Hi, I am brand new... just signed up this morning.

Status
Not open for further replies.

BA Don

Registered
#1
My first trip to Buenos Aires was two weeks ago... my wife and I fell in love with this marvelous “European” city and we are now exploring the idea of relocating... Can anyone recommend a knowledgeable realtor that speaks English? Though I live in and was raised in Los Angeles, I have not experienced the life of living in a big city and that’s one of the many draws to Buenos Aires. I can use a lot of help from you knowledgeable people.
 
#2
Apologies in advance for not answering your actual question and giving you unsolicited advice.

That said, I'd strongly recommend you take an extended visit out here, 2-6 months would be ideal in my view.

It's a great country and culture , but it's not for everyone.

After a prolonged stay you'd be far better placed to know if it's really a good idea.

You'll have many here tell you it's a terriblle idea, that the country is crime ridden, corrupt, on an economic death spiral, amoungst other things.

Still, if you do your homework and research, it may be for you!

A couple of parting comments; if you relocate and have earnings from remote work, investments, savings, income etc, as opposed to locally sourced wages, you'll be far more likely to make it work.

Also, check soloduenos, Zonaprop, argenprop, or other similar realestate websites to get a feel for the market and the established big name real estate agents.

Personally I wouldn't go with a local expat agent type person. You'll pay a premium and could probably do far better solo. Again, this takes time , research, patience.

Good Luck!!
 

Ries

Registered
#4
I would agree- come down for a couple of months, and see how the day to day agrees with you. Its got its good points, and bad points, and different people feel differently about the experience.
That said, I bought a place here after having been here for one week, on my first visit, and havent regretted it for one minute.
Of course, that was in 2007, and prices were much lower then.

Real estate agents here vary. We were very lucky all the way through our purchase and remodel, but you certainly hear horror stories.
Ease into it- spend some time checking out different neighborhoods.
 
#6
Unless you speak fluent Spanish, you are going to need a lot of help. I had come here for years before my retirement. So I knew exactly where I wanted to live. But I could not have done anything without help. I love living here, but it's not for everyone. Come for at least three months, six would be better and live like a citizen not a tourist. Then you will know what life is here.
 
#7
These members are giving you great advice. Aztangogirl makes a very key point concerning Spanish. My first trip was on business and I had a translator. Spanish or Castellano can be a bit tricky at times in Argentina. Argentinians have a unique dialect and can speak very quickly at times making it difficult to understand them. Even after almost 10 years, I still have to ask them to slow down and pronounce their words completely at times. Here in the north they often blend words and do not pronounce the S. So they might say Nos Vamos sounding like on word Novamo or Dos No Mas as Donoma which made it difficult for me the first few years. So if you do decide to delve into Espanol for Argentina look into Castellano.
 
#8
Is this post for real? Does someone really get off the plane and immediately decide to buy property and settle down in a foreign country without investigating tax laws, visa requirements, banking laws and restrictions and a myriad of other critical issues. We need to hear more from the individual who originated this post before giving a lot of advice.
 
#9
Is this post for real? Does someone really get off the plane and immediately decide to buy property and settle down in a foreign country without investigating tax laws, visa requirements, banking laws and restrictions and a myriad of other critical issues. We need to hear more from the individual who originated this post before giving a lot of advice.

I know a lot of people who got just off the boat as they say and brought a property in Argentina. Nothing unusual at all . Life Is about living and if it makes one happy to buy here who are we to judge
 

Ries

Registered
#10
Is this post for real? Does someone really get off the plane and immediately decide to buy property and settle down in a foreign country without investigating tax laws, visa requirements, banking laws and restrictions and a myriad of other critical issues. We need to hear more from the individual who originated this post before giving a lot of advice.
The Original Poster did NOT do this- but I did, in 2007. And it was one of the best decisions of my life.
I was both incredibly lucky in who I met and how they helped me (escribano, lawyer, contractor, etc) AND, pretty knowledgeable about real estate, foreign travel, and construction.
It all turned out great for me, but I cant say anyone else could necessarily repeat my success.

We rented an apartment for a week, and, at the end of the week, got our $700 US deposit back, and used it as an initial payment to begin the process of our purchase. True story.
And now, I live in that apartment 3 months out of every year.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top