For those of you without a full time job, what do you all do in Argentina?

EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

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Back to the original question- my wife and I have a studio, and we make artworks. We also have a ton of friends we hang out with, go see a lot of live music (usually 3 or more nights a week) we go see museums and art shows, and explore the city constantly.
We actually spend some time maintaining our 100 plus year old apartment- I tend to do most things myself, except painting walls.. Plumbing, electrical, fixing the 100 year old stained glass- there is always something.
We cook a lot.
I am working on seeing all five railroad museums in greater buenos aires. 3 down- Retiro, Avellenada and Remedios de Escalada. I still need to get to Villa Lynch and the big Scalabrini one in Haedo. I recommend riding the little tranvia loop on Rivadavia, too, if you are at all a railfan.
I spend a fair amount of days going to lunch in a barrio I dont know, and wandering around, taking pictures.
I am a fan of architecture, and there are amazing buildings in pretty much every barrio. And I am a blacksmith, and the metalwork everywhere is world class- I have taken thousands of pictures, and even written about it for US blacksmithing publications.
Hey Ries,

I like what you are into!

There is a lot of satisfaction in DIY. (Save money as well and know the job was done correctly.) With all the resources out on the internet, there is someone with a how to video explaining what you need to or want to do.

Given you are into art ... the best art is cooking. EDIBLE ART!
 

Iznogud

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Emulating work is a consacrated activity in this country.
Hours, days, months, lifetimes dedicated entirely to not achieve a single thing.
Public administration jobs of any kind will assure you a carreer's salary and a Master's degree at this fine art.

Plenty of time wasters available, even hard to chose or set priorities.

Iz
 

antipodean

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This is a very good question that I have often wondered about (being in the same position of having two passports): Can they see on their system that the person entering Argentina on one passport is the same person who left the previous day on another passport?
I have multiple passports and asked if to use the one associated with my DNI and the response of my immigration lawyers and officers at the airport was that it doesn’t matter since the new system already in use by migraciones data matches and merges profiles so they see my movements on all passports.
 

on the brink

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I have multiple passports and asked if to use the one associated with my DNI and the response of my immigration lawyers and officers at the airport was that it doesn’t matter since the new system already in use by migraciones data matches and merges profiles so they see my movements on all passports.
What if the passports are under slightly different names?
 

jblaze5779

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Yeah I'm sure Argentina customs is on the leading edge of facial ID and bio-metrics technology implementation. They take the fingerprint and photo information but who knows if it actually goes anywhere. These guys are still pushing papers...
 

antipodean

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The technology is hardly new or cutting edge anywhere in the world anymore. If you watch their screens you can see the computer matching fingerprints and also the photos. The smart gates for Argentine citizens use a similar technology where the camera matches the faces to the database and the fingerprints also. Even in train stations here, there is facial recognition technology on the CCTVs that can match people against their DNI photo on the database and "follow" them for "security" purposes - technology purchased from China. The Argentine part of the equation is what does the operator sitting behind the computer screen do with that information and do they even care.
 

on the brink

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My hunch is, they don't bother with the average Joes. But they closely follow "grandes contribuidores" - big taxpayers such as wealthy business owners, investors, industrialists, ranchers, growers, etc. In short, anyone unwise enough to have a productive, thriving business.

Of course, politicians and gremialists are excluded from this list. Only entrepreneurs are milked.
 
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EL_TIGRE_de_Tigre

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My hunch is, they don't bother with the average Joes. But they closely follow "grandes contribuidores" - big taxpayers such as wealthy business owners, investors, industrialists, ranchers, growers, etc. In short, anyone unwise enough to have a productive, thriving business.

Of course, politicians and gremialists are excluded from this list. Only entrepreneurs are milked.
DON'T BET ON THAT!

With the power of computers and the simplicity of programming, any combination of search parameters can trigger a result for an immigration officer to check closer. In other words, with the power of a computer software program, each and every individual can be screened as they pass in and out of the country. The days of "MANUAL" are over even in the poorest countries. The tools are here to stay.

That would be my opinion on the subject.
 
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