Retirement In BA

sergio

Registered
Be careful of International Living. They are extremely commercial, eager to sell their products and give a very rosy picture of the countries they promote.
 

TomAtAlki

Registered
Hi Choklit,

Lots of negativity on this site. My wife and I bought a place here about a year ago. After being here for 3 days we decided this was the place for us. It took a week to find what we wanted. We've been down 3 times since our purchase (from 2 weeks to 2 months) and have a hard time staying away but we are still working. Our plan is to retire here in a couple of years and be in AR 8 +/- months a year. And there is all of South America to explore. We love BA. The people, the food, music, prices, markets. Really no complaints. It is a big city but that is what we wanted. Retirement doesn't mean the quiet life in the country to us. I want excitement, cultural experiences, adventure. We'll be down the first half of June. If you're there drop us a note and we can meet. Or if you find your way to Seattle we're there too.
 

RWS

Registered
Quoting "sergio": "Be careful of International Living. They are extremely commercial, eager to sell their products and give a very rosy picture of the countries they promote."
I'm an American who's spent much of his life abroad (thanks to my father's occupation and, later, my own inclination). Out of curiosity, I've subscribed to "International Living" several times over the past quarter-century. I completely agree with Sergio: IL is not a reliable source of information (at the least, not for countries in which I've lived or travelled extensively).
 

Stanexpat

Registered
"Lots of negativity on this site. My wife and I bought a place here
about a year ago. After being here for 3 days we decided this was the
place for us. It took a week to find what we wanted. We've been down 3
times since our purchase (from 2 weeks to 2 months) and have a hard
time staying away but we are still working."Not to add more negativity but you really can't accurately judge B.A. or any other place after a couple of weeks or months for that matter. Until you actually lived someplace you are still just a tourist on an extended vacation.First impressions of B.A. are positive for most people. It's when you've been living here for a while dealing with the problems of daily life here that the problems become more apparent. There are pluses and minuses here just like anyplace else.In my opinion after living overseas for several years including two here there are better places to live and retire than B.A. Several of them are quite nearby. Again if you are dead set on coming here please rent first. Check out some of the other cities in Argentina and neighboring countries as well. I agree with the comments on IL not being a source of reliable information. I remember story I read where they were interviewing a lady that had lived in Ecuador. According to her she saw no problems with political stability in the country and that she believed it was a good place to buy real estate. At the time I was living in Peru and knew Ecuador was on it's 6th or 7th president in as many years. IL is about hawking real estate and nothing else.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Two days ago, on this thread, jedard made the following post:

hello friend,
just a short line to ask you to email me at cordoba1946@gmail.com
if you would like some very honest and update info on retiring to Argentina"
This afternoon, jedard stated a new thread in the "services offered" topic and wrote:"To really enjoy Argentina you should have all the proper documents.
This
includes ( but is not all inclusive ) a permanent or temporay visa.
Your DNI, a CUIL and some papers that can show you have been
paying water, heat or phone.
Mr. Gabriel Celano can obtain these for you without any hassels. If you already have a Visa he can get your DNI in 40 days.
He is an excellent lawyer and speaks english very well doing business here in in the USA.
I
am recommending him because I was sent to him after others took me for
a ride financially and mentally. He got mine in just 38 days.
Please call him at Cell 15 4400 9278 or Office 4342 9433 in BA
or visit his office at 634 Belgrano , 2nd flr A y B
joe dennie"

This post under the "services offered" may not be read by many, but I wanted those following this thread to see it, especially since jedard asked choklit to contact him privately for some "very honest" info. I think its important for those who want to get a DNI to know as much about the reality of process as possible.


Here is my reply to jedard's post:

If you already have your visa you are required by law to apply for
your DNI within 30 days, but you certainly don't need the services of a
lawyer. All you need to do is take "legalized" copies of your passport
and birth certificate (with the seal of the apostille, translated into
Spanish by an "official" translator, and notarized by an escribano).
You will need both of these to get the visa, so just make sure to have
two copies made at that time. For the DNI, you also need a cetificado
de domicilo which costs 10 pesos. To get the latter, simply take your
passport and ask for the certificado at the nearest comisaria (police
station). This is routine. Someone from the comisaria will come to your
residence the next day (in the order that the list was created the
previous day) and give you the paper. When you go to request the
certificate of residence, it helps if you have any piece of mail with
your name at that address, a copy of any of the immigration papers (if
it shows the address), a short term rental contract, or even a facutra
(receipt) from a store with your name and address (automatic if you buy
even the cheapest item at Garbarino or Fravega using a credit card). I
had an Omint Health insurance bill with my name and the address, but no
utility bills of any kind (phone, water, gas, etc).

Once you
have the certificado de domicilio, go to the regristro de las personas
on 25 de mayo with your passport, the original "visa" (with two
photocopies of it), and the "legalized/translated" copies of the birth
certicicate and passport and apply for your DNI. Go early. You will be
directed from one "sector" to the next and your documents will be
checked and rechecked. Then you will pay 15 pesos and then you will
wait to have your fingerprints taken. (If you don't already have the
two small color photos you can get them at this point. I advise you
wait and get the photos there as they like to have you pose at an
angle, looking upward to the left.)

Then they will give you a
receipt and tell you when to return to pick up the DNI. I was told to
return in 90 days (later in the day). I was able to travel abroad in
the interim with just the original "visa" paper from immigration. The
DNI was waiting for me when I returned 90 days later. There was no
reason to pay a lawyer and no reason to have the DNI any sooner than it
was ready. You don't need a CUIL if you have a visa rentista or
pensionista and are not working (temporary residents do not pay taxes on
foreign income and don't need to file with AFIP). I did get the CDI
from AFIP to buy an apartment. That took less than an hour (arriving
before they unlocked the doors) and I also did it alone, speaking a
minimum of Spanish. You need the certificado de residencia (hotel or temporary apartment OK) for this as well.
 

VMSmith

Registered
"choklit" said:
I am currently in the US military and will retire soon...After living in Naples, Italy for 7 years...
Presumably you are in the Navy, yes? Well, you get a couple of small bennies here as a retired military person. First, you get APO privileges at the U.S. Embassy. There are some constraints, but by and large it's a good deal.Second, you can use Tricare Overseas Program (TOP) for your health care issues. Got a problem? No hay problema. See a doctor, submit the bill, get a check in the mail.
Also, although I haven't confirmed it, I've been told that if you are a retired military officer (from any country) you can use the gym/health club at the Argentine Army Officer's club (located in a beautiful building in Retiro on Plaza San Martin).Good luck.
 

criswkh

Registered
I would check out other provinces of BA. Mendoza is a nice area. I sent you a private note with a Realtor. We basically live in BA (north zone). It is hard if you don't speak the language or have no patience to deal with massive bureaucratic paper work. If you are insistent of living here you will probably enjoy it. I agree with some of the post it isn't for everyone.
 

sergio

Registered
You will not find a stable expat community here as you will in places like Ajijic or San Miguel de Allende in Mexico. The expats you find will generally be young and transient. You will be far from the US with expensive air fares to get back. The economy will be unpredictable; you will need to learn Spanish.
 
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