If I use someone else's DNI for online purchases, will they be responsible for paying for it in their income tax?

fattyexpatty

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I'm originally from the US and currently living with my boyfriend who's an Argentine citizen. After looking around, I'm finding that it's not easy to do things here without a DNI (if not outright impossible), which seems to include getting a SIM card or a bank account without potentially being reported for overstaying. In the event I go through the trouble to get a bank account or prepaid card under my name but use my boyfriend's DNI to register/pay for things (e.g. MercadoLibre or flights), will the information be reported back to the Argentine equivalent of their IRS and will he be responsible for including those payments in his income tax?

If the question doesn't make sense, please let me know.
 

wrangler

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Hi, from what I understand, NO. Those records are not looked at. I have bought thousands of dollars worth of electronics, always having to show my DNI, and I have never heard a thing from the AFIP, I am registered with them. I am a monotributista here. I have never heard any issue with this from anyone else.

On the issue of your possible overstay, I doubt that you would EVER be reported. It would most likely only be noticed at the airport by immigration authorities when you are leaving. It's not like in The U.S. We don't have detention centers here, and people are not deported.
 

fattyexpatty

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Hi, from what I understand, NO. Those records are not looked at. I have bought thousands of dollars worth of electronics, always having to show my DNI, and I have never heard a thing from the AFIP, I am registered with them. I am a monotributista here. I have never heard any issue with this from anyone else.

On the issue of your possible overstay, I doubt that you would EVER be reported. It would most likely only be noticed at the airport by immigration authorities when you are leaving. It's not like in The U.S. We don't have detention centers here, and people are not deported.
Thanks for your response!
And with regard to the reporting, there was some speculation that banks/official entities are obligated to report tourist overstays in the event I open a bank account or something and use it past the 90 day mark. I know the consequences aren't that heavy, but I also don't want to needlessly be flagged and test my luck in becoming the unlucky one to be barred for multiple entries/overstaying 😅
 

wrangler

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Thanks for your response!
And with regard to the reporting, there was some speculation that banks/official entities are obligated to report tourist overstays in the event I open a bank account or something and use it past the 90 day mark. I know the consequences aren't that heavy, but I also don't want to needlessly be flagged and test my luck in becoming the unlucky one to be barred for multiple entries/overstaying 😅
If anything, you would only have to pay a fine. you can always apply for an extension to your visa. Also, applying for residency here is not difficult either.
 

fattyexpatty

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If anything, you would only have to pay a fine. you can always apply for an extension to your visa. Also, applying for residency here is not difficult either.
I briefly into filing temporary residency, but it seems a bit more complicated... I'd have to get a lot of documents legitimized/notarized by the Argentine courts and also give proof of my income, right? I work remotely and am not employed by any Argentine entity, so that might complicate things as well?
 

arvest

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If anything, you would only have to pay a fine. you can always apply for an extension to your visa. Also, applying for residency here is not difficult either.
What is the easy path to residency for remote working Americans? I see the student visa and rentista visa floated often but for a remote worker they don't see to fit neatly in either of those categories
 

Kula

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I briefly into filing temporary residency, but it seems a bit more complicated... I'd have to get a lot of documents legitimized/notarized by the Argentine courts and also give proof of my income, right? I work remotely and am not employed by any Argentine entity, so that might complicate things as well?
sorry but you sound clueless concerning residency. No single document is needed to get "legitimized/notarized by the Argentine courts". In fact I dont even know what it means


If you apply for residency its DNM. If citizenship - court.
You need 1) choose type of residency you fit it, google it "radicaciones residencia temporaria no mercosur"
2) prepare your documents according to the list
3) any foreign document must be apostillled in the cpuntry where a document was issued (if possible, for ex you cant get apostille for a passport, but all the rest-yes) and translated by translator who has matricula in "collegio de traductores publicos" (google it to find a list of translators).
Once again you first should get apostile your docuemnts back home and only after its ok to translate.
 

Kula

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What is the easy path to residency for remote working Americans? I see the student visa and rentista visa floated often but for a remote worker they don't see to fit neatly in either of those categories
NOMAD visa
 
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