Rentisa Visa Questions

#21
Is it always the case that they want to see 2 years, or only because I'm using savings / a bank fund rather than salary / a fixed source of income?
I believe so, but it's been a while since I read about this "requirement" and I don't have any current info one way or the other.

Hopefully, they won't ask you to have enough funds in the trust to make two years of distributions. At the current rate of $30,000 pesos/$700 USD pesos per month you would only need a little over $16,000 USD in the trust fund if they do.

if I started a business and the business was making $2k+ / month, around how many months would it have to continue making that amount in order for me to be able to use that for the Rentisa visa?
It doesn't work that way. The visa rentista is granted on the basis of stale/uninterruptible foreign income. You can't just come to Argentina and start a business without getting an investor visa...and that would require a much greater investment than the 40K USD that you have.
 
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#22
That's pretty expensive, I found a lot of apartments available for $300-400 a month on Airbnb which were furnished as well. Were you looking for particularly nice apartments only?
I was looking for apartments in Recoleta but one bedroom or studio. Nothing fancy but also, no sleeping on the couch or such. Just clean, simple spaces. I did find some at lower prices but not at $10 or $12/ night. Also one of the flaws of AirBnB I found was in the dates of availability. It got tricky when you got to the calendars of available dates and what you actually could rent.
 
#23
Just to note that all that 'ponderous' language and detail is absent from the Radex Pensioner application, including any advice that the docs need to be translated.
Does it say anything about foreign docs needing the Apostille?

Hopefully, it does and you were able to accomplish that.

At least getting the translation(s) in Argentina isn't terribly difficult...if that's any consolation...:rolleyes:
 
#24
I found a lot of apartments available for $300-400 a month on Airbnb which were furnished as well. Were you looking for particularly nice apartments only?
Where are these apartments located?

There may be a "not-so-good" reason they are so cheap.

PS: Hopefully, it's just because the owners are desperate for cash.
 
#25
Does it say anything about foreign docs needing the Apostille?
Hopefully, it does and you were able to accomplish that.
At least getting the translation(s) in Argentina isn't terribly difficult...if that's any consolation...:rolleyes:
That's the thing. No it doesn't mention that requirement of foreign doc apostille, except in the case of the foreign criminal report. In that case you're asked to upload pictures of the foreign criminal report and the Apostille of that report. Also, in the Radex app which I've now been through enough to see the ultimate page, it's not requesting proof of pensioner income (which I've read elsewhere does require Apostille and translation), there's no request for birth certificate and translation in Spanish. As soon as I can load the certificado de domicilio I'll be finished entering required information and can click "Finalizir". Then we'll see what comes...
 
#26
Where are these apartments located?
There may be a "not-so-good" reason they are so cheap.
PS: Hopefully, it's just because the owners are desperate for cash.
The ones I saw on AirBnB Recoleta, Buenos Aires were in the margins of Recoleta, and other side of Santa Fe. Then there were a couple of real estate offices with the listing in the window. One on Juncal near Callao, but I didn't chase them down yet, just window shopping so far. Currently I'm tucked into a short term rental on Las Heras, monoambiente, for USD700/mo. Until my shipment of personal effects arrives and I need a bigger place, and whatever final drama with Customs and the Despechante Aduana blows over.
 
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#27
(Radex) doesn't mention that requirement of foreign doc apostille, except in the case of the foreign criminal report. In that case you're asked to upload pictures of the foreign criminal report and the Apostille of that report..
But no translation? I hope that means it's no longer required, but I seriously doubt it.

Also, in the Radex app which I've now been through enough to see the ultimate page, it's not requesting proof of pensioner income (which I've read elsewhere does require Apostille and translation),.
No proof of income? I hope that means it's no longer required, but I seriously doubt it.

If it is required and your retirement income is US Social Security, at least you will be able to get a "monthly benefits letter" in Spanish at the US Embassy. It won't require translation or an Apostille, but it will have to be"legalized" in Argentina.

there's no request for birth certificate and translation in Spanish. As soon as I can load the certificado de domicilio I'll be finished entering required information and can click "Finalizir". Then we'll see what comes...
As far as I know, the birth certificate hasn't been required for a "number" of years.
 
#28
But no translation? I hope that means it's no longer required, but I seriously doubt it.
No proof of income? I hope that means it's no longer required, but I seriously doubt it.
If it is required and your retirement income is US Social Security, at least you will be able to get a "monthly benefits letter" in Spanish at the US Embassy. It won't require translation or an Apostille, but it will have to be"legalized" in Argentina.
As far as I know, the birth certificate hasn't been required for a "number" of years.
I agree with your doubts on these documentation aspects. It's the reason I've invoked the 'Damocles Sword' principle in my writings on the procedures of applying for residency. But regardless of what comes, at the least in the beginning of the application you're not tripped up with those translation and apostille requirements while you're filling out the application. If they make you fetch one or the other later, at least you've gotten the core of the application completed and it's waiting for additional materials to be supplied by you.
Regards Social Security, USA, thanks the tip on the monthly benefits letter in Spanish from the Embassy. Will get signed up there! Maybe that will suffice for proof of pension, translated.
Further on Social Security USA I discovered that the US Social Security now has a website and once you're enrolled you have access to all your annual earnings and payment in SS history in full detail; to all your monthly benefits history in detail; and an official letter that speaks in specifics to your benefits. All of it perfect if you need to document your proof of pension. Easy to print out and take to a translator. If Argentina requires an Apostille I guess from here you'd need to get an Apostille service to assist. Not sure how that works.
 
#29
Thank you for the help.

I have around $40k USD in savings. Even if we considered the requirement to be $2k USD rather than 30k pesos, I should be good in terms of the financial requirements, right? Or do I need to convert that into a bank trust? I really don't understand why that would be necessary if I have the savings in my own bank account?QUOTE]
My wife and I applied for a pensionado visa from the US at out city's Argentine consulate in 2016. While we were retired already, we were not receiving SS benefits and did not have pensions per se, just private retirement accounts. For that reason they said we would have to give us a rentista visa. They did not require that any part of that money be put in a trust. After our first year in Argentina, we switched to a pensioner's visa, because my wife had begun to receive SS. We did this from the US and everything could have changed since then, but I did want to share our experience.
 
#30
Regards Social Security, USA, thanks the tip on the monthly benefits letter in Spanish from the Embassy. Will get signed up there! Maybe that will suffice for proof of pension, translated.

Further on Social Security USA I discovered that the US Social Security now has a website and once you're enrolled you have access to...an official letter that speaks in specifics to your benefits. All of it perfect if you need to document your proof of pension. Easy to print out and take to a translator. If Argentina requires an Apostille I guess from here you'd need to get an Apostille service to assist. Not sure how that works.
Unless something has changed (recently) the official and original monthly benefits letter in Spanish that you can get at the US Embassy will not require either an Apostille or a translation. All you'll have to do is take it to an office in Retiro (on Aranales near the Plaza San Maritn) to be legalized while you wait (I hope). I think you have to make an appointment to get the letter from the SSA special services unit, but you may be able to pick it up at the embassy entrance without entering. I don't know if their is a charge for the letter.

If you wish, you can print out the letter in English on the SSA website, send it (perhaps electronically) to an Apostille service in the USA and they can get the Apostille for you. If you (eventually) need to have the original letter with the Apostille translated in Argentina, the Apostille service will have to send the hard copy to you here. Then you will have to take it to the translator and pay for the translation service as well as the legalization of the translation.

I'm fairly certain the cost of ding the latter will be far more expensive and time consuming than the former.
 
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