Know a wedding planner?

#1
Hi, I currently live in NYC with my Argentine financee. We are getting married in San Isidro, Argentina in April 2008. I am in need of a wedding planner who can help us arrange all the details such as flowers, food, photographers, etc. Any recommendations of people or websites would be quite helpful. I need someone who speaks both english and spanish.
Thank you,
Linden
 
#2
I just got married in Buenos Aires this past January and we didn't use a wedding planner. In my opinion, it's not necessary....even if you're up in NYC. If you get the caterer down, they usually have connections for photographers, cake people, flowers, dj, etc. And sometimes these services are already included in the price. I can give you names of the people that we used if you're interested, just send me a note. Congratulations!
 
#3
Dear Linden,
please forgive my mail but just want to whisper in your ear:
Have you checked out your marital rights here in Argentina as far as property etc?
If you have not drop me a mail and I will fill you in.
If you marry here and live in a property that belongs to your fiance you will have no rights to a part of that property in case of divorce. Even if you invest money in that property. You will also not have automatic rights of stay in that property if your fiance/dies and has children from a previous marriage.
Also if your children are born here within an Argentine marriage you will have to get formal permission every time you travel outside of the Argentine territory from your husband and documented by a public notary.
That will not apply if your babies are born in the US and the marriage is US. US law will protect you in case of dispute.

This mail is not meant to take the steam out of your wedding on the contrary it is to make sure your ass is covered for the future.
I have been through two major international custody battles for children from two mariages. This is my third marriage and I like to think that finally I am streetwise
I am married to an Argentine national and I married in the UK.
I have a girlfrind from California who was planning to marry here and I filled her in, took her to a local lawyer and now she has changed venue. As we never know what the future holds for us.
I know you may be shocked by this mail. But as foreigners and women we all have to look out for each other an being informed can at least take the sting out of any future dispute.
Chinese Proverb: "When someone shares something of
value with you and you benefit from it, You have a
moral obligation to share it with others."
Good luck with everything and mail me if you need any info
auntieapple@cosefa.com.ar
regards

Laurence
 
#4
Actually Canada (and the US and many other nations) have laws regarding needing signed and notarized documents from the parents in order to take children under the age of 13 (and in some countries, 18) out of the country of residency. This is to stop child abduction. I think this is perfectly sane - perhaps you feel it would limit your ability to take your children out of Argentina, but it thankfully also limits the possibility of the father/mother of your child abducting them out of this country or another.
 
#5
I agree with Sheridan725. I got married here last November and everything was very easy. I can´t think of any names right now, but the place you decide to have the all night crazy drunk fest party that follows any Argentinean wedding should be able to help with everything.
PS I´m not complaining about the party. It´s tons of fun.
 
#6
"syngirl" said:
Actually Canada (and the US and many other nations) have laws regarding needing signed and notarized documents from the parents in order to take children under the age of 13 (and in some countries, 18) out of the country of residency. This is to stop child abduction. I think this is perfectly sane - perhaps you feel it would limit your ability to take your children out of Argentina, but it thankfully also limits the possibility of the father/mother of your child abducting them out of this country or another.
I think you should look into a treaty that is called something like Anti-child abduction. If I am correctly you cant take your kid to your home country without the consent of the other parent.

Having kids from a different nationality then your residence helps you to get out of the country because they can travel on that travel document but in the long run I think kids needs to be returned to the country of residence. If your kid is in your home country you play for your home court offcourse but any parent who takes his kid without consent of the other parent can burn in hell as far as I am concerned
 
#7
I agree with you syngirl, but I am talking about even taking your children across the border on holiday. You can not make any spur of the moment trips without going to a notary to make a formal declaration.
I am very anti child abduction but when you are a mother, living abroad and you have a dispute with a husband or partner and are subject to any abuse by that partner your obvious response is to pack up your children and go home.
You can not do that In Argentina. If I travel out of argentina with my child that was born here I have to go to a public Notary and get a formal document signed by my husband giving consent.
When my last child was born here, my husband left after 10 days to go to work in europe. I had had major surgery and was only fit to register baby after my husband had left. When I went to register, they asked me where my husband was. I explained he was in Europe and that I would be flying to join him in the next few weeks. Well they refused to allow the baby to be registered without the presence of my husband. As a knock on affect I was declined a passport as you have to register baby in order to get a passport/dni/cedula. In the meantime I went to the british embassy and within 5 days was issued with my childs British passport. That sounds fine but a child born here is not allowed to leave the country on his foreign passport. So I had to remain in Argentina for five months until my husband could come back to complete the registration.
I do not know if you have children syngirl but the bigest violation to a mother is someone telling you when and where you can take your children. I as I repeat have been in that situation twice and only when you have been there do you realise the violation that is.
Also I go back to rights in marriage and property here and really it is the pits for women. Especially second wives.
So I would advise any girl from abroad to marry your Argentine prince elswhere. Preferably in your own home jurisdiction. Or make sure you know the law here and truly understand it.
 
#8
"auntieapple" said:
I am very anti child abduction but when you are a mother, living abroad and you have a dispute with a husband or partner and are subject to any abuse by that partner your obvious response is to pack up your children and go home.
You can go to the police. And if you do that you can burn in hell as far as I am concerned
And your former husband left after you had gotten a baby 10 days earlier and were still in hospital.
That sums it up what kind of person he was. Take as the exception and not as the rule

 
#9
Well the rules vis-a-vis traveling with children are very similar in Canada now. Actually I think this year quite a few countries have passed laws.
Even if my sister-in-law wants to drive down to Bellingham (30mins from Vancouver, Canada) she needs notarized authorization from my brother.
When they went to Holland together last year, she stayed on later than he did. They didn't even think of papers, she was going back to Canada, why would they need papers to take him back into Canada? Well she arrived at the airport and they refused to let her onto the plane until she could produce an authorized notice from my brother that she was allowed to travel -- even though she was on her way home! So obviously she missed the flight, they had a whole commotion of back and forth to lawyers etc before she was allowed to bring him back into the country.
I think the key difference to Argentina is that Holland and Canada allowed all of this to be processed via fax and couriering of documents.
If someone exits a country with their children and without knowledge of the other parent -- even if it is with intention of being out of the country for only a few days -- they may find themselves in the position of being wanted for child abduction. And if one find themselves in that position, they might as well wave goodbye to getting custody rights after a divorce.
I'm sorry, I don't agree with the above poster's comment (burn in...) because obviously in some situations we are not thinking straight. As you yourself said, until you're in that situation you can't understand.
However, if anyone wants out of a situation and they've got kids, they need to follow all the laws of the country you're living in or they may be forced to give up their rights to their kids entirely.
 
#10
granadaiscool, why are you so angry? And you do not even know auntieapple personally to make comments/ attacks like that. The lady expressed her own experience and yet you attack her very person by saying negative things about her.