Safety/ Crime Problem?

bryanf

Registered
I am currently a 24-year-old New Yorker considering studying Spanish at the University of Buenos Aires for a six month period beginning in 2010. In preparation, I’ve been keeping up on news coming out of Argentina. I have been reading some disturbing stories pointing to a crime problem in Buenos Aires--burglaries, robberies and the recent protest over crime in the capital. All this makes me question whether I should be looking at other countries, namely Spain, to study Spanish.



My question to everyone currently living in Buenos Aires is this: Is crime something you worry about on a day to day basis? Or are news reports exaggerating the reality on the ground?



Thanks in advance for your input.



All the best,



Bryan
 

HDM

Registered
Having spent a lot of time in New York City, I would say that how one deals with crime is more or less the same between NYC and BAires. If you know how to get around in NYC, it won't be much different here.

Which is not to say it is an unusually safe city, only to say that it is a typical large city.

What you might want to consider if you are coming mainly to study Spanish, that the version of Spanish spoken by people in Buenos Aires has some distinct contrasts with the Spanish spoken in the rest of Latin America, and certainly distinct from the Castilian. Some of what you would learn in Buenos Aires may need to be unlearned if you travel in other Spanish speaking countries.
 

KateinBA

Registered
I lived in Sevilla, Spain for a semester a few years ago and knew more people who were robbed/pick-pocketed there than I currently do here in BsAs. The drive-by "moto robbing" was extremely popular there.

Overall, like many have pointed out before, it's a big city, and like any big city in the world, there is crime. I feel very comfortable here, while being aware that I need to keep an eye on my stuff.

I love it here and have yet to meet anyone in your/our situation or age group who doesn't ....suerte
 

Davidglen77

Registered
If you use the same common sense that you would use to keep safe in New York City here in Buenos Aires you will be fine. I am originally from New York City and grew up there in the 1970s and 1980s when it was really bad. It's much safer and nicer in NYC now compared to back then.
 

Samb4

Registered
Hey, like any international city (including NYC), there are certain measures that you must take in ensuring that you will have the safest, most enjoyable trip possible.

Protect your personal belongings at any popular tourist destinations, where pickpockets often take advantage of distracting landmarks to relieve travelers of their wallets, passports and cameras. This also holds true in crowded subways and busses. Only hold you camera in your hands when you are using it; stash it back in your bag or pocket in between photos as to not attract attention. Be careful with purses and backpacks while sitting at cafes or restaurants. These are prime spots for quick robberies, and try to tie your bags to the tables or chairs whenever possible.

At night, limit the amount of cash you carry and always know exactly where you are going. Know which areas to avoid after sundown and try sticking with a larger group instead of walking the streets alone. Only use cabs labeled as “Radio Taxis,” as these are known to be safer than independent drivers. If there are ever any problems, contact the Tourist Police Station at 4346-5748. BA is an awesome place, so if keep your head up and use common sense, you should be in for the best time of your life!
 

mendozanow

Registered
Argentina, and BA to a large extent although I have never lived there, is one of the safest countries in the world outside the wealthier Arab cvountries (having lived in Dubai and Oman, I was spoiled) or Japan,China or Korea, or Northern Europe. Certainly, it is safer here than in most large US cities. It is certainly much safer than the majority of latin american countries, except maybe for Uruguay and Chile outside of Santiago. The big problem is that when you are a victim of crime, the police are either involved or they do not give a sh·t.

The concern about security hearkens back to a safer more genteel age, and it is good that it is an issue. When security ceases to be an issue with the people, you know things have become really bad, as in Lima, Bogotà or Tegucigulpa. CRONICA TV hysterics aside, we (those of us living in Argentina) are still in one of the top 25 % of countries of the world in terms of safety.
 

AndrewBueNY

Registered
HDM said:
Having spent a lot of time in New York City, I would say that how one deals with crime is more or less the same between NYC and BAires. If you know how to get around in NYC, it won't be much different here.

Which is not to say it is an unusually safe city, only to say that it is a typical large city.

What you might want to consider if you are coming mainly to study Spanish, that the version of Spanish spoken by people in Buenos Aires has some distinct contrasts with the Spanish spoken in the rest of Latin America, and certainly distinct from the Castilian. Some of what you would learn in Buenos Aires may need to be unlearned if you travel in other Spanish speaking countries.
This person is not from that part of new york or they would have never asked the question.
 
T

Toni

Guest
Any place in the world:
If you are at the wrong place at the wrong time something will happen to you.
Move here and try your luck.
 

perry

Registered
mendozanow said:
Argentina, and BA to a large extent although I have never lived there, is one of the safest countries in the world outside the wealthier Arab cvountries (having lived in Dubai and Oman, I was spoiled) or Japan,China or Korea, or Northern Europe. Certainly, it is safer here than in most large US cities. It is certainly much safer than the majority of latin american countries, except maybe for Uruguay and Chile outside of Santiago. The big problem is that when you are a victim of crime, the police are either involved or they do not give a sh·t.

The concern about security hearkens back to a safer more genteel age, and it is good that it is an issue. When security ceases to be an issue with the people, you know things have become really bad, as in Lima, Bogotà or Tegucigulpa. CRONICA TV hysterics aside, we (those of us living in Argentina) are still in one of the top 25 % of countries of the world in terms of safety.

Yes Porteños like to glorify that they were safer in the good old days of the 70s and 80s but wait wasnt there a dictatorship back then that kidnapped thousands of people never to be heard of again.

I suggest that you see the film called the Official Story for an account of those days
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7LF5II0wIY
 
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