Working at a Ski Resort?????

msnedden8405

Registered
Hi All,

I am currently living in Buenos Aires, but thought of moving elsewhere in Argentina during the winter in order to work at a ski resort....does anyone know if this is possible? And if so, where and how do I apply?? Thanks!!!

Megan
 

jez

Registered
Do you speak Spanish? Do you have the right to work in Argentina.?

I expect most resorts wait for the snow to arrive before looking for staff, then hire the people who worked there the year before, less administration that way and more time to drink mate.

3 key requirements for working at Cerro Catedral as a lift operator:
- Stand around and do nothing when there is work to do.
- When you do work, do so as slowly as possible as nobody expects the lifts to open on time.
- Don't communicate with the people waiting in the queue to let them know why the lift has stopped.
 

oxente!

Registered
I think the key question is who do you know... I worked in Pinamar during the high season for a few weeks last year and the only way to get those jobs is via connections.

I know a young couple (Argentines) that are semi-nomatic and work the winters at Las Leñas and then the summers in the Costa. In general, they are not making much money at all. The pay is very low but usually housing and 1 meal per day is provided. When I worked in Pinamar I barely broke even (when considering I had to pay rent in BA while out at Pinamar).

You must speak great Spanish unless you know the owner or something and they will find you something to do!

Suerte!
 

elhombresinnombre

Registered
soulskier said:
Don't bother. The pay is weak and you should be skiing, not working.
Do bother. The pay is so weak that the staff turnover in the industry is horrendous and if you show any sort of aptitude you'll have the opportunity to step into the shoes of at least one person senior to yourself. Next season you'll be known in the very small winter sports holidays clique and have a track record and a CV.

Do bother. If you are working in the ski holiday industry you'll have free time and opportunities within your company or amongst other employees for cheap/free passes, coaching etc when you get out onto the snow.
 

jez

Registered
elhombresinnombre said:
Do bother. If you are working in the ski holiday industry you'll have free time and opportunities within your company or amongst other employees for cheap/free passes, coaching etc when you get out onto the snow.
I'm sure you are expected to work 6 days a week, with limited opportunities to ski during your (probably 30 min) lunch hour. People work at ski resorts because they want to work there, not for the pay. I worked as a liftie in New Zealand, the pay was barly enough to live off, the competition for work high and limited opportunities to spend time skiing especially on the powder days when you spent most of your time digging out the lifts.
 

elhombresinnombre

Registered
jez said:
I'm sure you are expected to work 6 days a week, with limited opportunities to ski during your (probably 30 min) lunch hour. People work at ski resorts because they want to work there, not for the pay. I worked as a liftie in New Zealand, the pay was barly enough to live off, the competition for work high and limited opportunities to spend time skiing especially on the powder days when you spent most of your time digging out the lifts.
This is a glass-half-full/glass-half-empty kindova thing isn't it? All that I wrote above was based on my son's actual experiences in the European ski holiday industry. Yes, the pay is rubbish but it can be less rubbish if, for example, you go in as a night porter (which leaves the daytime for boarding) and get made up to head chef - to cite what happened to him one season.
 

msnedden8405

Registered
jez said:
Do you speak Spanish? Do you have the right to work in Argentina.?

I expect most resorts wait for the snow to arrive before looking for staff, then hire the people who worked there the year before, less administration that way and more time to drink mate.

3 key requirements for working at Cerro Catedral as a lift operator:
- Stand around and do nothing when there is work to do.
- When you do work, do so as slowly as possible as nobody expects the lifts to open on time.
- Don't communicate with the people waiting in the queue to let them know why the lift has stopped.

Interesting insights, but I at least sent an email to Cerro Catedral to see if they hire expats. Happen to know of other popular ski resorts??
 

msnedden8405

Registered
Hi everyone,

Just wanted to say thank you so much for your comments and feedback, I really appreciate it! I definitely don't expect to make much money, and know already how the long work hours go due to living and working in BA. It would be just for the experience, and free lodging would be ideal! Just wanted to know if anyone can recommend a few popular/nice ski resorts, and then I'll send applications and emails out, see what kind of response I get, then report it back to the network for everyone elses knowledge. Thanks!
 

jez

Registered
msnedden8405 said:
Hi everyone,

Just wanted to say thank you so much for your comments and feedback, I really appreciate it! I definitely don't expect to make much money, and know already how the long work hours go due to living and working in BA. It would be just for the experience, and free lodging would be ideal! Just wanted to know if anyone can recommend a few popular/nice ski resorts, and then I'll send applications and emails out, see what kind of response I get, then report it back to the network for everyone elses knowledge. Thanks!
Cerro Catedral certainly doesn't provide free lodging.

Go to: http://www.snow-forecast.com/ click on Argentina from the drop down box (select country) and you will see a list of names of resorts is Argentina, then Google the name
 
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