Jobs for people staying 2 plus years

BlahBlah

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1: Someone who has an income from there homecountry, they retire or do a job for fun or voluntary work. There are some, but very few

2: Someone who works over the internet. Some but again few

3: Teaching english, i doubt that many make it to 2 years

4: People who were send abroad by there company, again very few

5: People who live together with a partner, they have a small job and keep afloat

6: People who work 4 to 6 months a year in there homecountry and then come back

7: Someone who bought a few appartements and rents them out and lives in one

8: Someone who started a business, restaurant, bar of outsourcing company

Are there any more options to stay 2 plus years?
 

jp

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Really depends on what skills people have. There's work about for people who have valuable skills, their papers in order and good spanish.
 

BlahBlah

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jp said:
Really depends on what skills people have. There's work about for people who have valuable skills, their papers in order and good spanish.
So that would make 9 then

9: People who come here as a profesional and are making enough to stay 2 plus years

Do you really think you can make enough to stay working an Argentine job?
 

criswkh

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I came here with a master in science plus a teaching degree, got a job at a private college. I made a local salary of $4,000 pesos a month, of course I got the extra 13th salary. That salary along with living with a roommate or lover could keep you for awhile. As long as you budget.
 

mini

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BlahBlah said:
So that would make 9 then

9: People who come here as a profesional and are making enough to stay 2 plus years

Do you really think you can make enough to stay working an Argentine job?
I know some extranjeros who are working local Argentine jobs & make enough to live here for 2 years or so assuming inflation doesn't go gaga crazy or barring some other type of economic or political kaboom.
 

BlahBlah

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mini said:
I know some extranjeros who are working local Argentine jobs & make enough to live here for 2 years or so assuming inflation doesn't go gaga crazy or barring some other type of economic or political kaboom.
What kind of jobs do they have?

Personally I can't imagine myself wanting to live in BA if I have to work 40 to 60 hours a week and earning a local salary. Not even if I live together with a lover

Maybe for a year but not for 2 plus years. I also wonder what it would do to your resume
 

Bairesgirl

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Actually my two cents sorry if it doesn´t help:

I would say most of the expats in Argentina long-term or at least medium term-2 years- are comprised in these six categories you stated:

1: Someone who has an income from there homecountry, they retire or do a job for fun or voluntary work. (Retired- many of those)

2: Someone who works over the internet. (Met quite a few))

3: Teaching english, i doubt that many make it to 2 years (still a lot of people try)

4: People who were send abroad by there company, again very few (actually traditional expats are those sent here by embassies, multinationals, international organisations- there a whoole bunch of those)

5: People who live together with a partner, they have a small job and keep afloat
(I meet a lot of expats married to argentines or other expats, etc..)

8: Someone who started a business, restaurant, bar of outsourcing company (a bunch of those: particularly in the restaurant/bar business........ a lot of the indian rest., thai rest (empire thai), also bars like Casa Bar, rets. like California Burrito Company, Pura vida juice bar, businesses like Sugar & Spice the cookie factory which has been very succesful.-... I see those cookies and biscotti everywhere etc many restaurants particularly those that are ethnic or offer something a little bit different in this city are owned by expats) Also the Curves company is owned by an expat... there a few spas owned by expats, etc....

Blah Blah what is your academic/work experience background?
What is your field of expertise?

best,

V.
 

mini

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BlahBlah said:
What kind of jobs do they have?

Personally I can't imagine myself wanting to live in BA if I have to work 40 to 60 hours a week and earning a local salary. Not even if I live together with a lover

Maybe for a year but not for 2 plus years. I also wonder what it would do to your resume
They work for international companies in various jobs. The ones who's jobs I know include: IT, HR, management, new technologies, marketing. Regular jobs like you have in other countries.

I would imagine it would depends on the job, no? If you love your job, get along well with your colleagues & the pay allows you a good standard of living than what's the problem? If you can choose your city & you can leave when you want/find another job in another city, I'd imagine that's a good thing. It's a great experience for a couple of years. If you hate your job it doesn't matter where you are living.

You won't find me working 40-60 hours in an office but the country I live in is not relevant in that regard.
 

jp

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BlahBlah said:
Do you really think you can make enough to stay working an Argentine job?
Yup.
I've been here a year and half, working an argentine job, earning pesos.
Life's good.

What does is it do for your resume?
Well that all depends on what you are doing and who you are doing it for.
 

erindanelle

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I'm also working an Argentine job and earning pesos. 9 - 6 monday to friday, I don't think that is too excessive. I'll admit i'm fairly tired come Friday, but i'm far from working like a slave.

I actually anticipate that it will greatly help my resume. I got this job as I had sales experience and am a native English speaker. However my sales experience is in an industry completely different to the one i'm in now, and I had to learn a huge amount.
I have looked online and I know that this job I have now would earn me double what I ever earned as a sales manager in my last industry in Australia.
However I would never have gotten an opportunity to start in this industry at home without any knowledge of it. Here I had the advantage of having native English which was a necessity for the position.
I think if I get 2-3 years experience here I will be setting myself up for something much better than I would have had back home.

I live with my partner and our household income is not very high, i'd put it at 5000 pesos a month, and we live quite comfortably and very happily despite the fact I send money home every month to cover my loan installments with my Australian bank.
 
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