Resume/CV in English or Spanish?

MatiArg

Registered
Hey peeps, i have a question,

For those who work for American/European/English speaking companies in Buenos aires, did you apply by sending your resume written in english, spanish or both? Should i have my resume translated to spanish just in case? what would you suggest i do? any info is appreciated!
 

syngirl

Registered
Are you responding to a specific ad or are you sending out cvs unsolicited? If you're responding to an ad that's in english and there is a specific contact to send to then perhaps an english CV is acceptable. However, seeing as we are in a Spanish speaking country and odds are your Human Resources contact is going to be a local you must always have a spanish version of your CV. Especially in the case that you are doing a CV blast and don't have a particular contact to send to.
 

Bairesgirl

Registered
I agree with Syngirl--I would add unless they ask for a CV in english always send it in spanish.... and adapt your US cv to Argentine Cvs.
In Argentina unlike in many other countries you are expecteto put personal information on the CV like civil status, add photographs, age or birth date and such..... and you will be asked personal questions in the interview.... It is the way it is....

Additionally would like to add that many companies don´t hire directly but through Consultoras or Employment Consultants, and they deal with many types of vacancies througout a month...
today they are looking for production engineers, workers, secretaries tomorrow promotoras, or whatever... sometimes they do all the hiring for one company so they search for all kinds of positions..... so they really may not be an expert in the area you are applying to...

These consultants may not speak good english.... and may not understand your qualifications or experience
many times language levels are assessed in the second or third interviews at the company itself.

I´ve had to explain what an MSc was to consultoras....
But they are often in the first line of the recruitment process so you must make a good impression on them....for your cv to be forwarded to their client for further consideration.
At least that has been my and my friend´s experiences....

Lately more companies hire directly but there is still a wide tendency to use consultoras.....
 

John.St

Registered
MatiArg said:
Hey peeps, i have a question,

For those who work for American/European/English speaking companies in Buenos aires, did you apply by sending your resume written in english, spanish or both? Should i have my resume translated to spanish just in case? what would you suggest i do? any info is appreciated!
The below may give you an idea about what to include of personal information in your CV:

http://lomasdezamora.olx.com.ar/administracion-de-empresas-iid-1606076
http://lomasdezamora.olx.com.ar/tecnico-quimico-iid-1606039
http://lomasdezamora.olx.com.ar/garbarino-curriculum-iid-37783739
http://lanus.olx.com.ar/secretaria-empleada-recepcionista-secretaria-direccion-iid-9264465
http://buenosaires.olx.com.ar/busco-trabajo-administrativo-o-secretaria-iid-1277756

and don't forget to add a photo of yourself in bikini, if you have one :D:D
http://tandil.olx.com.ar/promotora-tandil-iid-11416760
 

syngirl

Registered
Bairesgirl said:
In Argentina unlike in many other countries you are expecteto put personal information on the CV like civil status, add photographs, age or birth date and such..... and you will be asked personal questions in the interview.... It is the way it is....
Yes, it's bizarre for many foreigners, but here they are allowed to say "We're looking for a female secretary 22-27 years old, thin, good personality [ie big lolas], single, no children."

In interviews they can ask ALL sorts of questions about your private life. Now, technically, they are not allowed to discriminate on the basis of any of these, but in getting all of that information if something comes up that they don't like, they'll find some "fault" in your qualifications as to why you are not appropriate for the job. Disgusting but true.

If you're applying to an American or European owned company you might avoid some of these issues as the Argentine offices usually have to comply to the head office's code of conduct. They will still ask you about your personal life, but if you're lucky they'll use the details more to assess what kind of salary they will offer (ie if you're 23 and have a wife and 2 kids they know that they probably can't get away with paying you the same as the 23 yr old that has no kids and lives at home with his parents).
 

RWS

Registered
syngirl said:
. . . . technically, they are not allowed to discriminate on the basis of any of these, but . . . if something comes up that they don't like, they'll find some "fault" in your qualifications as to why you are not appropriate for the job. Disgusting but true. . . .
In this, Argentina's no different than any other state, worldwide. The laws may change from place to place, but human nature in the aggregate remains constant.
 

John.St

Registered
syngirl said:
.. they'll find some "fault" in your qualifications as to why you are not appropriate for the job. Disgusting but true.
Sure, when you look at a CEO's secretary in the US, do you find a fat spinster with mousy hair and rimmed glasses or a fake blonde with large tetas?



Human nature is human nature is human nature.
 

nleonce

Registered
John.St said:
Sure, when you look at a CEO's secretary in the US, do you find a fat spinster with mousy hair and rimmed glasses or a fake blonde with large tetas?



Yes, in the US you DO find CEO secretaries who are not blond bimbos. A lot of them are usually well educated, middle-aged women, who dress appropriately to work. I know that you were just joking, but I wanted to make sure that the truth is known.
 

dageeza

Registered
There are some things to be aware of with the "consultadoras". Although they do not charge you directly, the company they are representing will expect to get their investment back from the consultadora - i.e. indirectly, your salary they offer will reflect this. The advice I was given was to accept a lowish starting salary, then after six months in which you have shown your worth, approach directly the company and advise them what you expect from them in terms of salary/benefits etc.

Also, be aware that many companies will have a psychologist interview you directly or at least be present to assess you - this can be unnerving if you are not expecting this.
 

John.St

Registered
nleonce said:
Yes, in the US you DO find CEO secretaries who are not blond bimbos. A lot of them are usually well educated, middle-aged women, who dress appropriately to work. I know that you were just joking, but I wanted to make sure that the truth is known.
Run for dear life, boyo, 'cause you have just hinted that blondes are stupid :D

For your sake I hope Katti isn't blond or you don't meet her, 'cause her attitude to hitting someone (i.e. me) on the head with a frying pan was "frying pan. hmm. interesting!". :D

As for joking: I remembered that fake photo and simply couldn't resist :D
 
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