moving to Buenos Aires

#1
I am a recent college graduate planning on moving to Argentina in September, but I have to be honest: I have read many of your posts on these forums and they are beginning to scare me!many of you complain about high prices and being ripped off, so i am wondering what advice you would give a young American (with not a lot of money). also, I am planning on teaching english as a foreign language. can anyone give me an recommendations about this. I am planning on getting certified either by EBC or TEFL-International. does anyone know anything about this?
Please let me know if you have ANY advice or suggestions (or warnings for me!)Thank you,Sabina
 
#2
"sabinabina" said:
I am a recent college graduate planning on moving to Argentina in September, but I have to be honest: I have read many of your posts on these forums and they are beginning to scare me!many of you complain about high prices and being ripped off, so i am wondering what advice you would give a young American (with not a lot of money). also, I am planning on teaching english as a foreign language. can anyone give me an recommendations about this. I am planning on getting certified either by EBC or TEFL-International. does anyone know anything about this?
Please let me know if you have ANY advice or suggestions (or warnings for me!)Thank you,Sabina 
Find out for yourself if you are willing to live on long working hours, little fun and little money to spend.
 
#3
There's so many Americans with little to no experience showing up these days -- is there a big ad campaign going on there or something? You are not only competing with Argentines, you're competing with all your fellow countrymen for the jobs that are out there. Wages are low and locals live at home until they're 30 for a reason.
With so much competition you are going to find it really tough to get decent money flowing in -- try and find the suitcaseonwheels blog and you can read his experience.
Teaching in September... well you have to remember that summer holidays start in end December - and go until beginning of March, so it's going to be dead. You'll have a couple of months to make some cash before everyone beats it to the beach...
If your Spanish is really good maybe you'll be able to find work with a tour company? liasoning with foreigners and the locals...? Call centers maybe? Hostels?
You're probably going to need another job for back up other than just teaching. Many teachers only get paid for the hours that they are teaching, not their travel time -- so 10 hours out of the house, but only 5 teaching, -50% of your wage to the agency = muy poco plata para vos...
Bottom line: come with money to back you up. If you come with money and an uncrushable spirit, you'll be fine.