Argentina vs Brasilia, Uruguay

Dougie

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Yes there were environmental concerns especially around Gualeguaychu of the pollution that the pulp mill would potential cause. I haven't heard anything about that project since. Has it caused the pollution that they had feared?

My point is that a large country like Argentina should theoretically be able to bully it's small neighbor to prevent them from facilitating a great plunder of their resources.

I guess the Argentine government doesn't consider it a priority. - https://usa.oceana.org/publications/reports/oceana-finds-hundreds-vessels-vanishing-along-argentinas-waters

In good years, Squid alone generates 2.4 billion.
 

camberiu

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I shared the map above with a student of mine in Brasilia just now, and he was surprised. He said that he had expected Brazil's poverty rates to be higher than Argentina's.

Perceptions, eh?
I think your student is an exception. The meme bellow represents well the perception of most Brazilians when they think of Argentina.

 

camberiu

Registered
I wasn't suggesting a military invasion, more of something on the economic side.
Applicable both for military and economic intimidation. Every time Argentina has tried to put economic (or military or diplomatic) pressure on Uruguay, all it accomplished was to push Uruguay closer to Brazil's orbit. Uruguay has played this bipolar push and pull masterfully over the past 100 years.
 

TWB103

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Applicable both for military and economic intimidation. Every time Argentina has tried to put economic (or military or diplomatic) pressure on Uruguay, all it accomplished was to push Uruguay closer to Brazil's orbit. Uruguay has played this bipolar push and pull masterfully over the past 100 years.
iow typical international diplomacy dynamics. Argentina does exactly the same with The Falklands and in trade etc.
 

camberiu

Registered
iow typical international diplomacy dynamics. Argentina does exactly the same with The Falklands and in trade etc.
Absolutely. There is nothing evil or insidious about how Uruguay balances itself between its two bigger neighbors. They are doing what is best for them. But that answers the question as to why "can't Argentina bully Uruguay into compliance".
 

Redpossum

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Absolutely. There is nothing evil or insidious about how Uruguay balances itself between its two bigger neighbors. They are doing what is best for them. But that answers the question as to why "can't Argentina bully Uruguay into compliance".
And answers it quite well, thank you!

The only thing I could add is that historically, the British sometimes played the role of Uruguay's guarantor. In the time of Rosas, when Argentina laid siege to Montevideo, the British kept it supplied by sea and made sure the siege went nowhere. After the battle of Vuelta de Obligado, Montevideo was a safe haven and source of supply/repair to the combined British/French fleet attacking up the river. In the aftermath of that campaign, when the British and French were forced to negotiate, lifting the siege of Montevideo was the only concession Rosas made in exchange for the Europeans granting Argentina everything he had demanded.

In the first months of WW2, the "Battle of the River Plate" (sic) was fought just offshore here. In the aftermath the Graf Spee ran for port in Argentina, but was forced into Montevideo instead. The Uruguayans played the role of the neutral scrupulously, (while quietly cooperating with the British behind the scenes), forcing her captain to leave port after only 72 hours, so he scuttled her. The Germans had expected a different and far more sympathetic reception had they been able to make Mar del Plata or Buenos Aires. I have read that the salvaged optical rangefinder from the Graf Spee is still on display in Montevideo.
 

Dougie

Registered
Absolutely. There is nothing evil or insidious about how Uruguay balances itself between its two bigger neighbors. They are doing what is best for them. But that answers the question as to why "can't Argentina bully Uruguay into compliance".
Uruguay needs to survive and do what's best for them, but they are facilitating the collapse of an ecosystem in the South Atlantic sea. Is that not evil?

Well, according to Redpossum, who seems pretty well read. I have no idea if that's true or not.

The Argentine state seems very powerless. No leverage.
 
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