Rentista Visa

Anna3313

Registered
Hi there, with regards to your enquiry, you need to know that the RENTISTA visa is a very difficult visa to secure. You need to show that you have assets or sufficient wealth in your home country (certified by a CPA) and that you assume the committment of transferring certain amount of money every month to cover your stay (nowadays it´s AR$ 30,000 monthly). In addition to these accounting documents, you need to gather a general requirement for all adults which is securing a Criminal Background Check Certificate corresponding to the countries where you have lived for more than 1 year over the past 3 years. If you only lived in Colombia, then you will only need to submit your Colombian Police Clearance Certificate.

A couple of things to have in mind:

1) If your wife has a MERCOSUR Nationality, she can apply for a 2 year visa based on her nationality, and if you have sufficient proof that you are married (Marriage Certificate), you can enjoy the same benefits of this 2-year visa because you would be a DEPENDANT. Dependants are allowed to WORK in Argentina. For MERCOSUR Nationals, The WORK PERMIT is OPEN, meaning that it´s not restricted to only one employer, and it does not require a previous Company Sponsorship.

2) The MERCOSUR VISA can either be secured at the Embassy or IN COUNTRY, by entering Argentina as a tourist, and then requesting an appointment to switch the Tourism Status into a MERCOSUR VISA.

3) The Argentine Embassy in Colombia offers the TOURISM VISA STAMP to those who are in Colombia who actually NEED a visa to Argentina, For example, Indian National living in Colombia who wishes to travel to ARG. This is not your case, you don´t need to go to the Embassy for a Tourism Visa, you can just fly to ARG and enter as a Tourist.

4) Once you enter the country, they stamp a 90-day entry permission. Filing a Visa Request may take you approx. 7 business days in total, so you have plenty of time to convert your status.. It is of the essence that you bring all the documents that the Immigration Authority will require.

5) I strongly recommend not to go for the RENTISTA VISA as there are no clear rules about it, the visa analysis period may take longer, and the rejection rate will be much higher. I recommend that you focus on being a Dependant using your wife´s MERCOSUR VISA (for that, BOTH OF YOU need to apply for the VISA TOGETHER), or think some other alternatives which may require a more thorough discussion (i.e. setting up your own entity and sponsor your own employment, find a friend who might use his company to sponsor you, etc etc).

6) Any and all official foreign documents such as: Marriage Certificate, Criminal Background Check Certificate, need to be legalized with the APOSTILLE. Without it, the document CANNOT be submitted in Argentina. If the document is not in Spanish, then it needs to be Translated ONLY by Argentine Public Translators. Don´t waste time and money getting them translated outside of ARG.

I hope you find this info useful! Good Luck!
Is the Rentista Visa completely out of the question? It's the only VISA I qualify to apply for. In your experience what are the cases most likely to get approved? Would proof (from the bank) of a trust that deposits a certain amount (over the 33,000 ask) into a trust account that I'd transfer here to Buenos Aires help me at all? I've been led down a fairly arduous road trying to stay but I really want to at least try to gain residency before giving up, packing up and moving away. My hope is to get the Rentista Visa and renew it three years to gain permanent residency. Thank you so much for your advice and help. I am not Mercosur, I'm from the U.S. I will have my FBI background check paperwork, birth certificate and all requirements from my home country apostilled and legalized/translated here on my arrival back in April. I realize it's a long shot but it's my last shot. The career I'm in...jobs don't sponsor for (restaurant industry/sommelier) and school is out of the question for me. I'm not married or dating an Argentine. So anything that you might know to make my case for Rentista the strongest it can be would be terrific.
 

Cassiopeia

Registered
Is the Rentista Visa completely out of the question? It's the only VISA I qualify to apply for. In your experience what are the cases most likely to get approved? Would proof (from the bank) of a trust that deposits a certain amount (over the 33,000 ask) into a trust account that I'd transfer here to Buenos Aires help me at all? I've been led down a fairly arduous road trying to stay but I really want to at least try to gain residency before giving up, packing up and moving away. My hope is to get the Rentista Visa and renew it three years to gain permanent residency. Thank you so much for your advice and help. I am not Mercosur, I'm from the U.S. I will have my FBI background check paperwork, birth certificate and all requirements from my home country apostilled and legalized/translated here on my arrival back in April. I realize it's a long shot but it's my last shot. The career I'm in...jobs don't sponsor for (restaurant industry/sommelier) and school is out of the question for me. I'm not married or dating an Argentine. So anything that you might know to make my case for Rentista the strongest it can be would be terrific.
Hi Anna, it´s not impossible. It´s just a painful road. There are easier ways to explore before launching a Rentista application. Feel free to reach out to me. I will explain more options free of charge. Best!
 

TheDonald

Registered
I think Cassiopeia is right for the most part, but my experience has been a little different and the culture seems to have changed regards the Rentista Residency since 2F assumed power.

I have been pursuing the Residencia Rentista for about a year and I have two observations. First, despite trying to comply for a year, I have never gotten the 90-day Prorroga or whatever it's called. I have been called to Migraciones several times to explain my documents and never been offered it, despite acknowledgment that my effort at residency was sincere.

The passive income I am using is an unconventional investment and the guys at Migraciones that review this stuff didn't understand it. Each time they sent me back, I had my professional explain it in greater detail.

Another difficulty for me was the requirement that my bank account that receives the passive income be directly linked to my Argentine bank account. Surprisingly, this requirement was never mentioned on my last visit to Migraciones. The guy said, "OK. Now we've got what we're looking for. Get this last part notarized, apostilled and translated and your good to go." This is what I mean by there seems to have been a change in culture. Every visit before, the bank account link was mentioned and I was having a terrible time getting it done (don't ask why). But now, that requirement appears to have gone the way Macri (i.e. disappeared from view).

I have learned a lot about this process in the last year. I believe the structure you outline would pass. In my experience down there, the important thing is to have your heart in the right place, i.e. be sincerely trying to comply with their rules. I also let them know that Argentina is a great country and I am a guest and I am thankful for the opportunity to remain here. That has gone over well.

There are many highly informed people on this website. I don't have their breadth of knowledge. But I do have some current info on the Residencia Rentista. If I can help, let me know.
 

mlee

Registered
If your wife has a MERCOSUR Nationality, she can apply for a 2 year visa based on her nationality, and if you have sufficient proof that you are married (Marriage Certificate), you can enjoy the same benefits of this 2-year visa because you would be a DEPENDANT. Dependants are allowed to WORK in Argentina. For MERCOSUR Nationals, The WORK PERMIT is OPEN, meaning that it´s not restricted to only one employer, and it does not require a previous Company Sponsorship.

The MERCOSUR VISA can either be secured at the Embassy or IN COUNTRY, by entering Argentina as a tourist, and then requesting an appointment to switch the Tourism Status into a MERCOSUR VISA.
Thank you for this. So many helpful people on this forum. I was wondering from the beginning if there was a dependent based visa and now surprised this was not mentioned in responses to our inquiries at the Argentine embassy in Bogota. Nevertheless, is great news for me.

It could be more convenient to apply for a Mercosur visa in Buenos Aires than here in Colombia where we would need to travel from Barranquilla to Bogota for an interview. However, upon arrival in Buenos Aires, she will begin a research sabbatical at a university. Could she be violating a tourism visa if she immediately began "working" in a sabbatical status?

Any and all official foreign documents such as: Marriage Certificate, Criminal Background Check Certificate, need to be legalized with the APOSTILLE.
I believe they want a Criminal Background Check from the country in which I've been residing (8 years now in Colombia). Or does anyone know, are they in the habit of wanting an FBI report from a US citizen regardless?

Thanks again to everyone who has responded.
 
Last edited:

Bajo_cero2

Registered
Thank you for this. So many helpful people on this forum. I was wondering from the beginning if there was a dependent based visa and now surprised this was not mentioned in responses to our inquiries at the Argentine embassy in Bogota. Nevertheless, is great news for me.

It could be more convenient to apply for a Mercosur visa in Buenos Aires than here in Colombia where we would need to travel from Barranquilla to Bogota for an interview. However, upon arrival in Buenos Aires, she will begin a research sabbatical at a university. Could she be violating a tourism visa if she immediately began "working" in a sabbatical status?



I believe they want a Criminal Background Check from the country in which I've been residing (8 years now in Colombia). Or does anyone know, are they in the habit of wanting an FBI report from a US citizen regardless?

Thanks again to everyone who has responded.
The Mercosur visa is the best option because it is the only one that respects the National Constitution because you have to evidence you don’t have criminal records here and in Colombia. Go for it. But do it in Argentina. It is a lit faster.
 

mlee

Registered
But do it in Argentina. It is a lit faster.
And thank you too. Just one clarification: Are you referring to me? I would be applying as a dependent, based on my wife's Mercosur visa. As I mentioned above, I fear that if my wife received a Tourist visa stamp upon arrival while planning to apply for a Mercosur visa and immediately began to work in her research sabbatical at a university, she would be violating that Tourist visa. Then suppose she applies for a Mercosur at the Argentine Embassy here in Colombia, is it possible for me to apply as a dependent at the same time she applies?
 

Cassiopeia

Registered
Dear mlee, you have 2 alternatives to apply for the visa: 1) IN COUNTRY, or 2) At the CONSULATE of ARG in BOGOTA

If you choose option 1), you and your wife will enter ARG as tourists, and -once you are inside of ARG Territory- you will need to schedule an appointment to convert the tourism stamp into a MERCOSUR VISA (for her), and dependent visa for you.

If you choose option 2) you and your wife must schedule an appointment at the ARG Consulate to apply for MERCOSUR VISA. After a Consular interview, both of you should have the MERCOSUR visa stamped onto your passports.

The most conservative approach is to go for option 2, because you have 100% certainty that the visa has been granted at the Consular Interview. Basically, when you enter ARG after having the visa stamped, you are already doing it as a MERCOSUR RESIDENT. Once in Argentina, all you need to do is focusing on securing the ARG ID Card (DNI), which may take 3-4 weeks under this method.

Instead, if you go for option 1, you need to know that your MERCOSUR VISA is not approved right away. On the day of the visa appointment they will first give you and your spouse a PROVISORY RESIDENCY CERTIFICATE, which will be valid for 90 days while your visa is still under analysis. The visa should be approved within those 90 days, and -once done- your ARG ID will be automatically issued and delivered to your home address in ARG by the Official Post.

In summary, the IN COUNTRY option helps to travel to ARG fast as you can secure a PROVISORY RESIDENCY in 4-5 business days, but it has more scrutiny in the long run and more waiting time until you get the DNI. The Consular Approach is most conservative as the VISA IS FULLY approved by the CONSULATE before you enter the country. Getting the ID is much faster, however, it is true that not many people can wait for a consular interview to be scheduled as many times there is a BIG rush to fly to ARG.

I hope you find this information useful!

Take care
 

mlee

Registered
...option 1) ... a MERCOSUR VISA (for her), and dependent visa for you.

option 2) you and your wife must schedule an appointment at the ARG Consulate to apply for MERCOSUR VISA. After a Consular interview, both of you should have the MERCOSUR visa stamped onto your passports.
Option 2, the Consular visa:
On line 30 of the Mercosur consular visa application, it asks for the name of the applicant's spouse and information. And then it asks "Do they travel with you" "CONYUGE apellidos, nombres, nacionalidad, fecha de nacimiento, ¿viaja con usted?" This appears to be the sole indicator where the applicant requests that their spouse be included in the Mercosur Visa. (a "dependent"?) Is he (the spouse) then invited to the appointment? If so, it seems he should also have the supporting apostillied documents, but there doesn't seem to be any indication as such or additional application that should be used for the spouse.

Is the Visa por Reunificación Familiar the visa referred as "dependent" visa?
"A foreign spouse, ….. of a foreign person with permanent residence in Argentina is also eligible for a family reunification visa."

Thanks again, sorry for the confusion.
 

mlee

Registered
The more I examine the visas, I think the answer to my question is yes. For a former government employee, you look for exact terms and definitions. Short of that, the Family Reunification Visa logically appears to be for dependents and is probably referred to as a "dependent visa". Still, its description (A foreign spouse ... of a foreign person with permanent residence) makes it appear to be eligible only after a spouse has received permanent residence. Without your advice, I might not have thought to apply at the same time and expect a joint interview. All this help is extremely useful.

On a related note, as a former gov employee, I am well aware of people investing significant time and money into applications for all types of various permissions only to see their time and investments wasted and their progress delayed. Coming from the private sector before gov and knowing the road blocks (especially government), it was very disappointing to witness the common cold-hearted gov treatment. As well as the fear of making one simple mistake.
 

Gabrielg

Registered
I think Cassiopeia is right for the most part, but my experience has been a little different and the culture seems to have changed regards the Rentista Residency since 2F assumed power.

I have been pursuing the Residencia Rentista for about a year and I have two observations. First, despite trying to comply for a year, I have never gotten the 90-day Prorroga or whatever it's called. I have been called to Migraciones several times to explain my documents and never been offered it, despite acknowledgment that my effort at residency was sincere.

The passive income I am using is an unconventional investment and the guys at Migraciones that review this stuff didn't understand it. Each time they sent me back, I had my professional explain it in greater detail.

Another difficulty for me was the requirement that my bank account that receives the passive income be directly linked to my Argentine bank account. Surprisingly, this requirement was never mentioned on my last visit to Migraciones. The guy said, "OK. Now we've got what we're looking for. Get this last part notarized, apostilled and translated and your good to go." This is what I mean by there seems to have been a change in culture. Every visit before, the bank account link was mentioned and I was having a terrible time getting it done (don't ask why). But now, that requirement appears to have gone the way Macri (i.e. disappeared from view).

I have learned a lot about this process in the last year. I believe the structure you outline would pass. In my experience down there, the important thing is to have your heart in the right place, i.e. be sincerely trying to comply with their rules. I also let them know that Argentina is a great country and I am a guest and I am thankful for the opportunity to remain here. That has gone over well.

There are many highly informed people on this website. I don't have their breadth of knowledge. But I do have some current info on the Residencia Rentista. If I can help, let me know.
Hi, thanks for your information, i want to apply for rentista by means of trust account. Having a link between my bank account in my country and an Argentinian bank means i need to have an Argentinian bank account, but how am i supposed to have it if only people with DNI can open such an account? because DNI can be derived only after getting temporary residency, if i am not mistaken.
My whole concern is whether it would be enough the agreement with a bank in my country to send me back 30000ARS$/month for 1 year, or there are supposed to be other documents too providing that the mentioned income is from abroad of Argentina, also that the mentioned money will be definitely sent to Argentina, etc...?
How should i prove that money will be sent to Argentina ?
 
Top