Standing in line.

Alby

Registered
Probably the thing that frustrates me the most is boarding a plane. As soon as boarding starts for special groups (e.g. handicapped, elderly etc) every Argentine rushes the gate even when it's not their boarding group for awhile. They're not exactly cutting because they don't try and board before their turn, but they make it impossible to get to the gate. When I'm in boarding group 1 it's a major effort to get to the gate. It's most noticeable when boarding a flight from the US to Argentina. The gate attendants will plead multiple times with people to step away from the boarding area until your group has been called. They say this in Spanish and English but Argentines just ignore it completely.
Jajaja. I'm not quite sure how to square this account away with my own observation: the phenomenon of arriving at the boarding gate, long before any official tries to create boarding groups, and seeing a queue already dozens of people long. I have never been able to understand why when, faced with a 12-hour flight, people want to stand for over an hour in a queue prior to that flight, simply to get to a seat that is already allocated and they are guaranteed to get.
 

jblaze5779

Registered
You ever been to China. Those folks don't know the meaning of the line. If you fight your way to the front forget about getting what you need.

My issue here is the existence of lines EVERYWHERE. Go to Coto on a workday at 12pm and there's nobody in the store except somehow the checkout line is still extended into the aisles.
 
Jajaja. I'm not quite sure how to square this account away with my own observation: the phenomenon of arriving at the boarding gate, long before any official tries to create boarding groups, and seeing a queue already dozens of people long. I have never been able to understand why when, faced with a 12-hour flight, people want to stand for over an hour in a queue prior to that flight, simply to get to a seat that is already allocated and they are guaranteed to get.
Human nature. Programmed for the win. (Which is usually a loss!)
 

Stantucker

Registered
My experience here with lines has been OK, not terrible not great. I've had a few people blatantly cut the line, an obvious street drunk almost attacked me when I told him to get to the back of the line. But in general people have been OK about lines. Certainly some oblivious people, but once you do a quick glare they realize their mistake and apologize and move to the back.

I do definitely notice the lack of respect for personal space, even in areas with plenty of space to make a line.

Probably the thing that frustrates me the most is boarding a plane. As soon as boarding starts for special groups (e.g. handicapped, elderly etc) every Argentine rushes the gate even when it's not their boarding group for awhile. They're not exactly cutting because they don't try and board before their turn, but they make it impossible to get to the gate. When I'm in boarding group 1 it's a major effort to get to the gate. It's most noticeable when boarding a flight from the US to Argentina. The gate attendants will plead multiple times with people to step away from the boarding area until your group has been called. They say this in Spanish and English but Argentines just ignore it completely.
My experience here in general is that Argentines wait there turn in line, but that does not happen in airports at boarding, as you point out, nor inside planes in the debording process. Some Argentines (I shouldn't say all but I will say too many) don't seem to understand that you have to wait until everybody in front of you has gotten his/her luggage and is moving down the aisle before you can start moving to get off.

I am going to get some negative feedback about this but I will say it anyway: Latinos in general just don't understand the idea of waiting in line or just don't give a damn. I can share stories about Venezuelans in Disney World or Spanish housewives in supermarkets, etc. if you need my unscientific proof.
 

Iznogud

Registered
I am going to get some negative feedback about this but I will say it anyway: Latinos in general just don't understand the idea of waiting in line or just don't give a damn. I can share stories about Venezuelans in Disney World or Spanish housewives in supermarkets, etc. if you need my unscientific proof.
Try learning to ski on the Italian Alps.

Romanes eunt domus! :)

Iz
 

dsp27

Registered
The issue here is not people not respecting the line, the problem is the inefficient check out process. Cashiers are slow and sloppy, and most importantly paying takes forever, it’s like signing a lease on a Prius and not paying for 20 bucks worth of goods.
 

Redpossum

Registered
In some places there seems to be a rule that the elderly and handicapped and pregnant women can cut to the front of the line. I've seen that happen in the WU office. I'm 60-something myself, old enough to get the senior discount at the Carrefour, but people always tell me I seem younger, so I've never tried to exercise this privilege.

Most of the non-legit line-cutting I have seen in my 7-years-plus here has been during the last year, when there are/were limits on the number of people in a small store. I'm waiting my turn just outside and some schmuck waltzes up and starts to go inside. I tell him/her, "Disculpe señor(a), hay cola", and then they give me that, "Oh, really? Gee, I'm sorry, I didn't know...". Like they think the three of us are standing there one behind the other birdwatching or something. Yeah, it annoys the puppy poop out of me.
 

Greg S

Registered
My experience here in general is that Argentines wait there turn in line, but that does not happen in airports at boarding, as you point out, nor inside planes in the debording process. Some Argentines (I shouldn't say all but I will say too many) don't seem to understand that you have to wait until everybody in front of you has gotten his/her luggage and is moving down the aisle before you can start moving to get off.

I am going to get some negative feedback about this but I will say it anyway: Latinos in general just don't understand the idea of waiting in line or just don't give a damn. I can share stories about Venezuelans in Disney World or Spanish housewives in supermarkets, etc. if you need my unscientific proof.
Here. Airplane etiquette in the USA a couple days ago. Flight from Miami to Chicago. I'll take caba any day.

 

wineguy999

Registered
Jajaja. I'm not quite sure how to square this account away with my own observation: the phenomenon of arriving at the boarding gate, long before any official tries to create boarding groups, and seeing a queue already dozens of people long. I have never been able to understand why when, faced with a 12-hour flight, people want to stand for over an hour in a queue prior to that flight, simply to get to a seat that is already allocated and they are guaranteed to get.
Nothing to do with a seat, of course! It's about insufficient overhead bin space.
 

Silvie

Registered
They try to do it to me very often and I am a local. Even one guy who had 2 bottles of whisky went ahead everybody on the supermarket line trying to leave first.
Many times I just look the other way just to avoid having a fight; other times, I engage on a fight.
 
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