Global recession and Argentina

BartyBoy

Newcomer
If I have a talent for anything it seems to sending everyone off topic. Well never mind at least it gets entertaining.
It must be your only talent tango, it's obviously not politics.
 

tangobob

Veteran
It must be your only talent tango, it's obviously not politics.
You soon learned how to throw a insult when you run out of arguments.
 

Matty

Active Member
Sergio, how do you think this global recession is affecting Argentina? What have been your direct experience in this regard..not talking about USA or UK..just how it affected you in Argentina?
Thanks for sharing...
 

bigbadwolf

Registered
"tangobob" said:
Now that is one thing that would make me vote Tory
I'm going completely off-topic here (because it's more fun discussing British politics). Rik Mayall resurrected Alan B'stard in 2005 in West End theatre when B'stard changed his colours and became a "New Labour" MP: goes to show what ideological soulmates Thatcherism and "New Labour" really are if a character like B'stard is credible in his new role.
I wonder if even the Monster Raving Loony Party could bugger up the British economy as much as Thatcher did in her initial years. I admit my life has been a joyless one but one genuinely happy day I had was when Thatcher got the boot and broke down in tears three times as she exited 10 Downing Street (for the last time) to her limousine. Three cheers for Heseltine, Clarke, and all the others who did what was so long overdue.
 

tangobob

Veteran
I wonder if even the Monster Raving Loony Party could bugger up the British economy as much as Thatcher did in her initial years. I admit my life has been a joyless one but one genuinely happy day I had was when Thatcher got the boot and broke down in tears three times as she exited 10 Downing Street (for the last time) to her limousine. Three cheers for Heseltine, Clarke, and all the others who did what was so long overdue.
Well! we may have completely polarised views of the future, but here I am right with you.
 

BartyBoy

Newcomer
If she buggered up the country that bad how come her succesor was voted in as the next prime minister?
You must look at the seventies through rose coloured spectacles.
 

bigbadwolf

Registered
"BartyBoy" said:
If she buggered up the country that bad how come her succesor was voted in as the next prime minister?
John Major only had a 20-seat majority, which kept getting whittled away. Very difficult to carry out a legislative programme with that kind of majority. The Labour party kept shooting itself in the foot -- leaders like Michael Foot, Neal Kinnock, and (briefly) John Smith. Once they had someone like Blair -- youthful, charming, fork-tongued, with a dazzling white smile, they swept into office with a massive majority in the Commons.
Admittedly, the Labour party didn't do a good job in the late '70s -- what with party hacks like James Callaghan. But Thatcher was an unmitigated disaster. Unemployment was about 1 million when she came into office. Three years later it stood at 3 million and climbing. The hopes of a generation were permanently blighted.
 

tangobob

Veteran
The conservatives did not do so great either Ted Heath presided over the three day week, and the Winter of discontent,and do not forget in 1974 we had 25% inflation. Try saving for a deposit on a house when the prices of property were rising at about 50% per annum.
 

bigbadwolf

Registered
"tangobob" said:
The conservatives did not do so great either Ted Heath presided over the three day week,
That was because of the coal miners' strike. But it was enough to bring down poor Heath, whom I've always admired.
and the Winter of discontent,and do not forget in 1974 we had 25% inflation. Try saving for a deposit on a house when the prices of property were rising at about 50% per annum.
The "Winter of Discontent" -- taken from Shakespeare's Richard III -- refers to the winter of 1978, when Callaghan was in office, and was coined by the Tories to refer to the extraordinary numbers of strikes that took place during that period.
 

tangobob

Veteran
The "Winter of Discontent" -- taken from Shakespeare's Richard III -- refers to the winter of 1978, when Callaghan was in office, and was coined by the Tories to refer to the extraordinary numbers of strikes that took place during that period.
You are right my error, but you cannot blame the miners alone for the inflation during the Heath period. My memory is a bit hazy now but as I recall the miners strike was towards the end of a year where we had monthly increments to keep up with the rising prices.
 
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