Interrogated by customs on flight out of Rosario. Why?

steveinbsas

Registered
As long as I never stay past 90 days in one visit, does it matter?
Have you been staying more than a total of 180 days in any twelve month period (365 consecutive days)?

Technically, that might be a violation of the I-94 (aka tourist visa), even though they may not have mentioned it to you.

If you have done so repeatedly, perhaps you should consider yourself fortunate.

Of course if you're married to an Argentine you could apply for permanent residency, but if you have income and assets abroad they would be subject to taxation in Argentina.

That's undoubtedly one good reason to stick with the "tourist"visa as long as possible.
 

RichardP

Active Member
You've just experienced a little power tripping which some officials get off on. They just want to see you sweat making you think you'll miss your flight. Best to remain cool and calm in these circumstances.

Gabacho is probably more common than gringo nowadays with Mexicans. Chileans do like to use gringo though.
 
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nikad

Registered
Have you been staying more than a total of 180 days in any twelve month period (365 consecutive days)?

Technically, that might be a violation of the I-94 (aka tourist visa), even though they may not have mentioned it to you.

If you have done so repeatedly, perhaps you should consider yourself fortunate.

Of course if you're married to an Argentine you could apply for permanent residency, but if you have income and assets abroad they would be subject to taxation in Argentina.

That's undoubtedly one good reason to stick with the "tourist"visa as long as possible.
well, he is married to an Arg citizen, so they should not mess with him. In any case Fiscal it would be a good idea to travel with a copy of your marriage certificate.
 

MikeB12

Member
Some destinations get more scrutiny than others. Panama is a hot spot for off shore accounts. You were leaving from the narco capital of Argentina. Could have been that. All we can do is speculate.
 

florence

Newcomer
I am an American (norteamericana) married to an Argentino and I am commonly called gringa. At first I was offended, but it was carefully and repeatedly explained to me that this is just a descriptive word for a foreigner from Europe or North America and not intended as an insult. After all, the Argentinos call each other Gordo, Flaco, Viejo, Negro, etc. In the family, I am affectionately La Tia Gringa, but it is not just family. On our block in Balvanera, when I am not around the local merchants routinely ask my husband "Donde esta la gringa?"
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
After waiting in line and passing security like everyone else, I flashed my passport to the customs official when it's my turn. A guy in a suit comes over, takes me out of the line, and makes me stand in a corner. I asked why. He says "Argentinians only!" very rudely and says "Brazilians here." I say I'm a gringo and he just ignores me. After another twenty minutes of standing in a corner alone, he directs me to a specific booth where the woman grills me on my entry and exit dates. She can't read the stamps correctly so I have to walk her through my entries and exists in EZE. Then she asks what my business is here, why so many exits and entries and I explain. She then randomly asks if my wife is Argentinian or "Mexican" which dumbfounded me. Like why is that relevant, and why Mexican of all nationalities (I do not have a Mexican accent or any native Spanish accent when speaking).

Never had so many problems trying to *leave* Argentina.
They suspected you might be a mule. Rosario is, nowadays, the Medellin of Argentina.

Regarding customs, your nationality is irrelevant. If you live here over 180 days a year, you are under the local tax law.
 
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steveinbsas

Registered
This:
Regarding customs, your nationality is irrelevant. If you live here over 180 days a year, you are under the local tax law.
Appears to be a reply to this:
Have you been staying more than a total of 180 days in any twelve month period (365 consecutive days)?

Technically, that might be a violation of the I-94 (aka tourist visa), even though they may not have mentioned it to you.

If you have done so repeatedly, perhaps you should consider yourself fortunate.

Of course if you're married to an Argentine you could apply for permanent residency, but if you have income and assets abroad they would be subject to taxation in Argentina..
I know that "customs" aka the ADUANA is part of AFIP, but I thought the ADUNA is concerned with imports and exports and AFIP with income taxes, as well as the bienes personales (asset) tax.

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but just to clarify for English speaking readers, would it also be accurate to say?:

"Regarding AFIP, your residency status is irrelevant. If you live here over 180 days a year, you are under the local tax law."
 
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