Immigration For Dummies

I have a question about renewing permanent residency. I am marrying my girlfriend of 12 years and moving here. We are getting married and my documents are almost here to apply for permanent residency immediately. I am sure there will be stumbling blocks, but I am assured I will get it after jumping through all the hoops. My question is what is needed in a couple of years to renew my permanent residency? Am I going to have to go through all the same steps again? Or do they just basically ask if you are still married and for proof that you have been living here and paying taxes? We are planning to have children and I know that will cinch me for citizenship at some point, which I likely will pursue. But until I can apply for citizenship (5 years I hear), does anyone know the process for renewing permanent residency. While it is a couple years before I would have to do this, I am wondering if the same hassle i am facing now is what I will face then. Thanks.
 
I have a question about renewing permanent residency. I am marrying my girlfriend of 12 years and moving here. We are getting married and my documents are almost here to apply for permanent residency immediately. I am sure there will be stumbling blocks, but I am assured I will get it after jumping through all the hoops. My question is what is needed in a couple of years to renew my permanent residency? Am I going to have to go through all the same steps again? Or do they just basically ask if you are still married and for proof that you have been living here and paying taxes? We are planning to have children and I know that will cinch me for citizenship at some point, which I likely will pursue. But until I can apply for citizenship (5 years I hear), does anyone know the process for renewing permanent residency. While it is a couple years before I would have to do this, I am wondering if the same hassle i am facing now is what I will face then. Thanks.
I have good news for you, pilgrim.

Permanent residency is permanent. it does not have to be renewed. You only have to be sure to set foot on Argentine soil once every two years, even if you got back on a plane and left the same day. You should never have to return to migraciones. Your DNI will be good for about fifteen years. and you will be able to renew it at an office of the Registro, not migraciones.

You do not have to wait five years to apply for citizenship. There is a two year "residency" requirement, but your "residency" (for citizenship purposes) may have started the first day you set foot on Argentine soil.

The five year waiting period was based on an "obsolete" requirement of three years of temporary residency followed by two years of permanent residency, but as long as you have permanent residency there really isn't any pressure for you to become a citizen.

Well, at least not yet.


PS: As soon as you have your DNI you can go to the federal court that has jurisdiction where you are living and ask when they'll accept your application for citizenship to start the process and what documentation is required.
 
Citizenship Price List



Notes:
1. Satisfying ONE (1) of the 3 options (Buy Property OR Invest in Business OR Donation) gets you immediate [background=transparent]Residency [/background]
2. Residency in any single EU country = a permit to live and work in ALL EU countries.
3. Unspecified values in the (Invest in Business) implies that it is the same value as (Buy Property).
4. Paraguay sounds like an EXEPTIONALLY UNMATCHED GRAND BARGIN !!!!!!!
 
there is no citizenship in paraguay in 6 months. Pls dont mislead people.

I hang out with the Judges and ministers in PY and they would be mad if they see this post of yours.

you must be a permananent resident for 3 years to qualify, show ties with the country live there for major part of the 3 years and 9 different ministers + preseident must sign and approve yr citizenship. And you have to pass a v difficult exam with 75% marks, about paraguay's history, Geography, civil science, be able to recite the national anthemn exactly by words etc...in Spanish.
 
I have good news for you, pilgrim.

Permanent residency is permanent. it does not have to be renewed. You only have to be sure to set foot on Argentine soil once every two years, even if you got back on a plane and left the same day. You should never have to return to migraciones. Your DNI will be good for about fifteen years. and you will be able to renew it at an office of the Registro, not migraciones.

You do not have to wait five years to apply for citizenship. There is a two year "residency" requirement, but your "residency" (for citizenship purposes) may have started the first day you set foot on Argentine soil.

The five year waiting period was based on an "obsolete" requirement of three years of temporary residency followed by two years of permanent residency, but as long as you have permanent residency there really isn't any pressure for you to become a citizen.

Well, at least not yet.


PS: As soon as you have your DNI you can go to the federal court that has jurisdiction where you are living and ask when they'll accept your application for citizenship to start the process and what documentation is required.
Only thing I am curious about it seems DNU 70/2017 could allow for revocation of residency and deportation for minor legal issues. Suppose you had to violently defend yourself from some criminals and we know how that can go or could before perhaps. As much crime as I have seen around here it makes me wonder.
 
Only thing I am curious about it seems DNU 70/2017 could allow for revocation of residency and deportation for minor legal issues. Suppose you had to violently defend yourself from some criminals and we know how that can go or could before perhaps. As much crime as I have seen around here it makes me wonder.
me as well.
 
Citizenship Price List
http://


[background=transparent]Notes:[/background]​
[background=transparent]1. Satisfying ONE (1) of the 3 options (Buy Property [/background][background=transparent]OR [/background][background=transparent]Invest in Business [/background][background=transparent]OR [/background][background=transparent]Donation) gets you immediate [/background][background=transparent]Residency. [/background]
[background=transparent]2. Residency in any single EU country = a permit to live and work in ALL EU countries.[/background]
[background=transparent]3. Unspecified value in the (Invest in Business) implies that it is the same value as (Buy Property)[/background]
[background=transparent]4. Unspecified value in (Donation) implies program NOT available.[/background]
5[background=transparent]. Now you must agree that Paraguay is such an [/background]EXEPTIONALLY UNMATCHED GRAND BARGAIN !!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Only thing I am curious about it seems DNU 70/2017 could allow for revocation of residency and deportation for minor legal issues. Suppose you had to violently defend yourself from some criminals and we know how that can go or could before perhaps. As much crime as I have seen around here it makes me wonder.
Perhaps you are referring to mc kenna's story of being "bumped" from behind by another vehicle in the night, trying rolling his truck, while trying to flee, and then brandishing his gun when confronted by the other driver, something that most of us would consider a reasonable action. If I remember correctly, he was the one who got into trouble and "sentenced" to a period of probation. I wonder if that happened today if he would be subject to deportation, even though it happened before the decree, or even if he could now be subject to deportation as a result.

I am not an expert on the matter, but I think mc kenna's "miscalculation" may have been that he had the "right to "brandish" his gun and possibly point it at someone he considered a threat. Apparently the judge didn't see it that way. Even if one likes to project the image of a "cowboy" (or an actor who has played that role in movies) Argentina isn't the American Wild West and actions that would be "acceptable (if not admirable) in a movie simply aren't acceptable here (and perhaps not in the USA, either, at least in some cases).

Read what happened to mc kenna here: Here's A Little Story...

As far as having to actually "violently defend yourself from a criminal" leading to legal action against the individual who has to defend himself in order to save his own life, I can only speak from personal experience. II's OK to do so. The Argentine police were 100% on my side for the beginning and the perp (with a long previous criminal record by the age of 20) is now serving three years in jail.