BA Expat Indeed

semigoodlookin

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I have thought long and hard about what the ultimate job would be in Argentina ...

There is none that I can think of that pays anything attention grabbing.

So it all boils down to working remotely, or being well funded.

Any ideas?
Surely a relatively good position within the CFK regime, no?

I mean I know a relative who worked within the CFK government and now Alberto's, and he was getting things well beyond his means, including a house and a car. Under Macri things got more dicey for him, but now he is back involved. I don't like him enough to engage in a long conversation with him, but he has made it clear he gets plenty of money under the table and that it's normal to do so. I will not say what he specifically does within Frente para la Victoria/Frente de Todos, but it is a laughably nothing position and he is home most of the time as you would expect a good Noqui to be.
 

UK Man

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UK Man,

Curious to know if you would be so kind ... To get a sense of perspective ....

What was the range of years your Argentine wife lived in Scotland? (For example ... from 2005 to 2019???)

And, when did she return to her country to live? (For example ... since 2019???)

And, if possible to share with the board, what are the things she sees as the most challenging to adjust to or accept in Argentina, that are behind what she had in Scotland?

It would be great if you could share some insight, I think it would be very interesting to know.

Thanks!
We're talking about the last 20 odd years, the last 12 being here out here in the Province. She had travelled quite a lot before I came along mostly to Europe including the UK so she was no newbie when it came to travelling.She was an English teacher here.
As for differences. The main one is the monthly/long term management of your finances in the UK compared to here. You can shove £1000 in a drawer and forget about it in the UK knowing even when you come across it again in a years time you'll still be able to buy the same amount of goods for it.
To put it simply although it's certainly not all roses in the UK she thinks you can just get on with enjoying life there without the same worries/hassles that exist here.The uncertainty of it all here is the big negative and although I'm easy going it's the one which even bothers me the most....anything can happen here.
The weather's usually nicer here compared to Scotland right enough. :)
 

Redpossum

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The main one is the monthly/long term management of your finances in the UK compared to here. You can shove £1000 in a drawer and forget about it in the UK knowing even when you come across it again in a years time you'll still be able to buy the same amount of goods for it.
To put it simply although it's certainly not all roses in the UK she thinks you can just get on with enjoying life there without the same worries/hassles that exist here.The uncertainty of it all here is the big negative and although I'm easy going it's the one which even bothers me the most....anything can happen here.
The weather's usually nicer here compared to Scotland right enough. :)
I really understand what you mean on that subject. Everything is perpetually up in the air here. The simple business of receiving one's paycheck in the USA and moving the money here is a thing always in doubt. The factors involved change on an almost-daily basis.

Speaking of the long-term savings issue, is it possible to buy silver here at a close-to-market rate? The only silver coins I have seen for sale here are on Mercado Libre at twice their actual market value. In the USA one could walk into a coin shop and buy silver eagle or maple leaf coins, or even just 1-oz silver rounds, at a reasonable price. With all the money being printed in the USA, I am far from certain about the wisdom of using even the USD as a long-term hedge, and I don't think the Pound or the Euro are any better. We truly live in interesting times.
 

lnc

Registered
We're talking about the last 20 odd years, the last 12 being here out here in the Province. She had travelled quite a lot before I came along mostly to Europe including the UK so she was no newbie when it came to travelling.She was an English teacher here.
As for differences. The main one is the monthly/long term management of your finances in the UK compared to here. You can shove £1000 in a drawer and forget about it in the UK knowing even when you come across it again in a years time you'll still be able to buy the same amount of goods for it.
To put it simply although it's certainly not all roses in the UK she thinks you can just get on with enjoying life there without the same worries/hassles that exist here.The uncertainty of it all here is the big negative and although I'm easy going it's the one which even bothers me the most....anything can happen here.
The weather's usually nicer here compared to Scotland right enough. :)
Nice perspective. I have been living in the UK for 13 years now and, while I miss things from Argentina like friends and food, I do not complain of life here. I have a stable/ish job in the public sector which I find interesting and fairly well paid. And I love how professional the public service is. Each time I come back to Argentina (twice a year) I realise through little things like you mention above, why I could not live there again; unless I retire earlier.

The oped post is interesting as I also lived in the US for 5 years while doing my Phd and my wife is American. Yet, every time we go there while we acknowledge how dynamic the American econommy is, job opportunities, etc, we feel we would also struggle to live there: cost of living is much more expensive than here (and we live in London!), health (I pay 0£ here thanks to the National Health Service), food, having to drive everywhere etc...So bottom line I agree with your wife!...And BTW Scotland is beatiful!
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

Registered
I really understand what you mean on that subject. Everything is perpetually up in the air here. The simple business of receiving one's paycheck in the USA and moving the money here is a thing always in doubt. The factors involved change on an almost-daily basis.

Speaking of the long-term savings issue, is it possible to buy silver here at a close-to-market rate? The only silver coins I have seen for sale here are on Mercado Libre at twice their actual market value. In the USA one could walk into a coin shop and buy silver eagle or maple leaf coins, or even just 1-oz silver rounds, at a reasonable price. With all the money being printed in the USA, I am far from certain about the wisdom of using even the USD as a long-term hedge, and I don't think the Pound or the Euro are any better. We truly live in interesting times.
Usually at 1% markup if they are selling sharp!
 

UK Man

Registered
Nice perspective. I have been living in the UK for 13 years now and, while I miss things from Argentina like friends and food, I do not complain of life here. I have a stable/ish job in the public sector which I find interesting and fairly well paid. And I love how professional the public service is. Each time I come back to Argentina (twice a year) I realise through little things like you mention above, why I could not live there again; unless I retire earlier.

The oped post is interesting as I also lived in the US for 5 years while doing my Phd and my wife is American. Yet, every time we go there while we acknowledge how dynamic the American econommy is, job opportunities, etc, we feel we would also struggle to live there: cost of living is much more expensive than here (and we live in London!), health (I pay 0£ here thanks to the National Health Service), food, having to drive everywhere etc...So bottom line I agree with your wife!...And BTW Scotland is beatiful!
The most frustarting thing I find about living in Argentina is it's a superb country with lovely people. Sadly, it underperforms big time because it's led by those who continue to take full advantage of the system here. I honestly can't see it changing anytime soon thus it will just continue to underperform.
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

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The most frustarting thing I find about living in Argentina is it's a superb country with lovely people. Sadly, it underperforms big time because it's led by those who continue to take full advantage of the system here. I honestly can't see it changing anytime soon thus it will just continue to underperform.
I am going to beat this drum to death! For I truly believe ...

"Politics and economy aside, ARGENTINA is a GREAT COUNTRY!"

There is no other place I enjoy more or feel more at home on this earth.
 

UK Man

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I am going to beat this drum to death! For I truly believe ...

"Politics and economy aside, ARGENTINA is a GREAT COUNTRY!"

There is no other place I enjoy more or feel more at home on this earth.
Indeed. However I suspect my attitude as well as many others on here would soon change if we weren't as financially well off. And even then that could soon change in the future.
It's wise to have an escape plan.
 

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

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UK, I'll meet you half way, but that is as far as I care to go!

I agree that "OTHER PEOPLE" / "OTHERS" attitudes toward Argentina would be subject to change if their financial picture changed such that they actually had to earn a living there.

However, mine would not because I possess very little in the grand scheme of things. I do have stuff, but I am not drowning in it like so many others seem to be doing. Possessions are boat anchors around a person's neck once they go beyond the stuff you really want or need. I'd rather have quality than quantity. And if what I had was confiscated from me, I am in no way hurt all that much as I prize health, happiness and peace of mind along with good relationships. I try not to embrace what can't love me back.
 
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