Will the election increase expatrism?

soulskier

Registered
Interesting comments all the way around. Seems like a wide range of views. One thing is sure, this is going to be a very interesting election and about 50% of Northern Americans are not going to be happy with the outcome.
 

citygirl

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Given the decidedly "unrosy" economic picture in Argentina, I think even those who will choose to be expats may think twice about Argentina these days. 30% inflation, a pretty high cost of living (esp compared to low/mid level cities in the US) and a convoluted bueracratic process of obtaining residency aren't exactly enticements to most people.
 

Stanexpat

Registered
A good rule of thumb for South America is people are cheap and ( particularly imported generally) things are expensive.
In argentina locally produced products are cheaper but usually of lower quality. Things like applicances are very expensive. Our 5 year old Kenmore side by side frig sold for $1000 dollars. In the states you can buy it new for around $800. Some models of cars in Argentina sell for more used than new(the government sets the price on new, too low, so none are available).
Soulskier is right that wine and meat are cheaper but you can expect other costs except energy to be about the same as in the states. According to Mercer Consulting data, which I find suspect, the cost of living in B.A. is about 110% more than what it would cost in an average U.S. city.
In any event its not a bargin like it was a few years ago. However, if you are from someplace like California or Manhattan it will seem cheaper for you.
Gasoline, natural gas, and diesel are cheaper in Argentina but are subsidized by the government. According to the news today the government in Argentina is cutting significantly energy subsidies for 2009 so I don't know how much they will cost in the future.
By the way Soulskier, your comment on mid priced cities in the U.S. sounds more than slightly arrogant and insulting, maybe you can clarify.
 

soulskier

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Stan, I meant that I have not spent much time in cities, as I am a mountain person. I did not mean to offend anyone, please excuse me if I did.
 

soulskier

Registered
"Stanexpat" said:
A good rule of thumb for South America is people are cheap and ( particularly imported generally) things are expensive.
Stan, some might find your view that people from South America are cheap as insulting. ¿Como se dice "the pot calling the kettle black" en Castellaño?
 

Stanexpat

Registered
"donesteban" said:
Perhaps Stan would have been more precise to state that labor is cheap, rather than people...
Sorry, youre right I meant to say the cost of labor is cheap not the people.
Also, Soulskier sorry I misunderstood your comment.
 

citygirl

Registered
I lived in Manhattan for 9 years before moving to Arg & so things definitely seem cheap compared to there. However, I've been back in one of those "smaller cities" in the US for the last four months & it seems to me that Buenos Aires prices are higher on average than here.
Housing costs (assuming short-term "tourista apt) are definitely higher in Buenos Aires than here. Even if I were to rent a long-term apt with guarantia, the cost might be slighly less to rent in Argentina than here but the cost to furnish it would be much higher than here so in either case, still more expensive in Arg
Food costs - about the same, perhaps a little higher in Argentina.
Gas costs - probably cheaper in Arg but again, that's subsidized by gov't so that may not be true much longer if they cut subsidies.
Health Care - definitely much cheaper in Argentina.
 
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