Is Western Union asking non-residents for a CDI now?

SecretShopper

Registered
If you are entering Argentina as a tourist (from a "visa free" country) please keep in mind that entry permit is for 90 days and can be renewed once at for an additional 90 days at the office of migraciones. You can stretch your stay for the 6.5 months that you indicated (or even longer) if you visit a neighboring country while your 90 day entry permit is still valid. You will get a new 90 day entry permit when you reenter and you should be able to extend that by 90 days at the office of migraciones.

You can only get one extension and you should not leave and reenter while the extension is in effect. Border agents cannot "override" the extension and will not give you a new 90 day permit if you return before the "prorroga de permanencia" (extension of stay) expires.

PS: Always count the exact number of days when calculating your departure deadline. It's easy to overstay an entry permit by considering it good for three months. An overstay is not a big deal, but there is a fee/fine (I beleive presently $4500 pesos) that is charged for an overstay of even a single day..
I have citizenship ambitions so I'll be coming in with a student visa. I'm already accepted and enrolled and approved by the Ministerio de Educación for a 3.5 year program. I have all the needed paperwork for the visa but right now the consulado isn't processing them. So I'm just on the waiting game.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Searching the forum for previous posts about AFIP going after individuals who are condisered tax residents, including foreigners who have been in the country for more than a year who havereceived in Argentina more than the amount of ARS which is exempt from Argentine income tax, and have not made the appropriate declaration, I wonder if the request by Western Union for a CDI to complete future transfers has anything to do with the implementation of this:

 
Searching the forum for previous posts about AFIP going after individuals who are condisered tax residents, including foreigners who have been in the country for more than a year who havereceived in Argentina more than the amount of ARS which is exempt from Argentine income tax, and have not made the appropriate declaration, I wonder if the request by Western Union for a CDI to complete future transfers has anything to do with the implementation of this:

AFIP will just drive more people underground. ie EFECTIVO
 

steveinbsas

Registered
AFIP will just drive more people underground. ie EFECTIVO
If you know any way to go completley "underground" when sending money to a foreigner without in Argentina (or by a foreigner to him/hherself) from outside of the country, please share it here.

The only ways I know of for a foreigner without a CUIL or CUIT or CDI to get efectivo in Argentina from a US bank account are to...

1. use an ATM in Argentina (obviously, not desirable).

2: Transfer funds using a service like transferwise, XOOM, and Western Union using a passport number as an ID (at least still possible for some if not most foreigners without a CUIL, CUIT, or CDI).

3: Transfer funds from their US bank account to another person's bank account in the US and then get the pesos handed to them in Argentina by the person (or the agent of the person) they sent the dollars to in the US.

Option number three (IMO) is easier said than done..and still leaves a paper trail for the tax authorities in at least one of the countries to follow.

It actually might raise suspicions of money laundering, which I beleive is also consdiered a form tax evasion (though I don't know if regular deposits in the US bankholder's account of about $1500 USD per month would raise any red flags). I do know that US banks are required to report any "suspicious" activities.
 
Last edited:

steveinbsas

Registered
If you know any way to go completley "underground" when sending money to a foreigner without in Argentina (or by a foreigner to him/hherself) from outside of the country, please share it here.
Should be:

If you know any way to go completley "underground" when sending money to a foreigner in Argentina (or by a foreigner who is sending money to him/herself while they are here), please share it here.
 

Alpinista

Registered
Should be:

If you know any way to go completley "underground" when sending money to a foreigner in Argentina (or by a foreigner who is sending money to him/herself while they are here), please share it here.
Please refer to my post #14. I know at least two guys / institutions where you can send money to a US bank account and pick up the cash here (either in USD or in pesos). Obviously this goes with a commission (for a USD cash pick up I pay roughly 3%). And it also goes without saying that this involves a lot of trust. And furthermore I am not sure how you would do this outside CABA / Gran BsAs (I understand you live in a remote place).
 

SecretShopper

Registered
If you know any way to go completley "underground" when sending money to a foreigner without in Argentina (or by a foreigner to him/hherself) from outside of the country, please share it here.

The only ways I know of for a foreigner without a CUIL or CUIT or CDI to get efectivo in Argentina from a US bank account are to...

1. use an ATM in Argentina (obviously, not desirable).

2: Transfer funds using a service like transferwise, XOOM, and Western Union using a passport number as an ID (at least still possible for some if not most foreigners without a CUIL, CUIT, or CDI).

3: Transfer funds from their US bank account to another person's bank account in the US and then get the pesos handed to them in Argentina by the person (or the agent of the person) they sent the dollars to in the US.

Option number three (IMO) is easier said than done..and still leaves a paper trail for the tax authorities in at least one of the countries to follow.

It actually might raise suspicions of money laundering, which I beleive is also consdiered a form tax evasion (though I don't know if regular deposits in the US bankholder's account of about $1500 USD per month would raise any red flags). I do know that US banks are required to report any "suspicious" activities.
Another way would be to just physically bring in dollars while flying in. When you sell dollars I'm Argentina does that leave an official paper trail for AFIP?
 

Alpinista

Registered
Another way would be to just physically bring in dollars while flying in. When you sell dollars I'm Argentina does that leave an official paper trail for AFIP?
1) there are people living here for years without going to the US (especially now with Covid). But otherwise that is certainly a good option. However: if you come here with USD 10k it can also be a bit of an issue where to store so much cash. Especially as a first timer (then I would rather go with the WU option as you don't have a risk of getting your USD 10k getting stolen)
2) If you change your USD in a cueva (at the blue), there is obviously no paper trail (in theory it is illegal)
 
If you know any way to go completley "underground" when sending money to a foreigner without in Argentina (or by a foreigner to him/hherself) from outside of the country, please share it here.

The only ways I know of for a foreigner without a CUIL or CUIT or CDI to get efectivo in Argentina from a US bank account are to...

1. use an ATM in Argentina (obviously, not desirable).

2: Transfer funds using a service like transferwise, XOOM, and Western Union using a passport number as an ID (at least still possible for some if not most foreigners without a CUIL, CUIT, or CDI).

3: Transfer funds from their US bank account to another person's bank account in the US and then get the pesos handed to them in Argentina by the person (or the agent of the person) they sent the dollars to in the US.

Option number three (IMO) is easier said than done..and still leaves a paper trail for the tax authorities in at least one of the countries to follow.

It actually might raise suspicions of money laundering, which I beleive is also consdiered a form tax evasion (though I don't know if regular deposits in the US bankholder's account of about $1500 USD per month would raise any red flags). I do know that US banks are required to report any "suspicious" activities.
There is actually a fourth way ... and I have used it in the past: (it is similar, yet different than your point #3.)

Mind you, trust is involved and it is best to know your counterpart fairly well, or at least the counterpart should come highly recommended from any other intermediary party.

Regardless of wether the transaction takes place in Argentina or outside of it, simply use your credit card to buy something on behalf of the other person in exchange for them giving you cash. Inside of Argentina, it won't be at the blue, but it will get the job done if you can get past that. And if the person has family somewhere else and they are trying to help them, it is just as easy to make a purchase in another country and ship the goods within the country of purchase. Again, being compensated by the person getting the favor on behalf of their loved one.

It all boils down to this:

You spend on your credit card for someone and they give you the cash to reimburse you.

The downside is working at the official rate, but it, as I already stated, will get the job done.
 

Wade K.

Registered
Searching the forum for previous posts about AFIP going after individuals who are condisered tax residents, including foreigners who have been in the country for more than a year who havereceived in Argentina more than the amount of ARS which is exempt from Argentine income tax, and have not made the appropriate declaration, I wonder if the request by Western Union for a CDI to complete future transfers has anything to do with the implementation of this:

Do you know what the limit is you can receive without incurring tax? And if one did do a border run after being here 90 days, then got an extension for another 90 days, and spent the remaining 95 days or so out of the country, would that keep the government happy with him as far as residency and taxes go? Or can one just overstay, pay the fine, and no one really cares? I'd just as soon stay a couple of years, pay the fine as I fly to the States to see family, then return and repeat as long as that's not going to get me booted. And probably most months not send myself more than $500 USD.
 
Top