Some cuevas have "gone legit" - will they go underground again as capital controls get worse?

Ries

Registered
more seriously, I have noticed, in the years since 2007 when I first bought an apartment here, that cuevas, in general, have been declining in both quantity and importance. Instead, anybody with any real money uses exchange agents whom you text, and they deliver your desired currency to you in private. The cuevas in my neighborhood are pretty nickel and dime, mostly. You need to call ahead if you want to do a transaction as "small" as $1000 USD. They serve mostly the lower middle class, often doing deals under $100USD. They certainly serve a purpose, and are essential to many many people, but in larger economic terms, they are more like Kioskos, not Hedge Funds.
 

ben

Active Member
"Nobody knows" is a fair answer - all other answers would be speculation, I understand that. But people were out in left field replying with answers to a question I didn't ask.

There will be robberies in any future.
People were answering the closest question that can have any other answer (except “Who the hell can know?”).
Once you reiterated that you were seeking to answer precisely that question to which no one can know the answer - well then, “Nobody knows”.
 

camel

Registered
People were answering the closest question that can have any other answer (except “Who the hell can know?”).
Once you reiterated that you were seeking to answer precisely that question to which no one can know the answer - well then, “Nobody knows”.
Ok but when someone informs me the peso is at 60, we're out in the weeds
 

MilHojas

Just Joined

The city’s informal money changers are preparing for a resurgence in their business after the Argentine government implemented currency controls last weekend in a bid to stifle demand for foreign currency
 
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