Now Police Can Ask You For The Dni You Don't Have

Pensador

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I think Argentina, Argentinians and the justice system have come a long way since the days of the military governments. Also police harassment makes news fast these days with social media. Given what I believe are Macri's objectives of normalizing things in Argentine and transforming the country into a globally competitive player beyond the limitations of the agricultural sector. I really do not believe anything is going to come of this and if it was to become something or start manifesting as harassment or abuse I believe he would do something about it. He seems to me to be interested in demonstrating that he is a capable president and that Argentina can be more than the political nut house it has been for so many years. So until we see evidence that this is in fact resulting in any form of abuse I believe it is best to stay calm and carry on. Nothing can be done about it as far as we are concerned anyway.
 

Noesdeayer

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Pensador:
A very complete and "thought out" (no pun intended) opinion on Argentine Justice's last 33 years .
.Together with a compliment from Bajo_cero2. WOW ! That's not esay to get
If anyone is interested in a further in depth analysis and comparision of Argentina's and Brazil's present Justice systems
Please read, "South America's Culture of Graft" by Uki Goñi in the Opinion Pages of The New York Times ,December 30,'15.
Simply Google: Uki Goñi and you'll find the article there.
Argentina has come a long way since their Military Gov't. but Brazil has come a lot farther and better.
 

nicoenarg

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Yet another issue blown out of proportion because Macri!!!

http://www.lanacion....un-acto-fundado

"Tras el aval de la Corte de la Ciudad para que la Policía pida documentos a las personas sin motivo alguno de sospecha, el ministro de Justicia y Seguridad porteño, Martín Ocampo , destacó hoy en declaraciones radiales que la ley habilita que los agentes soliciten el documento "pero no de cualquier manera". "Tiene que existir un acto fundado que valide la intervención. No es por portación de cara"."
 

jp

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So until we see evidence that this is in fact resulting in any form of abuse I believe it is best to stay calm and carry on. Nothing can be done about it as far as we are concerned anyway.
This is true.

But remaining vigilant isn't unreasonable. The security services have a well documented history of incompetence, overreach, corruption, torture and murder.

It's public knowledge that a large number of military personnel transitioned to the security services during the post dictatorship years. Also no secret that many rose through the ranks, and oversaw the training and development of a new generation of security personnel.

Institutional memory is an issue for security services the world over. I don't blame anyone for being thoroughly alarmed by this development.

Hope for the best, prepare for the worst. Not a bad mantra to live by in Argentina.
 

Noesdeayer

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JP:
I totally agree with everything you say except," I don't blame anyone for being thoroughly alarmed by this development".
a) Definition of "alarmed"-----------" to make fearful or apprehensive ,distressed".
"Remaining vigilant isn't unreasonable". Absolutely true.
B) Definition of "vigilant"------------" keeny watchful to detect danger,wary".
In my view the present situation calls more for vigilance than for alarm.
With vigilance you can keep a cooler head and,maybe,make better decisions.
 

Bajo_cero2

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Since I came back from vacation I realize that the common police men were replaced by anti protest heavy infantery. They are not nice at all.
 
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