AR Citizenship question

#31
How much does it cost to get citizenship?
At Court zero, you have to pays for the edicts (between 400 up to 10.000 pesos) plus the certificates from Korea and its translators). If you mean lawyers fees, it vary from 1000 up to 10.000 depending on the expertize, if he or she is a paralegal or a real lawyer and the facts of the case.
 
#32
Bajo, how can someone contact you?
I want to apply for citizenship but I can't spend all the time of the process there. I am having an Argentine child in about 1 month.
 
#33
At Court zero, you have to pays for the edicts (between 400 up to 10.000 pesos) plus the certificates from Korea and its translators). If you mean lawyers fees, it vary from 1000 up to 10.000 depending on the expertize, if he or she is a paralegal or a real lawyer and the facts of the case.
Can I acquire permanent residence in Uruguay if I become naturalized in Argentina?
 
#34
Can I acquire permanent residence in Uruguay if I become naturalized in Argentina?
After you acquire Argentine citizenship you could apply for residency in Uruguay as a citizen of another Mercosur country. The website for migraciones in Uruguay should list the requirements.
 
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#37
Actually, you can get Spanish citizenship in 2 years provided you live in Spain (legally) for 2 years as an Argentine national. You should first become an Argentine citizen, and once you do apply for a non-lucrative visa in Spain (provided you have enough cash saved up so as to prove you won't work for as long as your visa is valid; once you're there you can work online, though).

After 2 years of residency in Spain, citizens of Latin American countries can apply for Spanish citizenship. You won't need to take a language test as an Argentine national, but you'll need to take a Spanish culture test. The rest of the paperwork and the process is pretty straightforward. The only problem is the wait; currently around 3 years from the moment you apply, although they are working to reduce that (last year they digitized the entire process and supposedly that will make the wait much shorter).
 

camel

Registered
#38
Actually, you can get Spanish citizenship in 2 years provided you live in Spain (legally) for 2 years as an Argentine national. You should first become an Argentine citizen, and once you do apply for a non-lucrative visa in Spain (provided you have enough cash saved up so as to prove you won't work for as long as your visa is valid; once you're there you can work online, though).
Does this apply to naturalized Argentine citizens, for example, a US citizen who came to Argentina, lived here for a few years and got citizenship here in AR? I thought I had read that the Spanish citizenship you describe was only for native-born Argentines, but please correct me if I'm wrong.

El Cordobes, do you know anything about this?
 

lamarque

Active Member
#39
Actually, you can get Spanish citizenship in 2 years provided you live in Spain (legally) for 2 years as an Argentine national. You should first become an Argentine citizen, and once you do apply for a non-lucrative visa in Spain (provided you have enough cash saved up so as to prove you won't work for as long as your visa is valid; once you're there you can work online, though).

After 2 years of residency in Spain, citizens of Latin American countries can apply for Spanish citizenship. You won't need to take a language test as an Argentine national, but you'll need to take a Spanish culture test. The rest of the paperwork and the process is pretty straightforward. The only problem is the wait; currently around 3 years from the moment you apply, although they are working to reduce that (last year they digitized the entire process and supposedly that will make the wait much shorter).
Not sure if it works for non native Argentinean, but as far as for native Argentinean i have friends that did this, and was quite easy according to them.
 
#40
^ It does not work. Naturalized non Ibero American born citizens cannot take advantage of the Spanish nationality law for the 2 year residency, and there's no way around it. One must be born in one of the countries on the list. Native born Argentines with foreign parents are eligible, even if they're 100% Asian/African/White.