Hi, I am brand new... just signed up this morning.

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#11
Nancy and I came to Buenos Aires in 2008 on the advice of our daughter. We were here for 3 days and hired a person to help us find an apartment. This is not to say that you shouldn't live here for 6 months before jumping in. But some people know what they want and do it. I haven't regretted our decision for one day. Buenos Aires is wonderful and a challenge. A quote I saw when we first arrived says it all.

"It is true that is a bit of a step backwards when it comes to efficiency and infrastructure, but if you open your mind, breathe deep, and enjoy the culture, it is fantastic. It's like the twilight zone here. One foot in the first world, one foot in the third world, one arm in the 50's and one arm in the 80's...with many fingers in the 21st century. " unknown author.

Visas are easy, residency is easy, prices are good. From your picture I assume you are retired and living off of dollars.

Good luck and please let us know what's happening.

T/
 

mmoon

Active Member
#13
Great advice here all around. I do know that some of the responders live in BA only part time. I would be curious if the new BAExpat plans to live here full time, because having the option and means to leave makes it a whole different experience.
We also came here for the first time for two weeks in Jan 2002, just after the 5 presidents in 2 weeks debacle and during the corralito, and people (mostly Argentines) thought we we’re crazy to sign a purchase contact before we even left the country. We have never regretted it, but it was not easy at all, and my husband is a native Spanish speaker. I think motivated people should go for it, but have a safety net! Also, I would wait to buy anything right now because prices are high but it feels unfortunately like some really significant economic collapse is coming.
That all said, I still love BA and Argentina.
 
#14
Great advice here all around. I do know that some of the responders live in BA only part time. I would be curious if the new BAExpat plans to live here full time, because having the option and means to leave makes it a whole different experience.
We also came here for the first time for two weeks in Jan 2002, just after the 5 presidents in 2 weeks debacle and during the corralito, and people (mostly Argentines) thought we we’re crazy to sign a purchase contact before we even left the country. We have never regretted it, but it was not easy at all, and my husband is a native Spanish speaker. I think motivated people should go for it, but have a safety net! Also, I would wait to buy anything right now because prices are high but it feels unfortunately like some really significant economic collapse is coming.
That all said, I still love BA and Argentina.
To answer your question we are planning on living there approximately six months out of the year… our income will be in American dollars…
Both my wife and I are overwhelmed by the welcoming support... The more I learn the more I like the idea of making the transition to BA...
 
#15
To answer your question we are planning on living there approximately six months out of the year… our income will be in American dollars…
In that case you will have NO problems with migraciones regarding residency and NO problems with AFIP regarding taxes unless you buy an apartment and rent it out when you are not in Argentina and fail to collect and pay the IVA on the rental income.

This would become a problem if and when, as a non-resident, you decide to sell the apartment. AFIP will look at the utility bills and cross check the usage with the entry and exit stamps in your passports. If the utility usage doesn't drop to near zero while you are out of the country, they will assume the apartment has been rented and charge the tax plus a very high rate of interest before you will receive permission to sell.

It won't matter if you let friends use the apartment when you are not in Argentina

Even if you don't rent it to others, be sure to pay the annual bienes personales (personal wealth) tax which will only apply to the value of the apartment. As a non-resident (tourist) your foreign assets and income are not taxable in Argentina.

As far as I know, you will never receive an invoice for this relatively small tax. You will receive a bill for the annual city property taxes.
 

Ries

Registered
#17
I know a bunch of americans who come down part of the year. Its a good way to go- it enables you to bring with you the few things you cant buy here- usually expensive electronics, but also things like cheap high quality sheets, or specialty cookware, or oddball hobby supplies. While prices have gone up a lot here, they are still cheap compared to LA, where I lived from 84-95. The reasons to come down and live for a while before buying are many- but one of the biggest is to learn where you want to live. Some people prefer quieter, more residential areas, others to be right in the thick of things. I know expats who live downtown, in the area where there is not much going on at night, more offices- but they have amazing apartments for less. Others who want the full luxury experience of Recoleta. I know people who have very cheap, simple places a bit off the more fancy neighborhoods, like Villa Crespo- again, your dollar goes further. Some like the urban funk of San Telmo. Others, single family houses in Belgrano R. Some want a modern building, with views, pool, gym, and underground parking. Some, like me, prefer hundred year old apartments with high ceilings, period woodwork, plaster, and tile. There are a lot of different Buenos Aires to be had.
 

Carmen

Just Joined
#19
My advice is to consider double taxation as there is no treaty between the US and Argentina regarding taxes, you may ask an accountant for that. Also my advice is that you obtain legal residency (DNI).
 
#20
My advice is to consider double taxation as there is no treaty between the US and Argentina regarding taxes, you may ask an accountant for that. Also my advice is that you obtain legal residency (DNI).
Your advice is spot on,for anyone planning on living in Argentina year round. but as Don has already indicated that he and his wife are planning on spending about six months of the year in Argentina, if they keep their stays to just under six months they will never have to worry about double taxation, getting a DNI (which is only granted with legal residency), or even paying an overstay fee (if they get a prorroga de permanencia).

PS: Neither will they have to worry about being denied reentry for having "too many stamps" in their passports.
 
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