Am I the only person in Argentina that finds the term "chinito" offensive?

nikad

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Research suggests that race and racism is still a relevant and determinant factor in the United States (Advisory Board to the President's Initiative on Race, 1998; Thompson & Neville, 1999; Haney-Lopez, 2010). The election of Barack Obama as the 44th President of the United States and the first Black president led many to believe that America achieved racial equality. The term “post-racial” America was coined to validate this notion of racial parity, while simultaneously negating issues of racism as somehow irrelevant in this new era of American history. Despite this idea of being post-racial, several cultural critics and scholars point out that this racial equity has not been reached or achieved (Wise, 2010; Tesler & Sears, 2010). Further research indicates the widening gap in racial inequality in this post-racial era include the following: education research shows racial segregation has grown in the last forty years and policy makers have abandoned policies to create efforts for integration (Rothstein, 2013; Kucsera & Orfield, 2014); housing examinations determine that Black and White citizens still live in racially segregated communities (Desmond, 2012; Crowder et al, 2012); health disparities indicate the vast differences in health care determined by race (LaVeist, 2005; Dressler et. al, 2005); employment opportunities starkly contrast by racial differences favoring White potential employees over their Black counterparts (Western, 2006; Pager, 2007); voting rights have been shown to play a significant difference in changing election results and denying Black citizens through disenfranchisement laws (Harvey, 1994; Manza & Uggen, 2006; Uggen et al, 2006); incarceration has been shown to be unequally distributed across racial lines (Wacquant, 2002; Western, 2007; Alexander, 2010).
Despite the abundance of research specifying stark differences by race and creating enormous racial disparities, White Americans believe racial differences are declining (Sue et. al, 2007). In addition, many White Americans view themselves as good, moral, and believe in equality, which would refute ideas of prejudice or discrimination (Sue, 2004). Therefore, racism in a post-racial America is much more covert and implicit as opposed to earlier forms of overt and explicit forms of racial aggression. Scholarship indicates that new forms of racism have emerged via micro-aggressions that imply traditional racist ideology without having to be explicit in using race but now use other traditional American values (e.g. self-reliance) as a reason why individuals or groups are unsuccessful.
 

earlyretirement

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For sure there are a lot of ignorant Americans that are super racist. If anything, you see morons like Trump that try to almost make it seem normal. They call it "nationalism" but really it's just racism.

I think Argentines also can be really racist and not afraid to show it where as in the USA people tend to be more quiet about it for the most part.
 

TWB103

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Out of curiosity:
Would you find it offensive is a fellow Argentine called you Sudaca?
What if a Peruvian called you Sudaca?
Nikad makes it clear that the context and and intent is what matters not the word. If 2 Latin American friends want to refer to each other as 'Sudacas' whats is got to do with anyone else? In this context its obviously an effective word to show trust and playfulness between the 2. Without context and intent words have no power and people are just 'pavloving' to the word they hear or see.
 

deadOA

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The OP question was designed to connect the 2 words "Argentina" and "Racism".

The honest question should be:
On a world-nations scale of 1 to 198, how do you rank Argentina?
(1 being most racist, 198 least racist).

Zero "racism" does not exist.
Shooting Latinos is much more disgusting than "chinito", and should be the focus of this Forum, no?
 

Stantucker

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The OP question was designed to connect the 2 words "Argentina" and "Racism".

The honest question should be:
On a world-nations scale of 1 to 198, how do you rank Argentina?
(1 being most racist, 198 least racist).

Zero "racism" does not exist.
Shooting Latinos is much more disgusting than "chinito", and should be the focus of this Forum, no?
First of all, I do not have a problem with the term chinito, but I fail to see how racism in the US is pertinent to this discussion. Earlier in this thread you and others stated that people with racism in their home countries had no right to be talking about the use of these terms in Argentina. Those are two totally separate questions. Early Retirement just stated that there are lots of ignorant Americans who are racists. No one is denying that the US still has a huge problem with racism. If you want to start a thread on racism in the US, go right ahead. Some of this almost seems like an attempt to deny racism in Argentina or to say, well, we may have our political and economic problems but we're not ________ like the US or some other country. Why do we have constantly to be making comparisons that seemed designed to avoid discussing the issue at hand, regardless of what the issue is or to what country it applies?
 

semigoodlookin

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And a current poster creating a seperate account pretending to be an old Argentine who cannot use computers just to try and sell their point. Jajaja
 

lamarque

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Like in many other areas, Argentina is simply behind. That's not to say this nonsense does not still go on in other countires, btw.
Really? and that is coming from a person of a country where the representative figure (president elected democratically) is clearly a racist and call city's where black people live an infested nest of rats?, come down from your big white horse and face reality.
 

semigoodlookin

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Really? and that is coming from a person of a country where the representative figure (president elected democratically) is clearly a racist and call city's where black people live an infested nest of rats?, come down from your big white horse and face reality.
Another person coming at me with infested rats. What are these infested rats, I have no idea what the reference is? It seems to be something related to Trump and the U.S., where I am not from.

Also, for comparisons with the United States, read Stantucker's post above as it is pertinent.
 
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