Mrs. K. in the big apple!

#1
Take a look at this....Will be interesting to see how this turns out!
U.S. group protests Argentina's Nasdaq bell ring

9/20/2008 11:10:01 AM
Comments (0)

Associated Press
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- A U.S. lobbying group is protesting the decision to have Argentina's president ring the opening bell at the Nasdaq stock exchange on Monday.
American Task Force Argentina says the South American nation's government "has defied hundreds of judgments" in U.S. courts and still owes investors billions following its debt default.
Executive Director Robert Raben said Friday that President Cristina Fernandez "doesn't deserve the honor" of ringing the Nasdaq bell. The group said it has sent nearly 30,000 protest letters to the exchange and the Departments of State and Treasury.
Argentina defaulted on US$95 billion in 2001. Most was restructured in 2005. But U.S. investors say they are still owed more than US$3 billion
 
#5
Maybe she'll notice how much better the sidewalks are there. How people have change...and mufflers..and busses dont let you out in the middle of several lanes of traffic. And, well, she'll probably be too busy with her suitcases of cash from foreign leaders to notice too much or to feel uncomfortable being a representative of a country that still owes incredible sums of money, deadbeat if you will, hence the reason some wanted to deny her the honor of riging the bell on Wall St. or perhaps it was simply that they thought she'd jinx things more than they seem to be already.
Meanwhile, the pot is boiling back in Arg. and the place is set for another meltdown. The last time there were kidnappings every 5 minutes or so and real nasty violence in the streets. I hope she puts the suitcase of cash in a safe place. She might have to live her life abroad as San Martin did.
 
#6
Honestly, the people in this forum really don't have much right to criticize Cristina K. ESPECIALLY if you are from the United States. Like all presidents, she has her opinions, and maybe has made a few mistakes, like every human being, but she does act in the best interests of her country. Cristina shouldn't be blamed for the economic problems that happened in 2001. Crisitina wasn't president at that time. That would be like blaming George Bush for the Cuban missle crisis during the Kennedy era. The real problem here is that the US is way to arrogant to admit that they destroyed their own economy and made some of the most foolish and risky credit decisions ever known in the history of the US banking system. And I am speaking from first hand experience. I am originally from New York and I worked for one of the largest mortgage companies during the whole subprime debacle. What these banks considered loans at that time were an absolute joke. Almost everything was fraudulent and it was all done with the management's and the investment bank's blessing. Now they all have to pay the piper for being so greedy as those same managers are now long term unemployed and the investment banks are bankrupt. Any employee that tried to make a sound credit decision at that time was considered anti-business and getting in the way of progress. Here in Argentina the banks are very careful as to who they extend credit to, everything you put on your application for credit MUST be proven true. Not exactly a difficult concept. Maybe the arrogant US banks could learn from Argentina this time and learn how to assess risk before giving out big sums of money to any guy on the street. What is being done in Argentine banks with credit are called sound lending practices and this will ensure the long term health and existence of the banking system and economic growth. Maybe not explosive growth, but reasonable and solid over time.
I have lived in Argentina for the past 1.5 years. I enjoy my life here, it's a lot less stressful than my life in New York. Yes, there are differences, but what did you expect coming to a country on another continent? If you want things the same as in your home country my advice is to stay there.
If Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner reads this by any chance, I would like to tell her that I love Argentina, I think the people and the customs are great here. I hope you enjoy your trip to New York. Don't be afraid to speak your mind. Ring that bell in the stock market before the entire world and show us what you are all about.
Signed, David Glen, a proud Argentine resident
 
#7
David, I, too, like -- even love -- Argentina, the land, my Argentine friends and cousins, their ways of life. And I agree that Sra. F. de K. can't be blamed for problems inherited from predecessors, whether those be broken sidewalks or others' broken promises. But such problems as she can control, such as her own participation in Argentina's now notorious culture of governmental corruption, should be laid squarely on her doorstep.
Argentina is a wonderful place, but it, as any place in this world, is flawed. Some of those flaws can be repaired.
 
#8
Well said David! I am constantly surprised at some of the board members and their constant negative attitudes toward Argentina. I cannot understand why a person would move to a different country and hope things are similar to their home country. Also, if things aren't going so well, why would they stay in their new country? I admire Stan for deciding he had enough and moved away. Maybe this should be a separate forum post?
 

ghost

Registered
#10
"Davidglen77" said:
Honestly, the people in this forum really don't have much right to criticize Cristina K. ESPECIALLY if you are from the United States. Like all presidents, she has her opinions, and maybe has made a few mistakes, like every human being, but she does act in the best interests of her country. Cristina shouldn't be blamed for the economic problems that happened in 2001. Crisitina wasn't president at that time. That would be like blaming George Bush for the Cuban missle crisis during the Kennedy era. The real problem here is that the US is way to arrogant to admit that they destroyed their own economy and made some of the most foolish and risky credit decisions ever known in the history of the US banking system. And I am speaking from first hand experience. I am originally from New York and I worked for one of the largest mortgage companies during the whole subprime debacle. What these banks considered loans at that time were an absolute joke. Almost everything was fraudulent and it was all done with the management's and the investment bank's blessing. Now they all have to pay the piper for being so greedy as those same managers are now long term unemployed and the investment banks are bankrupt. Any employee that tried to make a sound credit decision at that time was considered anti-business and getting in the way of progress. Here in Argentina the banks are very careful as to who they extend credit to, everything you put on your application for credit MUST be proven true. Not exactly a difficult concept. Maybe the arrogant US banks could learn from Argentina this time and learn how to assess risk before giving out big sums of money to any guy on the street. What is being done in Argentine banks with credit are called sound lending practices and this will ensure the long term health and existence of the banking system and economic growth. Maybe not explosive growth, but reasonable and solid over time.
I have lived in Argentina for the past 1.5 years. I enjoy my life here, it's a lot less stressful than my life in New York. Yes, there are differences, but what did you expect coming to a country on another continent? If you want things the same as in your home country my advice is to stay there.
If Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner reads this by any chance, I would like to tell her that I love Argentina, I think the people and the customs are great here. I hope you enjoy your trip to New York. Don't be afraid to speak your mind. Ring that bell in the stock market before the entire world and show us what you are all about.
Signed, David Glen, a proud Argentine resident
You have to be kidding!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! No right. Learn something?