Sushi Inflation in Buenos Aires

Fiscal

Registered
Just went to Irifune last week. $60 for three plates of sushi, one of which was just raw tuna., pretty average.
 

pmacay

Newcomer
Yes, they WAY over due it on the cream cheese, and the fish is primarily salmon, I love salmon but you don't want a whole plate of just salmon, it's hard to find a nice variety of other fish. I ordered from Furusato for over 15 years but they appear to be out of business now. Now I order delivery from http://www.maki-sushi.com.ar/ Very good quality and an ok variety of fish other then salmon and it arrives very fast and super fresh. I saw an ad for http://www.futusushi.com.ar which seems to have a great selection but I have not tried them yet. There's another place I haven't tried http://www.gakosushi.com.ar/ but it looks like 90% of the rolls have cream cheese in them, sigh.... If anyone can suggest a good delivery place I'd appreciate it.
 

Aztangogirl

Registered
To say "mexican food is disgusting" is just ignorant.
There are a couple of dozen different mexican cuisines, which vary widely.
There is Zero authentic mexican food in Buenos Aires.
So, unless you have lived in Mexico, travelled there, or learned to cook mexican dishes (I have, all three) you are completely unconvincing.

Everyone is allowed their personal taste-
which means, saying "I dont like Mexican food" is completely Ok, and, no doubt, true.
But its meaningless when discussing the bigger issue of the authenticity and quality of "foreign" food in Argentina.

I enjoy Argentine food. I wouldnt own a home here, and have spent portions of the last 12 years here, if I did not.
I have also travelled pretty extensively in Europe since 1968.
And Argentine food has a pretty loose connection to real Italian or Spanish food.

Its like the old joke of the Argentine, visiting Italy for the first time, opening the phone book, and exclaiming- "Hey- all of the people here have Argentine Names!".

Italians, for one, are pretty amused at what is called "Italian Food" here.
And the Spanish feel similarly.
After all, the Spanish basically invented molecular cooking, with ElBulli.
A couple of his chefs, one of them Argentine, opened an excellent restaurant in Montserrat years ago- I went a few times, it was incredible. And Argentines, predictably, were befuddled and confused by it, and it went out of business within a year or two.
So much for honoring heritage.

There are a bunch of restaurants in Buenos Aires, run by rising Argentine chefs, that I think are excellent. The times they are a changing, and the food here is consistently getting better, fresher, and more sophisticated.
And I will still visit PinPun at 2am for a porcion.
I totally agree. The food has improved here so much. I had the most amazing meal at Cafe San Juan on Calle Chile. The pho at Saigon is great. The food at Tanta downtown is wonderful. If you take the time to look and try, you will find great food here.
 

Ries

Registered
I totally agree. The food has improved here so much. I had the most amazing meal at Cafe San Juan on Calle Chile. The pho at Saigon is great. The food at Tanta downtown is wonderful. If you take the time to look and try, you will find great food here.
The original Cafe San Juan is really good, too. (More expensive, though) Lately, I have been eating at the tapas/vermouth bar in the front of the one you went to, on Chile- sit at the bar, they cook little tapas plates to order for you, we usually split 3 of em and are very satisfied.
 

sts7049

Registered
cafe san juan and san juan cantina are both fantastic. one of the better restaurants i've eaten at anywhere, honestly.
 

garryl

Registered
Sushi in Buenos Aires = salmon, comida de china = fried rice with bean sprouts and carrots. I know someone who is in the fishing business in Argentina coast. They mainly fish shrimp, squid and certain fish, but there are so many things in the ocean that Argentines are not interested. I rarely see shellfish in Argentina, it's not common for sure. Most people only know limited way to cook fish, bread the fish fillet and fry/bake it. I guess there is abundant of beef on land, they lost the interest to look for food in the ocean.
And they do not know how to keep their sea food fresh, shrimp is never fresh, fish is OK. If you are lucky to run into mussels, scallop, usually it's not good. Pajella with chicken skin is a turn off. I do nor like the Pajella in Spain either. The best one is ones in Mission district of San Francisco.

When it comes to beef, Argentines have names for the meat from every part. In other culture, it will be just called beef (stew) or steak.
Americans always ask Manu Ginobili why Argentina beef is so good, his answer is : the cut is different. Most Americans still do not understand what he is talking about. He was really saying that Argentines eat every part of the cow, that makes it tasty. Plus the well grilled meat has a special flavor that many Americans do not know because they like it rare.
 
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