OverStaying in argentina due to COVID-19

Bajo_cero2

Registered
Agreed, especially since a lot of them are Bolivians anyway, who technically can legally get residency at the drop of a hat due to MERCOSUR, they just haven't bothered with it. I have a couple of acquiantances who are Sengalese as well (no idea why they chose to come here still but anyway...) and they have no practical way to get legal status but would love it. If you're not going to deport them, as the authorities here have been reluctant to do for decades now, why not give them residency so that they can get bank accounts and perhaps start paying taxes?
There is was no deportation for citizens of Mercosur. So, to apply for a residency was optional (I'm not updated about this as soon as I do not do Immigration law).
The National Constitutions does not accepts the legal residency, in fact, arts. 14, 20, 25 and 28 abolish it.
The legal residency is a simple pass alike the passes we see now in quarantine.
It is a medieval military system when people was attached to the land as serfs.
Its origin is in the Quran where it is called halal (legal) while in Christendom we talk about inhabitants. The legal resident is who submitted to the sharia and it is the evidence of a partial conversion to Islam (Sura 9:29).
As far as Argentina has freedom of religion, Mercosur citizens can choose to apply or not. And you can choose between two apply as a halal resident or to citizenship as an inhabitant, a category you find in the Bible.
In recent times the III Reich was, also, a community State, racial instead of religious. The legal residence was the probe that you belong to the ethnic community. It was a racial certificate.
For the local nazism, the Argentine superior race was a blend of native (Spaniards married native women and / or had harems), Spanish (mostly converted judes), Italian and French and this is why you cannot apply for legal residency so easy as Mercosur Citizens. Meanwhile you look down on Bolivians because most of them are native Americans, the rule makers despise you as undesirable migration and privilege them because they brothers in blood.
 

dsp27

Registered
There is was no deportation for citizens of Mercosur. So, to apply for a residency was optional (I'm not updated about this as soon as I do not do Immigration law).
The National Constitutions does not accepts the legal residency, in fact, arts. 14, 20, 25 and 28 abolish it.
The legal residency is a simple pass alike the passes we see now in quarantine.
It is a medieval military system when people was attached to the land as serfs.
Its origin is in the Quran where it is called halal (legal) while in Christendom we talk about inhabitants. The legal resident is who submitted to the sharia and it is the evidence of a partial conversion to Islam (Sura 9:29).
As far as Argentina has freedom of religion, Mercosur citizens can choose to apply or not. And you can choose between two apply as a halal resident or to citizenship as an inhabitant, a category you find in the Bible.
In recent times the III Reich was, also, a community State, racial instead of religious. The legal residence was the probe that you belong to the ethnic community. It was a racial certificate.
For the local nazism, the Argentine superior race was a blend of native (Spaniards married native women and / or had harems), Spanish (mostly converted judes), Italian and French and this is why you cannot apply for legal residency so easy as Mercosur Citizens. Meanwhile you look down on Bolivians because most of them are native Americans, the rule makers despise you as undesirable migration and privilege them because they brothers in blood.
I was wondering if Migraciones are still processing ongoing residency applications where the applicant has already had the "cita" and has had the original documents checked? Generally, all documents have been digitalized and the reviewing person has a digital signature, so firmar la disposicion is possible from home? Or have Migraciones stopped ALL procedures even when technically they can work and alleviate some of the bottleneck that had existed from before?
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
I was wondering if Migraciones are still processing ongoing residency applications where the applicant has already had the "cita" and has had the original documents checked? Generally, all documents have been digitalized and the reviewing person has a digital signature, so firmar la disposicion is possible from home? Or have Migraciones stopped ALL procedures even when technically they can work and alleviate some of the bottleneck that had existed from before?
I made that question at Migraciones the last day they worked.
They said they cannot logg in at home.
So, I don’t think they are processing your application.
They are working on tracking possible Covid-19 infected travelers.
 

Alby

Registered
Now that the airlines are prohibited from selling flights until September, the situation we have had on the table (tourist visas expire and cannot be renewed, residency applications are rejected in ultima instancia, but the affected people have no way of leaving the country) comes clearly into view. Could Migraciones detain such people and hold them until deportation via flight becomes possible? If not, what other options does the law provide to ensure Migracions treat these people justly?
 

dsp27

Registered
I made that question at Migraciones the last day they worked.
They said they cannot logg in at home.
So, I don’t think they are processing your application.
They are working on tracking possible Covid-19 infected travelers.
I have no pending application but would need to apply for an extension in a few months as mine expires in August. Do they still require that one waits 60 days before the expiration date of recidencia to start the application in Radex?
 

dsp27

Registered
Now that the airlines are prohibited from selling flights until September, the situation we have had on the table (tourist visas expire and cannot be renewed, residency applications are rejected in ultima instancia, but the affected people have no way of leaving the country) comes clearly into view. Could Migraciones detain such people and hold them until deportation via flight becomes possible? If not, what other options does the law provide to ensure Migracions treat these people justly?
It's not entirely clear if there will be no commercial flights to/from/within Argentina before 1 September. The restriction it seems is only for tickets issued in Argentina. So American, United, etc. could still sell tickets though their office in the US. The resolution does not prohibit flights till September and if you read the explanation by the authorities that's clarified. It also states that this policy will be reviewed every 2 weeks and if conditions have changed it may be revised. Still this will definitely cause US airlines to reduce even further their flights to ARG. Probably to only 2-3 a week, and not before late June. Obviously, there's a chance they cancel all of them altogether if there's no demand. And ultimately, the ARG government would have to authorize the lifting of the commercial flights ban that is still in place and is a separate policy from the "anticipated sale" ban from yesterday.
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Bajo_cero2

Registered
I have no pending application but would need to apply for an extension in a few months as mine expires in August. Do they still require that one waits 60 days before the expiration date of recidencia to start the application in Radex?
Read the previous post about the suspension on deadlines and extensions.
 

dsp27

Registered
Read the previous post about the suspension on deadlines and extensions.
Are you suggesting that my temporary residency that expires in august is now extended by 1-2 months? So instead of expiring on 1 Aug it's now expiring around the 1 October?
 

ventanilla

Registered
Now that the airlines are prohibited from selling flights until September, the situation we have had on the table (tourist visas expire and cannot be renewed, residency applications are rejected in ultima instancia, but the affected people have no way of leaving the country) comes clearly into view. Could Migraciones detain such people and hold them until deportation via flight becomes possible? If not, what other options does the law provide to ensure Migracions treat these people justly?
Even before the crisis, Migraciones didn't deport people very often unless they were stopped at a point of entry or criminals. That definitely will not happen.
 
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