Happy Birthday America!!

Bond0023

Newcomer
Don't you mean Happy Birthday North America, Napoleon? Why is it that many North Americans call their country 'America'?
 

austin

Member
The Americans who have written hate messages here should renounce their US citizenship and apply for Argentine citizenship. When, if ever, they want or need to visit the country they despise - the United States of America - they can apply for a visa like every other Argentine. Regarding the use of the term "North America" - North America comprises Canada, the US and a large part of Mexico.
 

ghost

Registered
"Bond0023" said:
Don't you mean Happy Birthday North America, Napoleon?
Why is it that many North Americans call their country 'America'?
The official name of the country is The United States of America. It is the only country in the Americas that incorporates the word America. Thus, the short form "America" became a defacto reference. Started by Europeans and then it simply found it way into general useage.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
"ghost" said:
Don't you mean Happy Birthday North America, Napoleon?
Why is it that many North Americans call their country 'America'?


The official name of the country is The United States of America. It is the only country in the Americas that incorporates the word America. Thus, the short form "America" became a defacto reference. Started by Europeans and then it simply found it way into general useage.
Thank you, ghost. I' hadn't thought of it in that context. Now I'll have a pleasant response to anyone who says (with real or mock indignation), "We are ALL Americans!" (in this hemisphere). Funny thing, most of those same individuals also love to bash the US with great fervor. With many Europeans, it is almost a knee jerk reaction.
A few years ago a French film "Le American" has its debut at the Cann Film Festival. One memorable line from the film was "Everyone wants to be an American." Of course the line referred to only one country in the world. It was delivered,by the most amazing coincidence, by my high school girlfriend, Shelley, who I had not seen in almost 35 years and is now an actress living in Paris.
The following summer I was in Paris and, using a google search, found that she was living there. Her phone number was also listed. We met and had dinner at her flat. A Dutch friend of hers joined us for drinks and almost instantly began a tirade against Americans, using the term "typical American" repeatedly with great condescension. After a while, I turned to the Dutchess and asked, "If you detest Americans so much, how can you have Shelley as a friend?" Shelley did not wait for her friend to respond and declared with great indignation, "I am not an American, I am European!" I left shortly after that.I am an American who still has great respect for the principles upon which my home country was founded (individual rights and limited government). It's history is far from perfect, and some of its actions have been indefensible. Most, however, have proved great benefit to the rest of the world, especially Europe in the 20th Century.When I have told Argentine professionals (mostly doctors) I have encountered in BA that I live here and am happy to be doing so, at least half of them have shaken their heads in amazement and commented on the irony of my desire to live here and their desire to live in "America".That's what they call it, too (as well as just the "United States"). One or two of them might call me something other than an "American" behind my back (probably a "Yankee"), but that wouldn't bother me in the least.
 

RWS

Veteran
I thank you, Steve, for a calm recounting of what many of us who've lived abroad encounter. Among the better-educated and more refined classes in western Europe and Argentina, in my experience of many years, the United States are indeed as commonly referred to as "America" as they are called "the United States" (in England, perhaps even more often called "America"). And, the occasional or even extreme failing not excluded, both the country and its people are generally regarded well, often affectionately.
 

bigbadwolf

Registered
"steveinbsas" said:
The following summer I was in Paris and, using a google search, found that she was living there and her phone number was also listed. We met and had dinner at her flat. A Dutch friend of hers joined us for drinks and almost instantly began a tirade against Americans, using the term "typical American" repeatedly with great condescension. After a while, I turned to her and asked, "If you detest Americans so much, how can you have Shelley as a friend?" Shelley did not wait for her friend to respond and declared with great indignation, "I am not an American, I am European!" I left shortly after that.
I am an American who still has great respect for the principles upon which my home country was founded (individual rights and limited government). It's history is far from perfect, and some of its actions have been indefensible. Most, however, have proved great benefit to the rest of the world, especially Europe in the 20th Century.
The Europeans are hypocrites. The Americans are acting and have acted just like any other great power -- and these actions have nothing to do with "moral principles." The actions are based, rather, on cold calculation and expediency. US involvement in both world wars was based on this (as was the earlier Spanish-American war, when the US came of age as a great power). Now that the Europeans don't have anything at stake, and nestle under the American military umbrella, it's cheap and easy to take potshots at the United States. It's no better or worse than Britain, Holland, Spain, and France were in their heyday.
 

Dudester

Veteran
Yeah, but BBWolf, You'd think there was some enlightenment since we are more sophisticated these days - so they say. The way I see it it's not France's heyday anymore so I find them very pleasant. Whatever the European countries were once upon a time they are no more which makes them much more pleasant (except for the A-holes at Heathrow who still get on little power trips) and, America should have learned from Europe's (and History's) mistakes - but the human Colostomy Bag (GWB) forgot to do his homework. You know, the big bully on the block is always much more friendly once he'd had his ass kicked good and hard. Right now I'm TOTALLY ashamed to be an American (thanks to the NEOCONS and the whore in the White House). Obama is the light at the end of the tunnel, at least superficially - Substantially? Those who REALLY control the USA won't let him - the leash will be very tight. Dudester (as always, when all is said and done I do agree with you about 95% of the time).
 

bigbadwolf

Registered
"Dudester" said:
You'd think there was some enlightenment since we are more sophisticated these days - so they say.
We don't change that fast. It would take tens of thousands of years, maybe more. Probably never. It's my growing conviction that nature is red in tooth and claw, and we are nature's children. If we go back a million years, I'm sure we'd find one group of primates wiping out another. "Civilisation" is a smokescreen for what we are.
The way I see it it's not France's heyday anymore so I find them very pleasant. Whatever the European countries were once upon a time they are no more which makes them much more pleasant ...
Their nature hasn't changed: they've merely been reduced to a pack of toothless old dogs.
Right now I'm TOTALLY ashamed to be an American (thanks to the NEOCONS and the whore in the White House). Obama is the light at the end of the tunnel, at least superficially - Substantially? Those who REALLY control the USA won't let him - the leash will be very tight. Dudester (as always, when all is said and done I do agree with you about 95% of the time).
It's naive to think that the US has suddenly become this very bad power since GWB and the neo-cons took over. And it's equally naive entertain any hope concerning Obama. Obama is a typical Democrat sell-out. The only difference between Obama and McCain is their skin pigmentation. I can see hardly any difference in their "policies." Every four years, Americans are told: this election really matters; this one will involve a fundamental rupture with the past; everything is at stake. And after the election nothing changes. It doesn't matter what clown is at the helm, since the decisions are made elsewhere, and they follow a loigc that has nothing to do with popular interests.
 
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