Coping with the feeling of insecurity

rickulivi

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I think it was the rusian Pavlovw who came up with the concept of the pyramid of human needs. At the bottom there are the basic needs for food, shelter and security. At the top, their is enlightment. He indicated, therefore, that feeling secure is a very, very basic human need.

I have visited friends in Bs. As. who seem to live in, literally, cages inside their own homes. So, my question to you BA expats is simple: how do you cope with the feeling of insecurity that seems to be so prevalent in BA? I understand the city is safe, but insecurity is a lot like the weather: it doesn't need to be hot to feel warm. BA can be a safe city, but you can feel very insecure too. How do you cope?
 

Cath

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Actually, according to Maslow, basic physical needs are at the bottom of the heirarchy and therefore the most fundamental human need (need for food, water, basic bodily functions, etc). This almost certainly doesn't apply to the people you are talking about, but I think a very large percentage of the population here is busy worrying about where their next meal is coming from and not so worried about security.
 

JHB1216

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rickulivi said:
I have visited friends in Bs. As. who seem to live in, literally, cages inside their own homes. So, my question to you BA expats is simple: how do you cope with the feeling of insecurity that seems to be so prevalent in BA?
I have been living here for a few months and been visiting over the last 3 years. I have noticed the same thing. I believe that there is a distrust of the police that is part of the insecurity that you see in the security issues here. The people in the city are concerned more about the security of their personal property. I don't think that insurance is that prevalent here for personal property.
 

soulskier

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Many Argies, especialy porteños are paranoid. We rent properties in Bariloche and I can always tell if the renters are from BA because the ock the door behind them, put the blinds down, etc.
 

jp

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Stop reading or watching "the news". Its one thing to be informed, its another to read a morbid account of everything unpleasant to happen to anyone anywhere. Hysterical media doesn't help the feeling of insecurity.

Lost count of the number of people who have implored me to be careful. Not because I'm doing anything dangerous, just because I look obviously foreign and they want to help. I'm blonde and pale and don't exactly look porteños.

I cope with the "insecurity" by ignoring sensationalised account of how bad everything is. Works for me. BA is generally a very friendly city.
 

mcduh

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I believe it was the contemporary French feminist Hélène Cixous, who once said "The solution to most personal insecurities is to grow a pair, sucka."
 

Zenobia

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I'm hearing all the time from the porteñas that the city is not safe, not even in Recoleta or Barrio Norte. So, the advice I´ve followed is not to enter the apartment building if there´s anybody besides the portero hanging around near the door. Because sometimes criminals pretend that they live there too or know someone who lives there and will follow you inside. These people apparently always carry guns. I always look both ways before unlocking the front door, and usually, there´s nobody suspicious around. As for the rest, the building has a security camera, alarm systems, a complicated system of keys and locks, and up on the top floor, you don´t really have to worry about somebody crawling in through the window. That makes me feel safe. I just watch my bag and whatever else I have with me very closely and actually carry an extra cheap wallet filled with useless pieces of paper, old gift cards, and a bit of change to make it feel heavy and use it as a decoy. Besides that, I know some karate. Basically, I just take care and try to be inconspicuous
 
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