Fresh Berries - Where To Find Them - Now, Tomorrow, Usual

lucha54

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Mercado Libre!!! My friend brought some frozen ones on Mercado Libre; there are services for restaurants as well as the general public. There are people with freezers full of berries ready to sell you, just search "[name of berry in Spanish] congelados". !!!
 

Redpossum

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Funny you mention it - we were just trying to figure out what scallions translates to in Spanish - puerro or cebolla de verdeo?
This is possibly just more Sponglish border talk, but try cebolletas.

In the Midwest and the West, we usually call them green onions, and I love 'em! Some good crackers, a slice of sharp cheddar, and a handful of green onions, oh yeah, snacktime for Possum!

But just to confuse the issue, there are also shallots, which some people call scallions...
 

Luis Villalba

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I agree with the other post about mercadolibre. You can get a kilo of frozen blueberries for 44 pesos (http://articulo.mercadolibre.com.ar/MLA-499051617-arandanos-congelados-calidad-iqf-entrega-gratis-ver-zonas-_JM) for example, or a mix of "frutos del bosque" (typically blueberries, raspberries, blackberries) for 56 pesos a kilo, for example: http://articulo.mercadolibre.com.ar/MLA-499051961-mix-de-frutos-rojos-del-bosque-congelados-calidad-iqf-_JM.
 

easyliving

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The discussion on blackberries brings to mind an issue I have had in other parts of the world. The dictionaries for english/xxx are often lacking or wrong about translations of food items, especially herbs and spices.
Where I live now has taken a lot of trial and error on herbs and spices.
Does anyone have a good resource for English/Spanish food/herb/spice translations?
I find the best way to translate is to use wikipedia... Find what you are looking for and then click the alternative language on the left. If the entry exists in both languages you will find a perfect translation. If you compare the latin linnaeus name of the fruit/vegetable in question, you can be sure you are talking about the same thing.
For example, see:
http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Blackberry
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mora_%28fruta%29
 

Alicia karr

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Get several bags or plastic see thru containers of either frozen mixed berries, blueberries or strawberries,(natural, no sugar added)always available at Jumbo and often at Disco. Perfect berries and come in ziplock type bags. Use them in my oatmeal every morning. Bon appetite!
 

SaltShaker

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[background=rgb(230, 230, 230)]ajoknoblauch - thanks for the referral. As far as I can tell the link is working - I just tried it. There's also a kindle and an ipad version available.[/background]
 

JoeGillis

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This is possibly just more Sponglish border talk, but try cebolletas.

In the Midwest and the West, we usually call them green onions, and I love 'em! Some good crackers, a slice of sharp cheddar, and a handful of green onions, oh yeah, snacktime for Possum!

But just to confuse the issue, there are also shallots, which some people call scallions...
Although scallion and shallot share their name source, they are different types of onion. Scallions (or green onions/spring onions) have longish green tops extending from a whitish bulb. Shallots are like small brown onions. The above picture shows shallots. The distinct name difference for these vegetables refers to English language usage only. In Argentina, eschalot is shallot, green onion is cebolla de verdeo.
 

Redpossum

Registered
Although scallion and shallot share their name source, they are different types of onion. Scallions (or green onions/spring onions) have longish green tops extending from a whitish bulb. Shallots are like small brown onions. The above picture shows shallots. The distinct name difference for these vegetables refers to English language usage only. In Argentina, eschalot is shallot, green onion is cebolla de verdeo.
Obviously I need to work on my writing skills, this is like the 15th time I've been misunderstood here. Yes, I understand they're different, and that's what I was trying to say. My bad, I'm sure :)

But thanks very much for the correct Spanish names, that info will go in my notes right now! I am compiling info to begin a glossary, which I think we need, along with an FAQ.
 

Chet

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I saw fresh raspberries in a market this morning and remembered this thread, I guess they do exist here. :)
 
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