Will the election increase expatrism?

Stanexpat

Registered
"soulskier" said:
CityGirl, It will be a long time before BA reaches prices of Paris, New York, and London!
Actually, if you believe the Mercer data, add two years of 30% inflation in Buenos Aires, you arrive at New York city prices. I doubt this will happen as something is going to have to give there. If the cost of living there continues to increase at it current rate there will be blood in the streets. Just imagine trying to live in NYC on what the average Argentine makes.
All this tells me whats going on in Argentina economically today is unstainable. The government is going to really have to roll-back spending significantly or suffer the consequences of staying the road they are on. Someone described current government policy as staying the course directly down the drain.
 

soulskier

Registered
Stan, I am hapy to report that I agree with you on this. One idea might be to actually make people in Argentina pay taxes. Our accountant here has pretty much confirmed that Argie's pay very little taxes. Some have said not paying taxes is one of the Argentine pastime's, along with mate, futbol, and waiting in line.
 

Fishface

Registered
"soulskier" said:
CityGirl, It will be a long time before BA reaches prices of Paris, New York, and London!
said on the 19th
today 21st
prices are now *more* than London or New York.
41 pesos for a cheese and tomato pizza?? 15 dollars - 8 pounds - for cheese and a bread.
people are hiking prices for fun now.
even cleaners now get the equivalent of minimum wage in the US (gross that is) doubt the cleaners do a tax return or make medical contributions
 

kenmtraveller

Registered
Where are you paying 41 pesos for a cheese and tomato pizza? I'm still paying 25-30 pesos, depending on toppings...and that's at Filo, which is way more upscale than most pizza places.I agree with you on your main point, which is that inflation here is very high.
Ken
 

Fishface

Registered
Romario's - they're dotted around Barrio Norte. more expensive than Pizza Express in the West end of London
My point is that inflation now is people/businesses taking a punt - i.e try anything without real test for the market - few are more cautious, inching prices up.
Volta were asking 11.90 for cafe con leche - 4 dollars - more expensive than Starbucks on 43rd and Broadway.
as we all know, its gonna end in tears - maybe sooner rather than later judging by the anticipation of businesses.
Boom and bust - old fashioned economics.
...oh! look an iceberg! where?! ..............

At least the American tax payer has the decency to bail out their economy.
 

criswkh

Registered
Will the bailout help in the long term? As far as cost of living vs. major cities. We live north of General Paz and prices seem cheaper, but in three months I have seen the bus raise from .75 to .90 and the train go from .65 to .85. Our dog food has increased by $50 pesos. As long as we are earning some dollars and the rate stays 3:1 I think the cost is still far cheaper than Chicago. Our stress level has gone down even though I drive an hour to work one way. Will people flee the US, maybe? But living in a foreign country isn't as easy as some people think, expecially for the first year.
 

citygirl

Registered
Fettucini - actually, you're wrong - I love living here. As I've posted repeatedly - I have chosen to make Argentina my home & am luckily in a position to have a career where I can earn in dollars which provides me a level of comfort that many don't have. And my quality of life has improved immeasurably from my life in NYC. I'm very lucky in that I don't really have to worry about costs right now.
However, customer service here is a bit of a lost art. Everything does take longer here. Your odds of having a strike are expontentially higher here. Just facts. Navigating the bureacracy from a business stand point is hard - and I am involved in business dealings in China, India, Eastern Europe - etc. Argentina (and many South American countries) are some of the hardest places to do business in - especially if you want to do it legally.
Again - my point simply is that for many people - a lower cost of living was the plus you achieved & the write off was lower service levels. If however the prices keep going and the services stay the same - I don't know how appealing Buenos Aires would be to a lot of people
Additionally, I don't think there is anything unrealistic about questioning what will happen with Argentina especially if the inflation continues. Prices are out of whack and if those of us that are earning in dollars are feeling the pinch, how do you expect those earning in pesos are feeling?
 

kenmtraveller

Registered
As an expat, it's tempting to compare prices and salaries to Europe or America. But I am curious -- what about Brazil? I hear that Rio is much more expensive than Buenos Aires -- do Brazilians make much more money than Argentines? What is inflation like in Brazil right now? Anyone know?Ken
 
Top