When I re-enter Argentina with my new iPhone, will the aduana charge me

I am actually serious. You should see the new segway electric gokarts. There is a circuito in the Pueblo where my kids live so it would be a ton of fun to have a gokart there.
Fiscal, I knew you were serious. These things do exist and it is within the scope of bringing one to the country. (You are right, THEY ARE AWESOME! I'd love to be 5, 6 or 7 years old again with a serious toy like this!!!)
 
Thank you this is really helpful. I am fine paying el arancel on the gokart but I also carry multiple iphones, computers and tablets. It would be a small fortune to pay tariffs on all them if the Aduana told me to empty my pockets.
Fiscal, Some advice to consider:

If you can afford it, pay it! It's far easier to take one trip, then return with your goodies, paying the import tariff if ordered to do so. I think that is far easier than making multiple trips. I think the cost would come close to the same overall. (What's your time worth?) (Then your effort?)

I think with the reduction of people making their way into the country that aduanas its more focused on each traveler. ie you get more scrutiny because there is more time to dedicate to less people. So, the likelihood of getting "DINGED" is greater.

No one likes to pay taxes, but it wouldn't stop me from living my life, doing what I need to or want to do.

Think about it.
 

Girino

Registered
Thank you this is really helpful. I am fine paying el arancel on the gokart but I also carry multiple iphones, computers and tablets. It would be a small fortune to pay tariffs on all them if the Aduana told me to empty my pockets.
Gokart or not, if you have multiple phones and computers on you, you are already at risk. You are supposed to bring in ONE phone and ONE notebook OR tablet for personal use. You can argue you need two for both personal and professional use, but this is a country where people make a living picking up cardboard along the streets and they don't have the mental abilities to even conceive life outside of that. If you say you need three computers for your work, when they have a State-subsidized laptop for their kids at most, they won't understand/believe. You chose to live in a underdeveloping country, where they have decided to push society and progress backward, you have to live with the consequences.

I have considered bringing in the iMac and be ready to pay the fine (in my case, about U$D900)... in pesos. However, I suspect that AFIP wants USD cash at the airport. Ah-ah. Very funny. When it suits them, the pesos is the national currency, but when they're talking real money, they suddenly lose any reserve toward the United States...

For U$D2900 cash, I can get a damn good second hand iMac in Argentina. And I don't need that much power in a machine, anyway.
So, Argentina wins this time: no technological progress, no sale, no import duty. Everybody stays the same... in the Middle Age.
 
Gokart or not, if you have multiple phones and computers on you, you are already at risk. You are supposed to bring in ONE phone and ONE notebook OR tablet for personal use. You can argue you need two for both personal and professional use, but this is a country where people make a living picking up cardboard along the streets and they don't have the mental abilities to even conceive life outside of that. If you say you need three computers for your work, when they have a State-subsidized laptop for their kids at most, they won't understand/believe. You chose to live in a underdeveloping country, where they have decided to push society and progress backward, you have to live with the consequences.

I have considered bringing in the iMac and be ready to pay the fine (in my case, about U$D900)... in pesos. However, I suspect that AFIP wants USD cash at the airport. Ah-ah. Very funny. When it suits them, the pesos is the national currency, but when they're talking real money, they suddenly lose any reserve toward the United States...

For U$D2900 cash, I can get a damn good second hand iMac in Argentina. And I don't need that much power in a machine, anyway.
So, Argentina wins this time: no technological progress, no sale, no import duty. Everybody stays the same... in the Middle Age.
Good point you make.

Please consider this:

I have, many times entered the country (I know, during better, past times!) with two computers and two cell phones for my own use. I was questioned about it and I could easily demonstrate I was carrying one each for business and personal use. (The data sets / usage / etc... were completely different. - One group looked personal in nature and the other purely business in nature.) Having said that, during these times where Argentina needs as much help (That is CODE for MONEY!) and there is very little foot traffic in the international arrival area, ADUANAS is hyper-focused on what is entering the country. They have an abundance of man power and resources to allocate to inspections / collecting duties.

The likelihood is if a person is entering with an amount of something that exceeds that guidelines, they are going to get "DINGED!" (I love this expression. It came from a post within the past month from someone else here, so I can't take credit for it, but I have embraced it.)

Fiscal, from all I have seen and read of your posts, you seem to have the means to "absorb and digest" these extra costs. I know that no one wants to pay more than they have to in life. (It is called greed I think???) But if you can afford the toll, just take your best shot at entering the country with what you want or need to take with you and get on with life.

Remember, if you can afford to pay, you are one of the lucky ones in this life. You can't take your money with you when you die, so enjoy it when you are here!

JMTC!!
 

steveinbsas

Registered
...However, I suspect that AFIP wants USD cash at the airport. Ah-ah. Very funny. When it suits them, the pesos is the national currency, but when they're talking real money, they suddenly lose any reserve toward the United States...
As far as I know, the Aduana/AFIP (as well as all other government agencies in Argentina ) can only accept pesos for any taxes or fees which must be paid for anything, including items brought into the country by travelers (regardless of their nationality) and official receipts must be provided.

If any customs agent asks for, demands, or accepts USD for anything it won't constitute an official payment and no receipt will be provided.

PS: In 2006 I had to exchange dollars for pesos at the airport to pay the only official fee I was ever charged and I don't recall any posts in the past fifteen years by anyone who reported they were asked to pay any official fees (import taxes) in USD at EZE.
 
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As far as I know, the Aduana/AFIP (as well as all other government agencies in Argentina ) can only accept pesos for any taxes or fees which must be paid for anything, including items brought into the country by travelers (regardless of their nationality) and official receipts must be provided.

If any customs agent asks for, demands, or accepts USD for anything it won't constitute an official payment and no receipt will be provided.

PS: In 2006 I had to exchange dollars for pesos at the airport to pay the only official fee I was ever charged and I don't recall any posts in the past fifteen years by anyone who reported they were asked to pay any official fees (import taxes) in USD at EZE.
You raise a good point. I can't ever remember settling any debt with any Argentine governmental entity in anything but pesos.
 

Girino

Registered
I can hardly imagine myself having enough pesos on me to pay a 900 USD import duty in Ezeiza when coming back from abroad. But I guess it would work for someone else if you can pay by card and you have an Argentinian account loaded with pesos.

I don't think they let you out without paying... I imagine the payment is due on the spot and that they won't keep the goods 'on hold' while you go outside to exchange your USD on the blue market.
 

brandon

Registered
I got caught bringing in a new bicycle a few years back. I was surprised the Aduana agent quickly pulled up a page with the sales price, about equal to what I had paid. He responded to my pleas of not having pesos or local account by pulling out a remote posnet, said they accepted amex, visa, Master. Or they would "hold" the bike for days until I could pay the tax, 50% over $350 I think at that time.
I paid imaging I'd never see the bike again if I walked out.
Afterwards, locals said I should have had a special receipt created when purchased closer to the cap.
 
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