health insurance rate up

#22
But there is an age limit...as I was looking into the expatconnection...and most private insurance companys here do have an age limit, including Medicus...think it was 62 and/or 65...we were turned down by several due to my husbands age! Finally we found one with the help of a woman that knew of a company that did cover older clients, and we got coverage with Centro Medico Peridon, sp on that last word.

Our insurance just went up 10%, and has more than doubled in the last year...but you can't be without it...so what can you do, nothing!
 
#23
EvergreenGal said:
But there is an age limit...as I was looking into the expatconnection...and most private insurance companys here do have an age limit, including Medicus...think it was 62 and/or 65...we were turned down by several due to my husbands age! Finally we found one with the help of a woman that knew of a company that did cover older clients, and we got coverage with Centro Medico Peridon, sp on that last word.

Our insurance just went up 10%, and has more than doubled in the last year...but you can't be without it...so what can you do, nothing!
Centro Medico Pueyrredon
Av. Pueyrredón 1341 - Tel.: 4827.8277.
 
#24
When I left my last official job in the US in 2006, I maintained health coverage for me and my partner under COBRA for a year. The cost was then USD 880/month, plus co-pays, deductibles, and limits of coverage. No dental or optical care, and limited drug benefits. Friends tell me that the cost of equivalent coverage there (New York City) has risen to over USD 1000/month for a couple in their 50s.

After reviewing a number of plans here, we chose OSDE 310, and we've been very happy with it. At ARS 740/month for each of us (1480 total), it's not cheap, but it covers everything, and our experience with the private medical system here has been extremely positive.

For the equivalent of USD 385/month, we have access to the best physicians, diagnostic facilities, and hospitals on the South American continent. My doctor has ordered tests and treatments that would take weeks to schedule in the US and would require substantial co-pays, but were done here in a day or two, at no out-of-pocket cost. When my appendix burst one weekend last summer, I received care at a level I can't imagine in the US.

It's very hard to compare health care systems between the US and Argentina. The Argentine public health system provides care at no cost for everyone - something simply not available in the US. It's been underfunded for at least 40 years, and the facilities are outdated, but by all reports the staffs are excellent, at least here in the capital, and they do a very good job.

For those of us who can afford it - at least for now jaja - there is the private, for-profit health care system that's superior to anything generally available in the US.

I say "generally available," because there are specialty facilities for the very wealthy at some top-notch hospitals in the US that possibly provide comparable, perhaps even more excellent care. But these are accessible by only the top 0.5% of US wage earners, which never included me, so I have no personal experience to compare.
 
#25
jimdepalermo said:
When I left my last official job in the US in 2006, I maintained health coverage for me and my partner under COBRA for a year. The cost was then USD 880/month, plus co-pays, deductibles, and limits of coverage. No dental or optical care, and limited drug benefits. Friends tell me that the cost of equivalent coverage there (New York City) has risen to over USD 1000/month for a couple in their 50s.

After reviewing a number of plans here, we chose OSDE 310, and we've been very happy with it. At ARS 740/month for each of us (1480 total), it's not cheap, but it covers everything, and our experience with the private medical system here has been extremely positive.

For the equivalent of USD 385/month, we have access to the best physicians, diagnostic facilities, and hospitals on the South American continent. My doctor has ordered tests and treatments that would take weeks to schedule in the US and would require substantial co-pays, but were done here in a day or two, at no out-of-pocket cost. When my appendix burst one weekend last summer, I received care at a level I can't imagine in the US.

It's very hard to compare health care systems between the US and Argentina. The Argentine public health system provides care at no cost for everyone - something simply not available in the US. It's been underfunded for at least 40 years, and the facilities are outdated, but by all reports the staffs are excellent, at least here in the capital, and they do a very good job.

For those of us who can afford it - at least for now jaja - there is the private, for-profit health care system that's superior to anything generally available in the US.

I say "generally available," because there are specialty facilities for the very wealthy at some top-notch hospitals in the US that possibly provide comparable, perhaps even more excellent care. But these are accessible by only the top 0.5% of US wage earners, which never included me, so I have no personal experience to compare.
Seems to be that both your US and Argentina plans are a lot more expensive then what most pay in Europe

P.S. there are public hospitals who probally do a better job then for minor treatments but for that you need a local you trust to advice you
 
#26
FYI, I heard from a Swiss Medical rep that due to increases in Health Unions Wages, all health insurance companies in Argentina will have an increase in their monthly premiums of 12% in September. Swiss Medical requires a 6-month contract initially and then afterwards it's month-to-month. Not sure about OSDE but they also get good reviews in general.
 
#27
BlahBlah said:
Seems to be that both your US and Argentina plans are a lot more expensive then what most pay in Europe
Yup. Absolutely the case.

BlahBlah said:
P.S. there are public hospitals who probally do a better job then for minor treatments but for that you need a local you trust to advice you
All my Argentine friends advise staying clear of the public hospitals as long as I can afford to do so. They all rely either on good Obras Sociales or buy Prepagos, the same as we do.
 
#28
I am paying U$S 2280 PER MONTH for POS to the crooks at Aetna, 2 people in good health. I started with them at 760 per person in 2000. They raise an average of $300+ each year. My wife just recently added insurance in Argentina (visit very often). The cost is AR$ 700 per month.
 

amat

Active Member
#30
Well, it seems the increase never happened on my Medicus plan. I got a letter saying it would go up in September and Dec. However, my september bill had an extra x% added and then the same x% deducted on the same bill. So the price didn't change. Maybe it's something to do with the Expats group rate?

Just wondering if others had the same.
 
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