The story of the Expat who died at the summit of Aconcagua

marie

Registered
Hi to Everybody:
Those who do not know the story, Michael was an expat , who has been living in Buenos Aires for two years, he goes to Mendoza Province to climb Aconcagua Mount and he is found dead at the summit of Aconcagua. I am his ex GF here in Buenos Aires. I would like to share this investigation with you, for you to draw your own conclusions, click on the link:

http://alpinismonline.com.ar/alp-notas.asp?id=10219&lang=EN

Thanks to all of you


Marie
 

mendozanow

Registered
Very sad, Marie, condolences to you, Michael's family and all his friends.

I have been keeping my eye on the shennanigans at the Park, know many of the guides, though I have only hiked to some of the lower camps myself. The stories I hear about the rescue arrangements make my blood run cold. The death of the local guide who was guiding the Italians last year, as shown on the cell phone footage, is just one of dozens of examples of the idiocy there. Aconcagua is just a cash cow for the Mendoza provincial governement.

However, high-altitude mountain climbing is a very high-risk sport, made even higher risk in the third world like Argentina. If you are not prepared to face death and the consequenes to those who know you, do not do it.

Peace.
 

nikad

Registered
I am very sorry to read this :( Unfortunately every season people die while trying to climb the Aconcagua, in general foreign tourists. May he rest in peace.
 

citygirl

Registered
First, let me say I am terribly sorry for his death and send my condolences to his friends and family. It was a terrible thing.:(

However, I hesitate to post this but am I correct in remembering that when he posted about climbing, it became apparent that he was not the most experienced climber and several people admonished him for attempting to do some very risky things? And that perhaps he was not as prepared as he ought to have been? http://baexpats.org/expat-events/2600-climbing-aconcuagua.html

I know nothing about mountain-climbing but it seems even when one is an expert and 120% prepared, tragedy can strike at any moment. And that rescue is limited even in those settings where the rescue teams are equipped with state-of-the-art training and supplies (which appears is not the case here). In fact, that thread even references how poorly equipped and trained the rescue teams are.

I hope that people (especially foreign tourists) who may not be prepared to climb, read his story and realize how dangerous it truly is and the tragic consequences that can result from it. Again, condolences on the loss.
 

marie

Registered
citygirl said:
First, let me say I am terribly sorry for his death and send my condolences to his friends and family. It was a terrible thing.:(

However, I hesitate to post this but am I correct in remembering that when he posted about climbing, it became apparent that he was not the most experienced climber and several people admonished him for attempting to do some very risky things? And that perhaps he was not as prepared as he ought to have been? http://baexpats.org/expat-events/2600-climbing-aconcuagua.html

I know nothing about mountain-climbing but it seems even when one is an expert and 120% prepared, tragedy can strike at any moment. And that rescue is limited even in those settings where the rescue teams are equipped with state-of-the-art training and supplies (which appears is not the case here). In fact, that thread even references how poorly equipped and trained the rescue teams are.

I hope that people (especially foreign tourists) who may not be prepared to climb, read his story and realize how dangerous it truly is and the tragic consequences that can result from it. Again, condolences on the loss.
well yes I know he posted many things, he did not have experience in summits as you say, though he did had experience in climbing and mountain, may be did not know too much about this mountain in particular. As for the rescuers , I am not acussing them, just asking why if they were looking for him and the Estonian told them about Mike and the weather was good , they had time how is it they never got to him?
It is ok, Mike and me went to mountains as both like hiking, it was his first summit , he had some responsibilities in this case, but what about the testimonies ? the lies in the national newspapers? I was living with mike, one thing is what you post on a forum and another thing may be what you talk to the person who is with you.
It is like your first job, you will never have a previous experience even though you are not prepared not to be saved. I work with humans , I like my job, I have lot of responsibilities with humans and that is why I go on working with humans , if I did not feel comfortable about my job or not prepared I would look for another job.
 

marie

Registered
marie said:
well yes I know he posted many things, he did not have experience in summits as you say, though he did had experience in climbing and mountain, may be did not know too much about this mountain in particular. As for the rescuers , I am not acussing them, just asking why if they were looking for him and the Estonian told them about Mike and the weather was good , they had time how is it they never got to him?
It is ok, Mike and me went to mountains as both like hiking, it was his first summit , he had some responsibilities in this case, but what about the testimonies ? the lies in the national newspapers? I was living with mike, one thing is what you post on a forum and another thing may be what you talk to the person who is with you.
It is like your first job, you will never have a previous experience even though you are not prepared not to be saved. I work with humans , I like my job, I have lot of responsibilities with humans and that is why I go on working with humans , if I did not feel comfortable about my job or not prepared I would look for another job.
well if you check which route he took (the normal route) and the route he wrote there in that post , you will see what he did is different from what he posted :)
 
Mountain climbing is a spiritual enterprise for men with excellence in the blood! The mediocre stay in the plains and flatlands.

He died a glorious death, much better than most people's, it is nothing to feel sorry about.
 

esllou

Registered
wow, some unbelievable things said in that thread from last year. Some ominious predictions too.

Travel light with speed and pray for favorable weather is the key.
I would think preparation and experience are really the key, but hey that's just me.

Truly sorry for your loss marie. It must be terrible for you.
 

marie

Registered
pandulf.ironhead said:
Mountain climbing is a spiritual enterprise for men with excellence in the blood! The mediocre stay in the plains and flatlands.

He died a glorious death, much better than most people's, it is nothing to feel sorry about.
I also think he died happy as you say, he has been with this dream of getting to the summit of Aconcagua for a long time. I love mountains too and think people who do not go to mountains , they do not know the wonderful different world it is.
 

marie

Registered
esllou said:
wow, some unbelievable things said in that thread from last year. Some ominious predictions too.

I would think preparation and experience are really the key, but hey that's just me.

Truly sorry for your loss marie. It must be terrible for you.
well perhaps he lacked preparation as he has been training in Mendoza for 4 months, he even climbed Tolosa there previously. Tolosa is 1640 feet while Aconcagua is 1900 and something else feet. Why did not he die in Tolosa?
He was perfectly acclimatized and got to the summit, that has nothing to do with preparation in my opinion. The point here is another different one. Those climbers who saw his body, they confirm he was waiting ...
There were many lies Mendoza local press published.
 
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