BA Expat Indeed

Diego NC

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Diego what line of work are you in? Seems to me NC labor market is pretty robust. You complain about illegal immigrants and also about Trump. You may not be happy anywhere at this stage in your life.
I have investments on real estate, but when I first came to the US I had to compete with illegals for blue-collar jobs. This is the beauty of America though; you can disagree with Trump and still complain about immigration issues. The problem comes when we get involved in a false dialectic, such as the one going on in Argentina: If you are not with Fernandez, you must be with Macri, if you're not for Macri you must be against the Kirchners, and so on. I don't have to support Trump in order to have right-wing ideas. By the way, where is the wall that he promised and that Mexico was to pay for?
 
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EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

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I had to acquire significant debt to enroll in college. Income taxes, pretty much taxes on everything. Many employers hire illegal immigrants and I don't think they should share the same benefits as those of us who entered this country legally. There are issues on racism, discrimination, police brutality, the right to keep and bear arms and its correlation to shootings. The minimum wage should be raised to $15, and there are so many crazy drivers!
Hi Diego,

With respect to higher education, you are correct. Taking on DEBT is a part of the process in EE UU.

It all came about in the mid 1980's with the idea picking up a a lot of steam into the 90's and thus things are where they are today as a result of institutions figuring out that they could raise tuition costs as high as they like as long as there was a way to FINANCE it. So, students finance their educations. And unless they are involved in a cash cow type of career when they enter the work force, they spend the better part of the next 2 or 3 decades paying it all back ... or trying to at least.

And the financial aid / scholarship programs are nothing more than smoke and mirrors for the vast majority of those who receive them. It amounts to little more than a discount off of list price. The recipients get a better price, but not free in 99.99% of all examples.

As for your perception that everything is taxed???

It IS! MOSTLY!!! BUT >>> NOT REALLY!!!

I live in a state where clothing is tax free up to $170 USD per each single item, all un prepared food is not taxed, services are not taxed, and a whole host of items that are considered essential for survival ... such as energy used to cook and heat with, medical services, etc ... ARE NOT TAXED.

That is a lot of stuff that you spend a good part of your money on that is NOT TAXED!!!!!

I think a big part of your perception is that when an item is taxed, IT IS LINED ITEMED on a store receipt. And you notice it!

TRUTHFULLY, I am not familiar with the tax code for NC (N north Carolina) but it is a somewhat Republican state I believe??? I would thing the tax bite there is not so bas a state like CA or NY???

Here is one for you ... ROAD FUEL >>> ie gasoline and diesel has an EMBEDDED TAX ... Both a FEDERAL TAX and a STATE TAX. It says so on the gas pump, but the receipt never reflects it. SAME FOR tobacco products ... THE TAXES ARE EMBEDDED In the price. But, my state is so whacky that tobacco products are taxed again at the cash resister with in my opinion amounts to double taxation ... which I think is completely wrong and overboard by the taxing authority / legislative body of the state.

BUT HERE IS THE POINT >>> In Argentina, everything has an embedded tax of I believe 21%??? And it never shows up on a sales receipt! BUT - EVERYTHING IS TAXED THERE and because it is embedded, people are so used to it that they forget it is taxed.

So, is it possible that as the systems are different, you have the perception that everything is taxed?

And I'll offer this as well ... There is no (Fuel ; Tobacco aside ... I am not sure if there is anything else, but it could be heavy truck tires I think???) federal tax on most things in EE UU ...

BUT - EITHER WAY ... governments need their taxes from the tax base ... and they get their money to run one way or another. It really comes down to how transparent the process is.

I am dying for some feed back on my post from someone out there!
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

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I have investments on real estate, but when I first came to the US I had to compete with illegals for blue collar jobs. This is the beauty of America though; you can disagree with Trump and still complain about immigration issues. The problem comes when we get involved in a false dialectic, such as the one going on in Argentina: If you are not with Fernandez, you must be with Macri, if you're not for Macri you must be against the Kirchners, and so on. I don't have to support Trump in order to have right-wing ideas. By the way, where is the wall that he promised and that Mexico was supposed to pay for?
That wall got forgotten about because other stuff that stepped in front of it!
 

QuilmesSlo

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Hi Diego,

With respect to higher education, you are correct. Taking on DEBT is a part of the process in EE UU.

It all came about in the mid 1980's with the idea picking up a a lot of steam into the 90's and thus things are where they are today as a result of institutions figuring out that they could raise tuition costs as high as they like as long as there was a way to FINANCE it. So, students finance their educations. And unless they are involved in a cash cow type of career when they enter the work force, they spend the better part of the next 2 or 3 decades paying it all back ... or trying to at least.

And the financial aid / scholarship programs are nothing more than smoke and mirrors for the vast majority of those who receive them. It amounts to little more than a discount off of list price. The recipients get a better price, but not free in 99.99% of all examples.

As for your perception that everything is taxed???

It IS! MOSTLY!!! BUT >>> NOT REALLY!!!

I live in a state where clothing is tax free up to $170 USD per each single item, all un prepared food is not taxed, services are not taxed, and a whole host of items that are considered essential for survival ... such as energy used to cook and heat with, medical services, etc ... ARE NOT TAXED.

That is a lot of stuff that you spend a good part of your money on that is NOT TAXED!!!!!

I think a big part of your perception is that when an item is taxed, IT IS LINED ITEMED on a store receipt. And you notice it!

TRUTHFULLY, I am not familiar with the tax code for NC (N north Carolina) but it is a somewhat Republican state I believe??? I would thing the tax bite there is not so bas a state like CA or NY???

Here is one for you ... ROAD FUEL >>> ie gasoline and diesel has an EMBEDDED TAX ... Both a FEDERAL TAX and a STATE TAX. It says so on the gas pump, but the receipt never reflects it. SAME FOR tobacco products ... THE TAXES ARE EMBEDDED In the price. But, my state is so whacky that tobacco products are taxed again at the cash resister with in my opinion amounts to double taxation ... which I think is completely wrong and overboard by the taxing authority / legislative body of the state.

BUT HERE IS THE POINT >>> In Argentina, everything has an embedded tax of I believe 21%??? And it never shows up on a sales receipt! BUT - EVERYTHING IS TAXED THERE and because it is embedded, people are so used to it that they forget it is taxed.

So, is it possible that as the systems are different, you have the perception that everything is taxed?

And I'll offer this as well ... There is no (Fuel ; Tobacco aside ... I am not sure if there is anything else, but it could be heavy truck tires I think???) federal tax on most things in EE UU ...

BUT - EITHER WAY ... governments need their taxes from the tax base ... and they get their money to run one way or another. It really comes down to how transparent the process is.

I am dying for some feed back on my post from someone out there!

NC is kind of a medium tax state -- like 5% state income tax and like 4'ish percent sales tax. Good state university system if you have kids.

Labor market is pretty robust there -- a lot of growth as it's a low cost of living (and business operations) for the states.

To me, I'd be comparing cost of living between US (NC) and Argentina; and then tax issues if you have a substantial asset portfolio (securities, real estate, what have you).

From what you are describing, I am wondering if your analysis isn't simply whether your real estate income will afford you a decent standard of living back in Argentina?
 

jblaze5779

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I remember last time I went home and was driving down the highway in Houston I noticed how everyone was driving at relatively the same speed and staying in lanes. I was also pulled over within 45 minutes for speeding. My bad I forgot we had cops in cars.

Got a warning though so it was all good. Told my story of my parilous journey and pointed to all my boxes in the back of the truck. Showed my AR DL and Dni as a joke. Luckily the state trooper was in a good mood
 

dilmah

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one should get education in Argentina and work in the U.S.
Not the other way round.
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

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one should get education in Argentina and work in the U.S.
Not the other way round.
I have thought long and hard about what the ultimate job would be in Argentina ...

There is none that I can think of that pays anything attention grabbing.

So it all boils down to working remotely, or being well funded.

Any ideas?
 

on the brink

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don't have to support Trump in order to have right-wing ideas. By the way, where is the wall that he promised and that Mexico was to pay for?
Part of the wall is there, but Mexico is not paying for it - the American taxpayers are. Trump diverted funds from their proper allocations to build it.
 

UK Man

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After years of living in Scotland my Argentine wife has found coming back to live here increasingly hard as the years go by. She knew but hadn't realised just how far advanced in every area living in the UK is compared to here.

Must admit I liked living here because it was so far behind but that novelty has since worn off.
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

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After years of living in Scotland my Argentine wife has found coming back to live here increasingly hard as the years go by. She knew but hadn't realised just how far advanced in every area living in the UK is compared to here.

Must admit I liked living here because it was so far behind but that novelty has since worn off.
UK Man,

Curious to know if you would be so kind ... To get a sense of perspective ....

What was the range of years your Argentine wife lived in Scotland? (For example ... from 2005 to 2019???)

And, when did she return to her country to live? (For example ... since 2019???)

And, if possible to share with the board, what are the things she sees as the most challenging to adjust to or accept in Argentina, that are behind what she had in Scotland?

It would be great if you could share some insight, I think it would be very interesting to know.

Thanks!
 
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