Orange Marmalade

Redpossum

Registered
Interesting recipe, but I've never made marmalade before, and I encounter two things I don't understand

Place the jars in the oven. Bring the marmalade to a rolling boil and start to test after five minutes.
Once setting point is reached, remove the pan from the heat, and allow to cool for about ten minutes.
"test" how, and for what?
What is meant by "setting point" ?
 

elhombresinnombre

Registered
Interesting recipe, but I've never made marmalade before, and I encounter two things I don't understand



"test" how, and for what?
What is meant by "setting point" ?
I am not @joelie but you "test" the jam or marmalade until you find it has reached the "setting point."

There are other methods but I use a dinner plate which I keep chilled in the fridge. When the hot stuff looks as if it might be setting (difficult if you've not done it before, I know) or feels different whilst stirring, drop a tiny amount of the jam on the edge of the plate and leave it about 30 seconds. If it runs away when you tilt the plate it's not ready yet - keep stirring. When it reaches the point where not only doesn't it run away but a gentle touch makes the surface wrinkle, it's done. Time to put it in jars.

@joelie I enjoy the lavender & lovage blog too. I regularly make their Old Fashioned Milk Loaf and - I'm not showing off or anything* - but I have two authentic Mermaid Australian Milk Loaf tins: one I use in England and the other in BsAs.

*OK yes, I am showing off
 

chris

Registered
I find the problem is the very high % of sugar in marmalade made in Argentina. I like thick cut, bitter orange marmalade which you can't find anywhere in Argentina.
 

Redpossum

Registered
I find the problem is the very high % of sugar in marmalade made in Argentina. I like thick cut, bitter orange marmalade which you can't find anywhere in Argentina.
It has been my observation that Argentinos have a major league sweet tooth. They will put sugar or that accursed dulce de leche in everything. I am the opposite; I don't even keep any sugar in the house.

However, that being said, have you actually tried the orange marmalade I recommended in the post which began this thread? It's not UK quality, but compared to the average Argentine marmalade, it is very good, in my opinion. It's only about 200 pesos at my local Carrefour Express.
 

elhombresinnombre

Registered
(To find fruit trees on public space in your area, check out the following map: https://www.arboladourbano.com/)
Forgive me if I'm missing something that's obvious to everybody else, but how do you distinguish between trees where you can help yourself and trees where you can't?

For example, on the map I found the tree outside Abuelito's house, and I remember that we were there at the time the surveyors came, photographed and catalogued it. But I would have said that it was Abuelito's tree: the title deeds mark the house plot right down to the roadside kerb (the reason, I understand, why homeowners are responsible for the pavements outside their home). The tree was planted by the family in front of the house in an elevated bed surrounded by a low brick wall and I have always thought of it as "our" tree on "our" land - and our responsibility to keep it tidy and clear the fallen leaves away. Is that really a public tree on public land?
 

elhombresinnombre

Registered
Just to follow up my last message, here's an example of what I mean by "our" tree https://tinyurl.com/27bnt9h6. This scene was taken at random in a random barrio (obviously there's not much point being called elhombresinnombre if you are going to post pictures of your own family house) but it is exactly the same type of situation. I'm genuinely interested in finding out how this works in Argentina because whilst I understand the common law on foraging in England and regularly harvest fruit there that's growing wild, I'd like to do the same in Buenos Aires if I can do it legally, responsibly and without upsetting anyone.
 
Top