Motorbike and helicopter lessons

Gringoboy

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GS, I would certainly love to know of bike driving schools in BA.
I for one couldn't find any; and considering how many bikes are on the road, one has to ask...how did they learn?
Dumb question probably.
 

GS_Dirtboy

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I've been out of the riding community here for almost 4 years so I'm not up to speed on the current schools. There is (or was) a BMW shop in Olivos. I would go there, first. BMW riders tend to be pretty fanatical about training and protective gear. It's part of the culture. Just like riding around in leather chaps, a thong, and a beanie helmet is part of the Harley culture. :)
 

BrooklynStandUp

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GS_Dirtboy said:
I started and ran the first motorcycle safety school in Mendoza in 2006. Got tired of watching my friends go down so I rented out the supermarket parking lot one Sunday per month. Used the US Motorcycle Safety Foundation's program as a basis and added some stuff that was geared to experienced riders. Most of us were on big BMW's but you can easily learn on a 250. I'm partial to BMW's program, both street and off-road.

I highly suggest you go to an accredited school. Having non-professionals teach you is a really good way to learn bad habits (that they think are correct because it seems logical). Seriously, don't do that.

I took the MSF course in the Bronx and highly recommend it for anyone just starting out. I had some experience on dirtbikes from when I was a kid and did a ton of reading about riding before I got to the course, but logging practice hours on the 250's gave me a good deal of confidence to buy a bike and not kill myself on the beginner unfriendly streets of NYC. The insurance discount didn't suck either.

That said, I don't think learning the basics from an experienced rider is necessarily a bad idea simply because they are not accredited by an official governing body. A little common sense goes a long way. I've ridden with guys who would blaze a blunt and stunt their GSXR's on the BQE, and I've also ridden with guys who were extremely serious and could make a Ninja 250 look like an R1 at the track. Obviously the former is probably not who you want to give you lessons. Sure, if you're trying to master how to get from flat out in top gear down to 2nd while braking, rev matching your downshifts, and picking the best line before you hit the apex, then you should probably holler at Keith Code for a minute. If you're just learning how to make the bike go and how fundamental braking and shifting works, you might not have to drop a bunch of coin on a proper course. There's nothing you can't read about on the internet, but as with everything in life, experience is king. No course is going to prepare you for the decision you have to make when a pedestrian isn't looking and steps out in front of you, or when you're leaned over on the highway and hit a bump and the front end comes down and starts wobbling on you. Ultimately it depends on the rider. For me there was definitely an excessive amount of "if you drink and ride, you're going to have a bad time" videos for my taste, but since the course is for people from all walks of life, I understand that's a good thing.

Anyway, I respect and think it's awesome that you started the courses in Mendoza. I'm a little sensitive to broad generalizations in the motorcycle community. Like when people tell you, "Bro, definitely get a shitty bike as your first one because you WILL drop it." Sure, maybe... maybe not...
 

Gringoboy

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This is my first bike and I've dropped it once and been sideswiped once.
No major damage except a rib and a little ego.
I got back on though and have more respect for my surroundings than before.
True, experience is king.
 

kwalarking

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BrooklynStandUp said:
kwalarking, if you can't find any official options that work for you, and you have a bike, I'd be willing to show you the basics if you're up for it. I had a zx6-r in NYC for several years and rode the shit out of it in all 5 boroughs and in the mountains upstate. You wouldn't have to pay me or anything. I would just enjoy sharing some knowledge. Cheers.
Thank you very much. It's a shame I don't have a bike!
 

kwalarking

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Gringoboy said:
I would help too.
I have a 250 which is reasonable to handle and learn on.
Lots of open spaces where I live, especially during the week by the riverside road which follows the Tren de la Costa route.
Weekends not recommended due to heavy traffic.
There are also quite a few areas off the main road for training purposes.
Thank you very much. I currently work from 8 am to 7 pm on weekdays. So I would be only be able to learn on weekends.
 

Gringoboy

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kwalarking said:
Thank you very much. I currently work from 8 am to 7 pm on weekdays. So I would be only be able to learn on weekends.

Do you know anything about riding bikes?
I mean, have you been on one before?
Don't mean to sound rude at all, but it would be handy to know.
 

kwalarking

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Gringoboy said:
Do you know anything about riding bikes?
I mean, have you been on one before?
Don't mean to sound rude at all, but it would be handy to know.
I have been on one many times but only on the back seat!
 
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