President Sanchez of Spain Visits Bs. As.

Redpossum

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Be proud. At least you're more "native" than Elizabeth Warren.
Well, thank you, but TBH I'm not proud or embarrassed or anything. To me it's a big "so what?", a total non-issue. I'm just a typical American.

Seriously, aren't there more important issues for us to deal with? Like, for one example, the fact that mega-billionaires such as Bezos and Musk and Soros pay almost zero income tax? Or maybe the fact that the Japanese are turning the Pacific Ocean into a radioactive holding pond? Who shagged who seven generations ago seems highly irrelevant to me.

Now I suppose someone will lecture me on my "white privilege".
 

semigoodlookin

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Well, thank you, but TBH I'm not proud or embarrassed or anything. To me it's a big "so what?", a total non-issue. I'm just a typical American.

Seriously, aren't there more important issues for us to deal with? Like, for one example, the fact that mega-billionaires such as Bezos and Musk and Soros pay almost zero income tax? Or maybe the fact that the Japanese are turning the Pacific Ocean into a radioactive holding pond? Who shagged who seven generations ago seems highly irrelevant to me.
You only say that becase...

Now I suppose someone will lecture me on my "white privilege".
... Oh wait.
 

QuilmesSlo

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Whether it is or it isn't is besides the point. The points are:

1. Argentina never was and will never be be a pure white European country, either culturally or genetically, no matter how badly people like you try to erase or distort history. Argentina will always be melting pot of different cultures, including Amerindian and black.
2. Mexico and Brazil are not ethnically and culturally monolithic (Indians and Jungle). They both have massive influx of immigrants from all over the world.
3. There is no "racial exceptionalism" in Argentina. Argentina is as unique and special as every other country in the region. Not better or worse, just different.
4. Too bad there is no time machine to take you back to those 1930s Nazi rallies in Luna Park. You are stuck on the here and now. Too bad for you.

Argentina has an exceptional heritage, much the same as Bolivia does. They are unique.

Calling me a nazi is a poor excuse for an argument.

For me, I can go each week in BA and hear the dialect of my grandparent's village in Eastern Europe, and eat our dishes. I cannot do that anywhere else in Latin America, and increasingly not in the US, either.
 

Alby

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This just stumbled upon, in a brief autobiography of Borges where he describes his family's decision to visit Spain in 1919 on the way back from five years in Geneva:

"We decided to go home, but to spend a year or so in Spain first. Spain at that time was slowly being discovered by Argentines. Until then, even eminent writers like Leopoldo Lugones and Ricardo Güiraldes deliberately left Spain out of their European travels. This was no whim. In Buenos Aires, Spaniards always held menial jobs—as domestic servants, waiters, and laborers—or were small tradesmen, and we Argentines never thought of ourselves as Spanish. We had, in fact, left off being Spaniards in 1816, when we declared our independence from Spain. When, as a boy, I read Prescott’s Conquest of Peru, it amazed me to find that he portrayed the conquistadors in a romantic way. To me, descended from certain of these officials, they were an uninteresting lot...But though Spanish was our language and we came mostly of Spanish and Portuguese blood, my own family never thought of our trip in terms of going back to Spain after an absence of some three centuries."
 

Redpossum

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And yet, 30 years later, Perón sent Evita as his ambassador to Spain, along with huge shipments of food.

"At a time marked by the end of World War II, Argentine President Juan Perón sent 400,000 tonnes of wheat, 120,000 tonnes of corn, 8,000 tonnes of cooking oil, 10,000 tonnes of lentils, 20,000 tonnes of frozen meat, 5,000 tonnes of cured meat and 50,000 boxes of eggs to Spain."
 

Redpossum

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More to do with Peron's love and admiration for Franco.
If you actually read the article, it discusses that accusation, and debunks it. Perón aided Spain for two reasons.
One, to help the Spanish people, who were starving.
Two, because it gave him leverage to demand concessions from Franco, such as canceling the execution of Juana Doña. To quote from the article -

...there was a crucial moment during her time in Spain, and that was when she told Franco to either pardon Juana Doña, the last woman condemned to death under the regime, or else she would pull the aid from Argentina.

And Eva's intervention worked, because Doña's fate was reduced to a prison sentence.

Doña's son Alexis Mesón said he is "eternally grateful" for Eva's actions, adding that it was thanks to her he got to spend another 55 years with his mother.

Mesón was nine years old when, with the help of his aunt and grandmother, he wrote a letter to Eva via the Argentine embassy in Madrid.

"Eva gave my the gift of my mother for another 50 odd years," Mesón told Efe. "And not any mother, but, aside from all the differences, a mother who was also historic, given that she became a reference in the communist and feminist fight in this country.


It is unfortunate that your unrelentingly negative view of Perón and peronism renders you seemingly unable to see the positive side of many things that Perón accomplished. Certainly he had feet of clay, as do we all, but he was not a bad person.
 

FrankPintor

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Some of the best and worst of the forum on display in this thread: interesting historical insights (thanks Alby and Redpossum), personal experience (thanks QuilmesSlo), and of course a very few unrelentingly negative posters reaching immediately for ad-hominem arguments and accusations of Nazism.

I'm only a bystander, recently arrived in Argentina ("descendido del avión" if you like) and curious to know where Argentinians get their superiority complex from (and also where all the black people went). Please keep the positive contributions coming.
 

semigoodlookin

Registered
Some of the best and worst of the forum on display in this thread: interesting historical insights (thanks Alby and Redpossum), personal experience (thanks QuilmesSlo), and of course a very few unrelentingly negative posters reaching immediately for ad-hominem arguments and accusations of Nazism.

I'm only a bystander, recently arrived in Argentina ("descendido del avión" if you like) and curious to know where Argentinians get their superiority complex from (and also where all the black people went). Please keep the positive contributions coming.
Do Argentine's really have a superiotiry complex? The people I contact with the most are family, and I do not see them thinking they are superior. I don't socialize a lot so I am interested how does the superiority complex manifest in day-to-day life.
 
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