone who has a full time job has, by law, private health insurance. If your life is at stake, you want to go to a decent private clinic here, even if it means spending your life savings. Your life should be worth more. Anyway, what is happening in the US, Australia, Europe or anywhere else is not the issue. What matters is what is happening here.
Surgiiiii now that you have exposed youself as a Public Health critic.Tell us how you know it's bad. Better speak with some real credentials because I will eat you alive. Give facts, incidents and real data. Speak well little man.
 

sergio

Registered
First of all, I've been in several public hospitals, including the Fernandez which is generally considered the best. There are some good doctors - in fact you can sometimes find some of the same doctors who also work in good private clinics. The problem is underfunding which leads to inadequate facilities and a huge volume of patients to attend. If you break a bone or have some other not too serious emergency, the Fenandez will probably be OK. If something more serious happens that requires more radical treatment, you might have a big problem. How do I know these things? I base it mostly on conversations with quite a few doctors I know here. One doctor told me that his father is a surgeon in Formosa. The hospital did not have the basics such as surgical instruments, The surgeon had to go out and buy his own. Argentina has a public hospital system that is much needed and it is true that many people get treated free. I am not disputing that. It is, however, a very overtaxed system with poor facilities, overworked and underpaid doctors. As I said, everyone with a full time job has private hospital coverage and those who don't pay for private care, if they can afford it. The public system basically serves the poor which it does as best it can. I hope this answers your questions and there is no need for insults. I am pointing out facts based on experience. That is all. If you think the public system is adequate, fine. You don't have to use private clinics,. I don't know Porteños, though, who think the public system is adequate. And, again, we are talking about Argentina and not other countries.
 

brij

Just Joined
Does anyone out there have feedback on the expat insurance health plans? I am considering them and wanted to see if anyone had personal experience with them.
 

citygirl

Registered
Actually, my feedback on public hospitals is exactly the opposite - in the event of a serious, critical injury, you may be better served in a public hospital as they see a lot more of those type of cases. It is also the reason that the top grads from med school usually do their residency in a public hospital. However, for long-term care, you def want to be in a private hospital.

Re: healthcare - I know a lot of people who have the medicus plan through baexpats. Feedback has been generally good. Not the best plan but covers everything and by far the cheapest. I have Swiss Med, pay 350 pesos a month as it has int'l coverage (which I don't think Medicus does but I could be wrong)
 
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