Temporary Residency application using the Radex website

artisans

Just Joined
Ahh ok got it. In terms of translation, what kind of certification/accreditation does the translator need to have?
You can ask one. This translator and escribano is highly recommended: Circulo de Traductores Asociados Avenida Corrientes 1832 9 "D" hours 9 to 17. Tel 4373-1503 hectoridiomas@yahoo.com.ar Recommend, when you've got your documents, go to the address, push the button 9D and be allowed to enter. If you're lucky you'll be attended by Letizia - speaks English and Spanish
 

Fiscal

Registered
Has anyone actually received an apostille from the Argentinian embassy? Because I have called at least five different apostille services in DC and they told me that because Argentina is part of the Hague Convention, they don't do apostilles and so it can only be done via the State Department.
 

artisans

Just Joined
Has anyone actually received an apostille from the Argentinian embassy? Because I have called at least five different apostille services in DC and they told me that because Argentina is part of the Hague Convention, they don't do apostilles and so it can only be done via the State Department.
Ahh, yes, this is the wrinkle - Argentina embassies in countries that are not part of the Hague Convention issue the Apostille of the country's criminal report. The US is a signer to the Hague Convention. If I were you, seeking guidance on your apostilled document from the US I would first call the Argentina embassy in the US for guidance. They can tell you the rules. You might find an answer on their website. In any case you will need to have the document translated here and the translation legalized here. After it's translated you could try uploading the US apostilled doc plus the translation to Radex. If they don't accept it or it needs more they will contact you by e-mail with the necessary change.
 

ben

Active Member
Has anyone actually received an apostille from the Argentinian embassy? Because I have called at least five different apostille services in DC and they told me that because Argentina is part of the Hague Convention, they don't do apostilles and so it can only be done via the State Department.

I didn’t need to work with any US documents, but I'm pretty sure that you asked them for the wrong service and that's why they're not being responsive.

The entire point of the Hague convention is to abolish legalization requirements. In fact, it’s literally in the name - the full name of the convention is the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement of Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents.

If both Argentina and the US are signatories - and they are - that means you do not need any Argentine consulate to legalize anything. The US legalization - when done in the manner duly prescribed by the convention - suffices to be accepted in Argentina.

The FBI report has to be apostilled by the State Department. Full stop. Nothing else is required (except the translation, which has its own rules and really really should be done here).

Any apostille service in DC is there simply to expedite the process - to wit, to submit the documents on your behalf to the State Department to be apostilled, and then to forward those documents to you. If you ask them to take your stuff to the Argentine consulate, of course they won't do that - that makes no sense.

A slightly longer explainer earlier in the thread.
 
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ben

Active Member
Ahh ok got it. In terms of translation, what kind of certification/accreditation does the translator need to have?
The translation must be done by a translator who is a member in good standing of the Colegio de Traductores Públicos de Buenos Aires. After getting the translation done and stamped by the translator, it must be legalized by that same body. That costs extra, because of course it does.

Normally the translator will, for a fee, go to the Colegio and get the document legalized for you so you don’t need to run around town.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Has anyone actually received an apostille from the Argentinian embassy? Because I have called at least five different apostille services in DC and they told me that because Argentina is part of the Hague Convention, they don't do apostilles and so it can only be done via the State Department.
I have often wondered (every time I read (in the Argentine migraciones website) that foreign documents must receive the Apostille at an Argentine embassy) how much time people who are from countries which are parties to the Hague Convention have wasted trying to do so.

Here is a link with information about requesting the Apostille (aka authentication) for an FBI criminal background report:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal/travel-legal-considerations/internl-judicial-asst/authentications-and-apostilles/requesting-authentication-services.html
 

steveinbsas

Registered
The translation must be done by a translator who is a member in good standing of the Colegio de Traductores Públicos de Buenos Aires. After getting the translation done and stamped by the translator, it must be legalized by that same body. That costs extra, because of course it does.

Normally the translator will, for a fee, go to the Colegio and get the document legalized for you so you don’t need to run around town.
When I was living in Capital federal the "best" translator was the one who lived closest to me.

I lived in three locations and found all three translators using this search engine:


I made a list of those closest and started calling their published phone numbers, knowing I would be able to speak with them in English.

PS: In all three case I hired the first one who answered in person and I also had all three get the translations legalized.
 

ben

Active Member
The translation must be done by a translator who is a member in good standing of the Colegio de Traductores Públicos de Buenos Aires. After getting the translation done and stamped by the translator, it must be legalized by that same body. That costs extra, because of course it does.

Normally the translator will, for a fee, go to the Colegio and get the document legalized for you so you don’t need to run around town.
So with all the talk about legalization, I’m afraid I should have remembered that you can never be too specific.

When speaking of legalization by the Colegio de Traductores Públicos de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, this refers of course to the legalization of the translation.

The original document must of course be legalized by the Argentine consulate with jurisdiction where the document was issued, or be Apostilled by the issuing country (if that country is a signatory to the Apostille convention, as the US is).
 

steveinbsas

Registered
The translation must be done by a translator who is a member in good standing of the Colegio de Traductores Públicos de Buenos Aires. After getting the translation done and stamped by the translator, it must be legalized by that same body. That costs extra, because of course it does.

Normally the translator will, for a fee, go to the Colegio and get the document legalized for you so you don’t need to run around town.
And, anticipating the next logical question, you can be sure that the translator is a "member in good standing of the Colegio de Traductores Públicos de Buenos Aires" based on the their ability to get the translation legalized.
 
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