Living in Buenos Aires

Granadaiscool

Registered
[snipped] Everyone in Argentina needs to provide an home adress when money is changed.
It´s the law
Just like there are anti-abduction laws
 
E

Ernie

Guest
Granadaiscool (but you're not),
I find your behaviour to be appalling. You have the manners of an orangutan. If you MUST argue with other members of this forum, kindly do it privately. And please, try to do it in English. Every time you post a comment, we have to guess what you mean through an ocean of bad grammar, first grade-like syntax, and laughable spelling.
Lastly, locals and tourists are not subject to the same exchange regulations. Get it through your head.
Ernie
 

Elpanada

Registered
Selective criticism You criticize his few small remarks but when others say really nasty shit you remain silent.Then you attack the man for his decent English, I am terribly sorry but not all of us went to oxford. That does however not make us any worse people and chumps have no business throwing that in our face as if it is something to be ashamed of. I recall granada stating he's from Holland which must mean he's a native dutch speaker, that's three languages he has in his bag, not an easy load to carry around.Lastly nobody is subject to any regulations when it comes to exchanging currency in Argentina unless they ofcourse subject themselves to it cause there are many honorable places that don't ask for identification from anyone.
 

Bill

Registered
The question is... what are the reasons you live in Buenos Aires (BA)?
For myself, I travelled through Central and South America with BA as my destination. I didn't come here to work but to explore and learn. I'd been studying various countries with basic ideals in mind. I made a list of 10 different locations and CHOSE to come here. I should also mention that I no longer live in BA and that Argentina and BA are two different subjects. I should also mention that I love Argentina and even BA, so please don't get the idea that every ex-pat hates this place. Most of my complaints are said with a smile and laugh.
Back to the question....
  • Economics. I like the idea of earning wealth in my home country and spending it in another country so that its value increases. I was also interested in the economic history of Argentina and learning what went wrong and how the people here were dealing with it. BA used to be one of the most expensive cities in the world and is now very affordable (for now).
  • Location. BA is a major hub in the South American transport system and the "center" of Argentina. Need to get out of the country to renew your visa? It's easy here.
  • BA is one of the great world cities. EVERY person I talked to about this city before I came here was interested in either coming here or hearing about my adventures. It's world famous.
  • Cities within a city. A country within a country. BA is it's own world in a way you can't understand until you live here. To say it's BIG is an understatment. It's overwhelming.
  • It's different. A different hemisphere, people, language, culture etc... I was looking for a radical change and to experience life here as a resident rather than a tourist.
  • The people and culture. Portenos are a breed unto themselves even within Argentina and especially, Latin America. For better or worse, they are unique. The standard joke is that Argentines commit suicide by jumping off the top of their ego.
  • The women. Porteno women are beautiful and complicated. I could write a book and at the end admit I still don't understand them at all.
  • The speed of life. BA is crazy and out of control and I love to walk the streets to drink it in. Paris and Madrid mixed with London and America.
  • You can find almost anything here. Look around enough and it's amazing what you can find. Even Peanut butter or eggs for breakfast.
 

Granadaiscool

Registered
"Ernie" said:
Granadaiscool (but you're not),
I find your behaviour to be appalling. You have the manners of an orangutan. If you MUST argue with other members of this forum, kindly do it privately. And please, try to do it in English. Every time you post a comment, we have to guess what you mean through an ocean of bad grammar, first grade-like syntax, and laughable spelling.
Blah
Lastly, locals and tourists are not subject to the same exchange regulations. Get it through your head.
Become a local or go somewhere else. Problem solved. See ya
Ernie
 

Granadaiscool

Registered
"Elpanada" said:
Lastly nobody is subject to any regulations when it comes to exchanging currency in Argentina unless they ofcourse subject themselves to it cause there are many honorable places that don't ask for identification from anyone.
Any bank needs to do it. It´s the law. Don´t exchange money or comply to the law.
You can offcourse go to Florida and exchange it on the street.


 

Elpanada

Registered
Nice reply but sbout BA being one of the great world cities and an overwhelming one, I sorta wholeheartedly disagree sure it is sorta big or well it's
203 km² (78.5 sq mi) which isn't that big really but great world city, overwhelming that just doesn't sound like the city I know.
 

sergio

Registered
I agree that some of the posts here can be petty, though not all. Someone commented that he would like to see a post from someone who went to a concert and enjoyed it. This is interesting because last year (I am not sure if the policy continues) the Teatro Colon charged DOUBLE the normal price for tickets to the operas. Tickets are normally expensive but when doubled they went as high as 1,000 pesos (Grand Abono performances) for non resident people - you need a DNI to prove residence. I think this is the sort of behavior here (and keep in mind that the Teatro Colon is municipally owned and heavily subsidized) that infuriates people. It simply isn't done in other countries and it is wrong, be it here in Argentina or anywhere else in the world. Someone else said "become a local". That is probably a good idea if you want to avoid some of these inconveniences but still there remains the problems of businesses that want to charge more to someone who has an accent. This can happen in other countries but probably more in Latin America than Europe or North America.
 

syngirl

Registered
Sergio is right about the Opera tickets -- I think it was 400 pesos for a DNI holder in 2006 and double for a foreigner (oh and those were for the chicken seats).
On the other hand I suppose opera fans would think that this is reasonable for one of the top houses in the world. For my 25th birthday years ago my uncle took me to Covent Garden -- our tickets were 275 pounds each -- which I believe is something like 1600 or 1750 pesos. The acoustics for each theatre are supposed to be on par, and the costumes for each are shared (Opera Houses keep their costumes for years and run an exchange programme). So I suppose going to the same opera here may be considered a bargain??
However, now that the Colon is closed for renovation, I wonder if they are getting away with charging high prices at Luna Park -- obviously part of your ticket price is for the experience of being at the Colon -- who wants to pay extra to go to Luna Park??
I'm sure when the Colon reopens for the bicentennial the prices will be through the roof -- on par with La Scala and Covent Garden.
 

Granadaiscool

Registered
"sergio" said:
I agree that some of the posts here can be petty, though not all. Someone commented that he would like to see a post from someone who went to a concert and enjoyed it. This is interesting because last year (I am not sure if the policy continues) the Teatro Colon charged DOUBLE the normal price for tickets to the operas. Tickets are normally expensive but when doubled they went as high as 1,000 pesos (Grand Abono performances) for non resident people - you need a DNI to prove residence. I think this is the sort of behavior here (and keep in mind that the Teatro Colon is municipally owned and heavily subsidized) that infuriates people. It simply isn't done in other countries and it is wrong, be it here in Argentina or anywhere else in the world. Someone else said "become a local". That is probably a good idea if you want to avoid some of these inconveniences but still there remains the problems of businesses that want to charge more to someone who has an accent. This can happen in other countries but probably more in Latin America than Europe or North America.
Seems fair that the ones who pay for the subsidies also are the ones who profit from it.
You and you are responsible for what you pay. If they want to charge you more, don't pay

 
Top