Crazy restaurant

Caribbean Cool

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I had gone to Anotnino Restorante on Jorge Newberry a couple of times. I was studying the bill yesterday, and notices a charge of 1500 pesos per person 'table charge'. I went in and gave them hell. Of course they did not remove the charge. I told them that next time I would sit on the floor to avoid the charge. NUTS????
 
I had gone to Anotnino Restorante on Jorge Newberry a couple of times. I was studying the bill yesterday, and notices a charge of 1500 pesos per person 'table charge'. I went in and gave them hell. Of course they did not remove the charge.

You lost your cool over a table charge of about one dollar and fifty cents per person?

I told them that next time I would sit on the floor to avoid the charge. NUTS????
Even though you used the word ·NUTS" to complain about the table charge at the restaurant, I imagine the server would use a similar word in Spanish to describe your response.

I imagine you already know that they wouldn't serve you if you actually sat on the floor for any reason......but, after reading this, I can't be certain.

PS: I appears by the way the post was written that you were dining alone. Though it doesn't seem likely to happen, if you ever return to the restaurant with others, I wuld love to see their reactions when you insist they also sit on the floor to avoid the table charges, 🤠
 
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Many restaurants charge a 'cubierto' fee. It's a table service charge and most times includes some bread, butter, still water or maybe a little extra (tiny cookie at a cafe, etc) or a lot extra (glass of champagne and sauces at certain steakhouses). It's common and, with inflation, I guess $1,500 really is on par with what amount it was years ago. Some restaurants ditched the cubierto charge but raised menu prices so, who knows.

For me, $1,500 when I'm choosing to go to a full service restaurant to eat isn't terrible, but this also doesn't go to the staff that serves your table, it goes to house. It's been customary in eating establishments here for as long as I remember. If you're concerned, I'd ask before ordering whether they charge a cubierto and how much it is...so you can dine accordingly but not be upset with the business for charging a fee that's quite normal and customary here.

The restaurant business is a tough one and many places are struggling to stay afloat now that costs for their rent, sourced food, electric bills...are skyrocketing. I try to be cognizant of that and go to places I really like, to support them so at least the fee goes to a place I really enjoy, in hopes they adjust to uncertain inflation and stick around. A small price to pay to keep places afloat in this uncertain climate. It's been hard on a lot of people living here, dining out is far less accessible but when I can, I like to support those institutions.

I don't want to see this city devolve into a landscape of chain restaurants and look-alike mini malls.The independent businesses here really contribute to the allure of the city. But, again, no shame in asking the fee before being seated so you can dine elsewhere if you'd like to avoid it, as plenty of places have just folded that fee into menu prices.
 
I havent been to Italy for a while, but the times I have been there, pretty much every restaurant charged a coperto. And since 60% of Argentines are of Italian descent, I am pretty sure thats where the cubierto comes from. I am told in Italy these days its 2 or 3 euros.
I have found that in the last 15 years, the number of restaurants that charge it in Buenos Aires declines every year. It used to be really common, especially for nicer restaurants. I think I have been charged it ONCE in the last few years.
So its always possible, but really rare these days.
 
I recently paid a table charge at Melo on Melo.
 
Pippo raised the cubierto to 400 from 100. Don’t mind paying, still a favorite spot. Went into bankruptcy in 2016. The original didn’t survive the pandemic but reopened in the new location doing well after the employees reopened as a employee owned restaurant.

 
I havent been to Italy for a while, but the times I have been there, pretty much every restaurant charged a coperto. And since 60% of Argentines are of Italian descent, I am pretty sure thats where the cubierto comes from. I am told in Italy these days its 2 or 3 euros.
I have found that in the last 15 years, the number of restaurants that charge it in Buenos Aires declines every year. It used to be really common, especially for nicer restaurants. I think I have been charged it ONCE in the last few years.
So its always possible, but really rare these days.

I confirm: paying for “coperto” in Italy is very common. Personally I don’t mind the small extra, as on the flip side tipping at the restaurant is not very common and can be done when particularly satisfied. Lately in the US tipping has become so ubiquitous that they often ask you for a tip even at takeaways. And don’t let me start complaining about when they add a tip automatically to the check and then ask you for an additional tip…
 
Pippo raised the cubierto to 400 from 100. Don’t mind paying, still a favorite spot. Went into bankruptcy in 2016. The original didn’t survive the pandemic but reopened in the new location doing well after the employees reopened as a employee owned restaurant.

Is the menu on the website up to date? Seems very cheap.
 
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