Giving birth - Argentina or Chile ?

Giving birth - Argentina or Chile ?


  • Total voters
    13

Idois

Registered
Hi,

We are Canadian. We have never been to either country. We will have a baby in July. I want our child to have another passport. We have some questions
1. Which country would offer the best citizenship and passport, to complement to the Canadian one?
2. Which citizenship will have better value, 20 years from now (when my child grow up)
3. To play devil's advocate, can someone explain to me that giving birth in either country is not a wise decision.

Thank you very much

I am a big proponent of multiple citizenships. For me, it is a matter of personal freedom to live, move around, work and bank in different economies, etc.. It can be challenging to have more than 2 citizenships in some instances, but it is also quite possible to easily keep them apart and use them strategically.

You have mentioned that you want your child's country of birth to be Spanish speaking. I am wondering perhaps why Spansih speaking as opposed to Portuguese speaking for example, and how flexible would you be on this condition. Panama, Mexico, Ecuador and Peru (maybe even Brasil) may be other options to consider. And if you are not so strict about Spanish, there are countries in Europe which are not yet in the EU and grant citizenship ius soli and allow dual/multiple citizenships. Do you have a more specific long term goal in mind?

While I cannot advise you to pursue a specific path because I have very limited information, I would encourage you to explore further and pursue this idea. I would also, if it were my kid, look for ius soli citizenship that covers potential future benefits such as education, legal protection, maybe health care (although I am not opposed to purchasing my own coverage), and also a citizenship that paves the path for deriving other citizenships (either through reduced residency in a target country or other means).

If you do not mind please let us know what you have decided or what you are considering. I would be interested to hear your reasoning.

Wishing you all the best!
 

MapleMan

Registered
Although I know several families with a mix of natural born and adopted children which live together in harmony, I know others which, despite the best efforts of the parents to treat each of the children equally, have broken into terrible squabbles and malignant vindictiveness between them all. How do you foresee family life in the future - say twenty years time - where one child has been specially selected to have certain extra freedoms and privileges and the other two not?
I didn't have money and time to do for my first two kids. Now I do. I can't pass this opportunity for the sake of equality. I think citizenship is the better gift to my kid than money. My kid can squander money, but not citizenship.
 

MapleMan

Registered
I am a big proponent of multiple citizenships. For me, it is a matter of personal freedom to live, move around, work and bank in different economies, etc.. It can be challenging to have more than 2 citizenships in some instances, but it is also quite possible to easily keep them apart and use them strategically.

You have mentioned that you want your child's country of birth to be Spanish speaking. I am wondering perhaps why Spansih speaking as opposed to Portuguese speaking for example, and how flexible would you be on this condition. Panama, Mexico, Ecuador and Peru (maybe even Brasil) may be other options to consider. And if you are not so strict about Spanish, there are countries in Europe which are not yet in the EU and grant citizenship ius soli and allow dual/multiple citizenships. Do you have a more specific long term goal in mind?

While I cannot advise you to pursue a specific path because I have very limited information, I would encourage you to explore further and pursue this idea. I would also, if it were my kid, look for ius soli citizenship that covers potential future benefits such as education, legal protection, maybe health care (although I am not opposed to purchasing my own coverage), and also a citizenship that paves the path for deriving other citizenships (either through reduced residency in a target country or other means).

If you do not mind please let us know what you have decided or what you are considering. I would be interested to hear your reasoning.

Wishing you all the best!
Thank you for your response. I don't know any European country has jus soli law. Can you list them?
The citizenship is mainly for my unborn child. I heard Argentina has easier citizenship process for parent. Perhaps I could get my children Argentina citizenship if I acquired one.
 

jantango

Registered
Is your wife in agreement on removing your children from the home they know for two months or more, traveling a great distance during the last weeks of pregnancy to an unknown foreign city where neither of you speak the language, locating a rental apartment for the family, finding a doctor to deliver the baby at a hospital, and completely disrupt your stable life in Canada just to get citizenship for a newborn where you never intend on living?

That is more stress than anyone can imagine at a time of incredible stress for a pregnant woman. Consider the family and do the right thing for them.
 

MapleMan

Registered
Is your wife in agreement on removing your children from the home they know for two months or more, traveling a great distance during the last weeks of pregnancy to an unknown foreign city where neither of you speak the language, locating a rental apartment for the family, finding a doctor to deliver the baby at a hospital, and completely disrupt your stable life in Canada just to get citizenship for a newborn where you never intend on living?

That is more stress than anyone can imagine at a time of incredible stress for a pregnant woman. Consider the family and do the right thing for them.
All things considered, I am not doing it for myself but for family. I think she would understand. I'm the one who sacrifice as I am 100% financially responsible, my income lost due to 2 months time off would be significant. That's why I'm asking question here. Is Argentina passport worth ten of thousand dollars ?
 

MapleMan

Registered
Another question: How can I keep money safely. I imagine I would need to bring in thousands of dollars in cash to pay for a hotel, cost of delivery, living expenses. Is there another way to manage money as a tourist ?
 

mulderfox

Active Member
Another question: How can I keep money safely. I imagine I would need to bring in thousands of dollars in cash to pay for a hotel, cost of delivery, living expenses. Is there another way to manage money as a tourist ?
you can also use a credit card. now is it woth it? well you are the one that wants to do it!.
also we don't know how much money is a lot of money to you!.
one thing to consider about argentina is that getting past the border and actually inside the country for the rest of your family (as foreigners) will be much easier than doing so in a more "normal" country.
you can just enter as a tourist and then ask for a status change without leaving the country.
 

MatameBA

Newcomer
Is Argentina passport worth ten of thousand dollars ?
Short answer:

No.

You said you want your child to have a passport from a country that has a "political and economic future"...

So, you chose Argentina?

You really haven't done your research.

The economy here is in a near-constant state of crisis. Salaries are low. Opportunities are few. Corruption is rampant. And you sure as hell don't want to stash your savings in an Argentine bank. Argentina has been this way for over a century. I don't see that changing in the next 20 years.

Be aware that you're about to put your wife and family through a ton of stress for what could amount to very little benefit. And god forbid your wife has any complications during childbirth, because now you're stuck in complicated situation in a foreign country.

Go put all the money you would have spent onto this trip into an investment account for your kid. Have him use the money to travel abroad when he's old enough. Or at least have the kid in a Caribbean island that's also a tax haven. At least your kid will get some benefit from that passport.

Suerte!
 
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