Will the Border be closed for the rest of the year?

Bajo_cero2

Registered
I don't think we have to be entirely pessimistic. American Airlines is resuming flights to Spain from DFW this week. If they can operate sucessfully it will create a lot of pressure on other airlines and countries to do the same.


American Airlines Resumes Flights To Spain
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Dallas-based US carrier American Airlines is cautiously rolling out a limited schedule of summer flights between the USA and Europe. These include the resumption of nonstop services between Dallas Fort Worth and Madrid’s Barajas Airport this week. The flights will see American Airlines become the only carrier currently offering nonstop flights between the US and Spain.
Sure, what can loose those countries in the top 5?
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
The decree that closed airports is until September.
However, the usd skyrocketed 100% in a few months. I don't think that this jobs salary is going to be the same in usd.
 

dsp27

Registered
With Avianca, the world second oldest airline, filing for bankruptcy, with the US (and many other developed countries) likely to get their opening up wrong and thereby needing to lockdown again, leading in turn to more fear, and even less flying, is there any good reason to assume there will even be an airline industry able to operate either within this region or between here and North America and Europe when borders open?
Is this you Debbie Downer? Avianca was a poorly run business —- they nearly went bankrupt last year. They will restructure and be back in business eventually. Life goes on.
 

antipodean

Registered
Yes there will be. Most of it will end up state owned. There will be less airlines left in the sky with less capacity meaning much higher fares, meaning even less traffic. At least for 3-5 years.

Lufthansa is trying to get a €10bn government bailout, similar to Air France and British Airways.

Avianca is negotiating a huge bailout from the Colombian government, so will probably still fly (they are doing chapter 11, like all the major US carriers have done in the past)

You will still get to MIA using Aerolineas and paying $2000 to receive a ham and cheese sandwich, a banana and a piece of bread wrapped in a plastic bag on a flimsy blue tray. Welcome to the golden age of tax payer funded flying.
 

jeff1234

Registered
Yes there will be. Most of it will end up state owned. There will be less airlines left in the sky with less capacity meaning much higher fares, meaning even less traffic. At least for 3-5 years.

Lufthansa is trying to get a €10bn government bailout, similar to Air France and British Airways.

Avianca is negotiating a huge bailout from the Colombian government, so will probably still fly (they are doing chapter 11, like all the major US carriers have done in the past)

You will still get to MIA using Aerolineas and paying $2000 to receive a ham and cheese sandwich, a banana and a piece of bread wrapped in a plastic bag on a flimsy blue tray. Welcome to the golden age of tax payer funded flying.
Qatar just cut 25% of its fleet. The CEO said not to expect a return to 2019 levels of flights until 2024. All airlines, government owned or not, will be reworking their business model and trying to figure out how to survive with less passengers, less flights, more sanitary expenses, and a big hole in their bank accounts where their 2020 income was supposed to be. Inevitably fares will go up.
Maybe one piece of good news is that they can't squeeze passengers any closer together unless they have us sit on each others laps. And maybe with higher fares there will be less annoying passengers on the flights.
I think it is inevitable that the virus will pop up at destinations around the world further complicating planning and recovery.
Two days ago United was promising to keep the middle seat open. Yesterday they returned to filling every seat.
The same planning will occur on the ground, tour companies, hotels, taxi companies, restaurant will be dealing with these issues.

And possibly the worst plague is still to come...the lawyers will be suing everyone everywhere for everything.
 

dsp27

Registered
Qatar just cut 25% of its fleet. The CEO said not to expect a return to 2019 levels of flights until 2024. All airlines, government owned or not, will be reworking their business model and trying to figure out how to survive with less passengers, less flights, more sanitary expenses, and a big hole in their bank accounts where their 2020 income was supposed to be. Inevitably fares will go up.
Maybe one piece of good news is that they can't squeeze passengers any closer together unless they have us sit on each others laps. And maybe with higher fares there will be less annoying passengers on the flights.
I think it is inevitable that the virus will pop up at destinations around the world further complicating planning and recovery.
Two days ago United was promising to keep the middle seat open. Yesterday they returned to filling every seat.
The same planning will occur on the ground, tour companies, hotels, taxi companies, restaurant will be dealing with these issues.

And possibly the worst plague is still to come...the lawyers will be suing everyone everywhere for everything.

36 Days Without Steve
The major issue is not the return of the regular folk to the skies but the likely drop in business travel (where airlines generate most of their revenue). First, business will be down for some time BUT more crucially, many business will realize they can function perfectly well via video-conferencing and don't need to travel as much.
 

sergio

Registered
My best guess is that you would be able to travel. HOWEVER, if I were you I'd cancel and come another time. You will not have "the full experience" because life won't get close to normal this year. If you can reschedule and come another time do so.
Hard to say but if so, would a two week hotel quarantine be required?
 

on the brink

Registered
Hopefully, a "regional bubble" travel window will open. For instance, for travel between Argentina and Uruguay, Chile. etc.

That is, to and from countries with similar infection rates and virus control measures. I've read that New Zealand and Australia are considering such a bubble.
 

lunar

Registered
That is, to and from countries with similar infection rates and virus control measures.
China, when they had high infection rates, prohibited flights from Iran. They were afraid to introduce a different coronavirus strain. Iran had lower infection rate at that time.
 
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